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Thread: Trigger job vs dry firing

  1. #1
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    gorenut's Avatar
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    Default Trigger job vs dry firing

    Just curious how your average, run-of-the-mill trigger job compares to dry-firing the gun until the cows come home. Not talking about match triggers here, just standard.

  2. #2
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    Dry firing and just shooting the pistol will absolutely smooth out the trigger. If you have a DA/SA trigger and you are trying to smooth up the SA, make sure you cock the hammer every time before dry firing that way you will be smoothing up the SA. It will take time to smooth up but it will. It won't however compare to an action job by Bruce Gray.
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  3. #3
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    Of course not. Thats a whole different level. I'm talking about just a standard one that a smith might do for under $100. I asked this because I know with my old P226s, the trigger got really smooth and I never noticed how smooth it got until i got another P226. Even though the second one I got was used, the trigger was stiff and garbage like. When I got my USP, I admit.. it was closer to the scale of garbage as my second P226. Now that I've taken it down the range as well as dry-firing it like crazy... I'm second guessing if I should even have a smoothing job for the trigger. About the only thing I might want at this point is less creep on it.. which I know no amounts of dry-firing/usage will fix.

  4. #4
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    The main advantage of a true trigger job over simply breaking it in the old fashioned way, is limiting over-travel and take-up length, and adjusting spring tensions. Other than that, the polishing part is more or less and accelerated "break-in" of the parts, getting them to match up with each other.

    The first competition shooter I ever really got to know used to just pack polishing compound into the trigger components and go shoot for a day.
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    I prefer the "do it yourself via break-in" trigger job. IMO, it's the only trigger work to be done on a firearm meant for social encounters. All too often, I find that many shooters opt to get a trigger job in an effort to overcome training deficiencies. Just my .02.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gtmtnbiker98 View Post
    I prefer the "do it yourself via break-in" trigger job. IMO, it's the only trigger work to be done on a firearm meant for social encounters. All too often, I find that many shooters opt to get a trigger job in an effort to overcome training deficiencies. Just my .02.
    Thats my general take as well. As mentioned, my USPs trigger is now really smooth from dry-firing practice and taking it to the range. I still want to reduce some of the creep though.

  7. #7
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    What are the parts that need polishing on the trigger to make it smoother in both modes? I can smooth with a light abrasive if I know what and where to polish. Thanks.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 64tinc View Post
    What are the parts that need polishing on the trigger to make it smoother in both modes? I can smooth with a light abrasive if I know what and where to polish. Thanks.
    If you don't already know or are able to figure out which parts need polishing, I highly recommend not touching your trigger assembly yourself. If you are looking for an affordable job contact Bill Springfield. If you take too much material off or change the wrong contact angle of the trigger components you might end up with an unsafe pistol on your hands.

  9. #9
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    Dry firing will smooth it up somewhat eventually. HK uses high grade steel in their pistols, a lot a dry firing or firing will need to be done. DF will not lighten the pull or reduce creep.

    Bill
    www.triggerwork.net
    Trigger services provided for most military semi rifles, HK USP's, P30's, and P2000's.

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    Since I own a USP .45 Tactical I learned to really like the match trigger. Consequently I have had a match trigger installed in both my USP 9mm and USP 40. Now all my full size USPs have the same trigger groups and characteristics. I prefer to leave trigger work to the folks that make a living working on the guns. A local shop has an HK armorer so that's where my pistols go for work on the internals. Otherwise it's off to HK, Bill, or Bruce. JMHO
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