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Thread: P30 vs P30L Recoil Spring

  1. #1
    HKPRO PREMIUM PARTNER

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    Default P30 vs P30L Recoil Spring

    Anyone have an info as to whether or not the 9mm p30 and 9mm p30L have recoil springs with the same spring constant?

    Thanks,
    Harvey

  2. #2
    PROFESSIONAL WEB SURFER
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    Yes, recoil springs are the same for both P30 and P30L.
    HK: Yeah, I've got that!

  3. #3
    HKPRO PREMIUM PARTNER

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    Quote Originally Posted by TooSixy View Post
    Yes, recoil springs are the same for both P30 and P30L.
    Thanks. The reason I'm asking is that I've been curious as to why several members have indicated that the P30's are less prone to break-in issues than the P30L's. I'm thinking that the same spring cut to fit the P30 would exert less force on the slide. Additionally, the shorter barrel implies less bullet velocity implies less recoil momentum, and the slide is also less massive. This should result in faster rearward slide velocity and hence better extraction/ejection performance.

    As you can see, this has been a boring day for me at work and my mind has wandered on to "more important" things.

  4. #4
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    Actually, I've seen just the opposite: more P30L's are prone to break-in issues. The recoil springs for both guns are the exact same part, down to the part #.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooSixy View Post
    Actually, I've seen just the opposite: more P30L's are prone to break-in issues. The recoil springs for both guns are the exact same part, down to the part #.
    I re-read my post, I guess it was somewhat ambiguous. I was trying to state the reasons why the P30's are less prone to break-in issues than the P30L's. Let me try again because I did make a mistake.

    For the P30:
    1. Same spring constant with shorter length implies less restoring force on the slide implies faster rearward slide velocity.
    2. Shorter barrel length, etc. implies less recoil momentum implies slower rearward slide velocity. This is not good (here's where I screwed up)
    3. Less massive slide implies faster rearward slide velocities.

    My guess is 1 and 3 dominate and results in faster rearward slide speed and hence better extraction/ejection performance for the P30.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by hgratt View Post
    I re-read my post, I guess it was somewhat ambiguous. I was trying to state the reasons why the P30's are less prone to break-in issues than the P30L's. Let me try again because I did make a mistake.

    For the P30:
    1. Same spring constant with shorter length implies less restoring force on the slide implies faster rearward slide velocity.
    2. Shorter barrel length, etc. implies less recoil momentum implies slower rearward slide velocity. This is not good (here's where I screwed up)
    3. Less massive slide implies faster rearward slide velocities.

    My guess is 1 and 3 dominate and results in faster rearward slide speed and hence better extraction/ejection performance for the P30.
    In P30L spring is same, difference in muzzle velocity is negligible, slide is heavier. Lower inertia of P30 slide allows better function with weaker ammo. This lower inertia also increases slide speed, but not to levels that would make feeding problems. break-in issues are always on extraction and they happen when there is to low recoil impulse to overcame combined spring tension and slide inertia (weak ammo and/or light bullet) or too much drag on extraction (steel or alu cases). Once recoil spring sets to final tension problems go away, but still weak/light ammo combined with high extraction drag may still be a problem. HK pistols are tuned to work with full power, defensive or military ammo. Recoil system and slide masses are optimized to handle increased slide momentum generated by this loads. When you tune pistol to low powered ammo, then you go into serious problems with pistol durability and reliability with hotter loads. Of course use of recoil buffers of different styles help to make pistols that work well with wide choice of ammo and HK P series is good at this, but still there are limits. Also recoil spring must have enough tension and slide enough mass to have enough momentum to feed ammo even in very dirty or dry pistol. No free lunches.
    Montrala

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    Current: HK45C, P30L, P2000SK, MR223
    Past: P2000, P30, P7M13, Expert, G3 (MKE T41)
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