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    Default Century Cetme older

    Hi,

    Looking at picking up a nice looking serial #C016xx. How does one tell exactly if the receiver is cast? The bolt carrier has absolutely no markings on it. Wood looks brand new.

    I’m assuming this is one of the very first Century builds. Says made St Albans VT.

    Thanks,
    Marc


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    Mark, hard to describe to you in words. If you hold one next to a stamped receiver, it is very easy to tell. One somewhat easier method, but not saying it is 100%; look at the back sight tower. If it appears to blend with the receiver, then it is more than likely a cast stainless receiver. If the sight appears to be a bent piece of metal, with several tack welds to keep it in place, that is a bent steel receiver.

    Also, the cast receivers have a very clear and clean impression for all the identifying text. The stamped ones do to, but there is a difference. Wish I had some pictures to share.
    Last edited by Crackerjack; 04-01-2018 at 03:05 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hopdevil View Post
    Hi,

    Looking at picking up a nice looking serial #C016xx. How does one tell exactly if the receiver is cast? The bolt carrier has absolutely no markings on it. Wood looks brand new.

    I’m assuming this is one of the very first Century builds. Says made St Albans VT.

    Thanks,
    Marc
    Marc,

    That is an early one (before the move to Georgia, Vermont)--- not a CAI aficionado, but I am not aware of CAI producing a cast receiver--- it should be a stamped receiver!!!

    Tony

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    OK, stole these images from the internet. If they post, you can see that the cast receiver has a very square front portion to the mag well, unlike stamped steel that is rolled and welded. The rear sight can be seen blended into the receiver and the scope mount points are very prominent, sharp and clean. Hope these pictures help. PLEASE NOTE picture #2 is the ole Frankenstein cast receivers from Fed Arms and later DC. They are JUNK. Avoid them. They loose head space because the casting is aluminum. It is soft. The early CAI cast are based on a Special Weapons mold and took sintered Stainless Steel. Picture #1 and #3 are the SS cast receivers. You can see that the structural rib around the mag well is very prominent. Also, the corners to the mag well are pretty sharp as well, not rounded.

    The stainless steel cast receivers are very nice. They can be a problem for mounting a G3 collapsing stock, as the rail channels are narrower than stamped steel. I never tried, but you may be able to overcome this with some grinding down of the stock legs on the collapsing stock. I believe a Choate side folder will work without too much trouble. I had one years ago and the early guns were put together with excellent parts kits. Mine was super accurate with my own hand load. I did a write up on Cruffler. I think it is still archived. Not the best written or edited, but has some interesting details.

    Good luck with the purchase. The good thing is that so many have heard terrible things about the later model Cetmes by CAI that they tend to lump them all together and you may get a very nice price. I would say anything under $700 for the earlier cast stainless steel receivers is a good price. I would pay upwards of $800 for one again now if I found one with the good parts kits, clean wood and clean bore.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Century Cetme older-download-1.jpg   Century Cetme older-download-2.jpg   Century Cetme older-436811_03_cetme_308_battle_rifle_cast_st_640.jpg  
    Last edited by Crackerjack; 04-01-2018 at 04:18 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hopdevil View Post
    Hi,

    Looking at picking up a nice looking serial #C016xx. How does one tell exactly if the receiver is cast? The bolt carrier has absolutely no markings on it. Wood looks brand new.

    I’m assuming this is one of the very first Century builds. Says made St Albans VT.

    Thanks,
    Marc


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    If it says St Albans you are in like Flint.



    Last edited by hansellhd2; 04-01-2018 at 08:18 PM.
    HDH.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crackerjack View Post
    OK, stole these images from the internet. If they post, you can see that the cast receiver has a very square front portion to the mag well, unlike stamped steel that is rolled and welded. The rear sight can be seen blended into the receiver and the scope mount points are very prominent, sharp and clean. Hope these pictures help. PLEASE NOTE picture #2 is the ole Frankenstein cast receivers from Fed Arms and later DC. They are JUNK. Avoid them. They loose head space because the casting is aluminum. It is soft. The early CAI cast are based on a Special Weapons mold and took sintered Stainless Steel. Picture #1 and #3 are the SS cast receivers. You can see that the structural rib around the mag well is very prominent. Also, the corners to the mag well are pretty sharp as well, not rounded.

    The stainless steel cast receivers are very nice. They can be a problem for mounting a G3 collapsing stock, as the rail channels are narrower than stamped steel. I never tried, but you may be able to overcome this with some grinding down of the stock legs on the collapsing stock. I believe a Choate side folder will work without too much trouble. I had one years ago and the early guns were put together with excellent parts kits. Mine was super accurate with my own hand load. I did a write up on Cruffler. I think it is still archived. Not the best written or edited, but has some interesting details.

    Good luck with the purchase. The good thing is that so many have heard terrible things about the later model Cetmes by CAI that they tend to lump them all together and you may get a very nice price. I would say anything under $700 for the earlier cast stainless steel receivers is a good price. I would pay upwards of $800 for one again now if I found one with the good parts kits, clean wood and clean bore.
    Thanks,

    Picture #2 made me laugh really hard. What a piece of dog turd looking rifle.

    The rifle I purchased is a stamped receiver. Pictures cleared it up.




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    Just to clarify--- St. Albans, VT. = stamped receivers, and Georgia, VT. = stainless steel cast receivers--- can anyone else confirm this???

    Tony

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGG View Post
    Just to clarify--- St. Albans, VT. = stamped receivers, and Georgia, VT. = stainless steel cast receivers--- can anyone else confirm this???

    Tony
    Yes that is correct Tony and the cast stainless steel receivers are built like tanks. The only real down side to them is that the outside dimensions are slightly larger which means you can not use a collapsible stock and fitting a scope mount can be difficult.

    EDIT: I think the cast receivers were made at both factories but the cast ones from St. Albans, VT were made with NOS parts.
    Last edited by The_Great_308; 04-03-2018 at 01:56 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hopdevil View Post
    Thanks,

    Picture #2 made me laugh really hard. What a piece of dog turd looking rifle.

    The rifle I purchased is a stamped receiver. Pictures cleared it up.




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    If the photos you posted are of your rifle that appears to be a cast receiver to me. The rear sight appears to be part of the casting not welded on and the rear of the receiver is slightly stepped down so the stock will slide on. If you post a few photos of the mag well it might help.
    Last edited by The_Great_308; 04-04-2018 at 03:54 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Great_308 View Post
    Yes that is correct Tony and the cast stainless steel receivers are built like tanks. The only real down side to them is that the outside dimensions are slightly larger which means you can not use a collapsible stock and fitting a scope mount can be difficult.

    EDIT: I think the cast receivers were made at both factories but the cast ones from St. Albans, VT were made with NOS parts.
    Thanks--- wait--- so all are cast receivers--- ST ALB and GA???

    Tony

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