Separate 40 and 9mm or two 40's with conversion barrels?
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Thread: Separate 40 and 9mm or two 40's with conversion barrels?

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    Which is the better way to go: separate caliber guns, one in 9 and one 40, or two in 40 with 9mm conversion barrels? Uspc and p2000sk.
    Reason for both calibers is for less expensive range time using 9mm, then converting back to 40. ...
    Last edited by icenoir; 12-28-2018 at 03:58 PM.

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    Two guns.
    When you buy a 'gun, you're buying a barrel.

    Would you rather have two BMW M5s with factory motors? Or do you want to take a factory fresh German car, rip out the motor and replace it with an American origin Kia motor?
    Except in this example, Kia is a small privately held company that hasn't tested their motors, makes zero representations, offers no warranties and despite being asked over and over and over and over, cannot provide a modicum of performance data for their engine.
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    Two guns. You can sell them down the road separately and perhaps recoup what you paid for them, or take a big loss on a used barrel lol

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    I agree with the above posters suggesting two guns.

    I’ve converted .40 cal Glocks to 9mm but that was just for range use and the conversion kits for those aren’t as expensive. I could also see a conversion being desireable if space is limited and you cannot fit more guns, but I definitely agree with the “just get one of each” mindset, but sounds like your buying two anyway so why not get a 9mm and a 40!

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    Either way I am suggesting two guns either one in each caliber or two 40s with 9mm barrels...

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    Willful Omission: Manufacturer will not tell us what the velocity is because they know that it's "not good", and anyone who would ask that question wouldn't want to buy it if they had the answer because they care.

    Negligent Omission: Manufacturer is not competent enough to have A) heard of a chronograph, B) felt the chronograph numbers are important when manufacturing a device whose sole purpose is making metal move fast, or C) do not think their clients intelligent enough to either know or care about velocity.

    Pick whichever one makes you feel better, I guess. In my job, either one will land you in the clink.
    Last edited by Disregarded9-side; 12-28-2018 at 07:53 PM.

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    Heyas Ice- my answer is...budget. If I could afford both pistols, each in different caliber, that's the route I'd go. If (well hell, WHAT "if"??) my budget wouldn't allow for both (which mine won't) I'd go with the conversion.
    However. Here's My 2 cents on why have both. Backup. What if one of them goes down, and needs repair? OR what if you actually do have to USE it in defense, and the police confiscate the weapon? Or you have one for carry, and one for nightstand, and you have rotation capability.
    It basically comes down to what you can afford, and what you can afford best.

    That said.... IF you do get it with the conversion, and you end up selling the weapon.... You're Not gonna get what you put into it. Buyers don't care how much the extra barrel costed you. They only care about how much is coming outta Their pocket.
    Slight exception with a 40 to 357 conversion, but still not as desireable when it's 9mm/40.

    THAT said.... 40 is going outta "style". I'm not saying that the round will go extinct, but it's possible that some places may start carrying less of it, in about 5 to ten years. Having an alternative barrel might be real handy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by icenoir View Post
    Which is the better way to go: separate caliber guns, one in 9 and one 40, or two in 40 with 9mm conversion barrels? Uspc and p2000sk.
    Reason for both calibers is for less expensive range time using 9mm, then converting back to 40. ...
    In this case, I would say buy 2 9mm's. I'm not going to enter a caliber debate, but you should practice with what you intend to use. If you can't afford to practice with .40S&W, it's better to just go with a 9mm that you can afford to practice with. The recoil will be different for each caliber, so practicing with 9mm is not necessarily going to prepare you for what it's like shooting a .40 if you're recoil sensitive. Also, conversion barrels may or may not be as accurate or reliable as the original barrels, so that introduces another issue.

    The same is true for buying one of the two guns in 9mm and the other in .40 S&W (let's say USPc in 9mm, P2000sk in .40S&W), however instead of just changing calibers, you're also changing the size of the gun that you practice with and carry (I'm assuming these will be carried, because they are compact/subcompact models). Practicing with a 9mm in a compact gun is not the same as practicing with a subcompact in .40 S&W. Practice with what you'll carry.

    If you can afford to practice with .40S&W, and you're only going to be happy with that round, then buy both guns in .40S&W and practice with them like that, too. Don't bother with 9mm barrels.
    Last edited by Kenakth; 12-28-2018 at 09:13 PM.

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    Ok, thanks all. Good points.

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    My 2 cents, I had a Sig P229 that shot .22, 9mm and .40. It's nice to have options but train with what you are going to carry. I did not change that one up very often. But... I like the idea for something you just want to try. Example is trying .357 sig with a barrel swap with a .40 S&W pistol.

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