Technically speaking, how does the VP9 operate differently than a Glock?
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Thread: Technically speaking, how does the VP9 operate differently than a Glock?

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    Default Technically speaking, how does the VP9 operate differently than a Glock?

    I've been watching a video on the Glock 43 and how it works. It's one of those animation videos showing you how everything works. It's literally called "How A Glock 43 Works - 3D Animation"

    However the trigger bar and the connector seem different in the VP9. To me it seems like it's mostly the same but a few differences, and I'm trying to understand the little details of my firearms more lately.

    Can anyone explain exactly how the VP9 works and compare and contrast it to this video? I love these animations because I learn so much, but they don't have too many with HK stuff.

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    Pay special attention to the striker, specifically when/how the striker is tensioned.


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    Glock uses a progressive striker design, charging the unit compresses the striker spring around 60-70%. Pulling the trigger moves the striker back the remaining amount to compress the spring and releases the striker; therefore lots of creep. Charging the VP0/40 the striker is compressed all the way, after the slack take up pulling the trigger drops the sear right away; therefore a crisper pull.
    Bill
    triggerwork.net

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    Quote Originally Posted by bspring1 View Post
    Glock uses a progressive striker design, charging the unit compresses the striker spring around 60-70%. Pulling the trigger moves the striker back the remaining amount to compress the spring and releases the striker; therefore lots of creep. Charging the VP0/40 the striker is compressed all the way, after the slack take up pulling the trigger drops the sear right away; therefore a crisper pull.
    Bill
    triggerwork.net
    You’re making it too easy for him . Good explanation.


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    First starters, its not a cheap piece of crap.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sniperhunter View Post
    First starters, its not a cheap piece of crap.
    LOL! Oh my God. Not saying I agree or disagree, but please emphasize more on this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Constantine View Post
    LOL! Oh my God. Not saying I agree or disagree, but please emphasize more on this.
    1) This is HKPro...HK > anything else...always...no matter what (truth be damned)
    2) There's 4x VP's....3 sizes of 9mm and a 40 cal. There are 6? different "sizes" of Glock, 5 generations, and 9? different caliber chamberings that vary GREATLY in reliability and get lumped in together and an apples to apples comparison is seldom made fairly.
    3) The truth is neither is perfect and both are exemplary for $500 9mm duty pistols.


    The condition of the striker is noted.

    Safety controls differ. Glock uses a plunger style striker block while HK uses a cam.

    Trigger mechanism vary greatly. Glock uses the striker spring and a dedicated trigger spring (the NY style, "S" coil spring, or the Gen 5 flat spring). HK uses their traditional (and what many would argue is the weakest point of the HK pistol design) of the coiled trigger return spring or TRS with the tension on the spring legs and the braided trigger bar spring (that was the cause of concern early on).

    Glocks use pins which stay in place (ideally) by their interface with other parts...much like an AR15's fcg...very few roll pins and the few that exist are not required for full tear down. The VP has several roll pins and the full disassembly is a bit more complex than the Glock.
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    All I know is most of my gun enthusiast friends who have Glocks have done a lot of mods to them. The factory Glocks I've shot, are something I could get used to but the grip angle and factory trigger make my HKs (or even my PPQ) my choice.
    VP9 - times 4
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    Quote Originally Posted by WolfieRules View Post
    All I know is most of my gun enthusiast friends who have Glocks have done a lot of mods to them. The factory Glocks I've shot, are something I could get used to but the grip angle and factory trigger make my HKs (or even my PPQ) my choice.
    That's for that partner, well said.

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    As others have noted in an HK forum, HK > all others. Pull the trigger on both and see which one you hit the target the most and what feels better in your hand then buy it and eventually buy all the other HKs, it's a fine line between having one and starting a collection.

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