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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeyWhisper View Post
    I think you are either way over qualified to be here or you are some sort of Demi-god. The MP5SD was on my top list of “OMG I want one of those!” growing up and is the main reason I joined HKPro. There is a TON of info and great insights from the members here. Welcome to the club. Good luck with your MP5K build and definitely document your progress with it. Lots of pictures and tips as you find them!

    (“...considerable time behind a PSG1.” I’m stealing this quote.)
    Was commenting on the actual thread and saw the standard quote at the bottom of all your posts. George Carlin would be proud......

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by THRLSEKR View Post
    Saw this post and it reminded me of a guy I used to train with up in Massachusetts at a big-name company. If your last name has a III (3rd)on it, P.M. me.

    Mike
    Sorry, I do not have a "III" in my name, however if whoever you trained with in Mass had a similar background I may know him.

  3. #13
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    Thank you. I have been looking around the forum and am looking for an appropriate place to document the build. I just got the barrel done yesterday.

    The MP5SD was a fun gun, not one I would take into a real gun fight but it had its place. We had and used some MP5Ks as well once in a while, we even had the 70's briefcases for them which was a lot of fun to play with, pain to reload though. I liked the PSG1's for the most part but they are heavy and a bit limited in what they can be used for. Many of the people I worked with from foreign countries had them, so we had to be familiar with them. They were accurate enough but the optic was lacking in that it was a plain wire reticle and did not facilitate leads for movers or holds for winds. Also, those things throw brass quite aways which sucked. They were/are definitely well built and robust but not overly useful by today's standards. I modified my PTR91 to be something similar to a MSG90 or SR9T due to my experiences with the PSG1. I cannot say that it is my "favorite" rifle but I do like it.

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  5. #14
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    Welcome to the forum. From your experiences, what part/s tend to fail in the mp5 platform? what do you do to prevent it from failing? TIA.

  6. #15
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    From memory, the one thing I remember is that the extractors would fail from time to time, however we had a pretty intensive maintenance program for all of our weapons so it was rare that a shooter experienced a problem. I cannot say I every remember a MP5 going down, not saying it never happened but I don't remember it. As I am sure everyone here knows, they (like most German weapons) are very robust and take a lot of punishment. I shot many thousands of rounds out of MP5s (A3s and SDs) in addition to be around and working with many others shooting them and do not ever remember any catastrophic failures outside of the occasional failure to eject. The main reason for the failure was a lack of cleaning by the user along with just general fatigue. Note that I said we had an intensive maintenance program, this is not the same as operator cleaning. Our maintenance program had the weapons inspected by armorers frequently and once a year all of them were torn apart and gone through.

  7. #16
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    Welcome to the site and thanks for all you've done! I hope to work with SF some day.

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drewer View Post
    Welcome to the site and thanks for all you've done! I hope to work with SF some day.
    Well I do not know anything about you Drewer, but I will offer this; it is a long road to get into but worth every second. That said, there are many facets of both Special Forces and Special Operations (not the same thing, Special Forces = Green Beret, Special Operations covers all entities, Green Berets, SEALs, MARSOC, Ranger Regiment, Task Force 160th, USAF CCT and PJ, etc.). There are many jobs within Special Operations, most of which movies are not made about but are equally important and directly contributes to the effectiveness of the overall effort. I used to tell our support troops that while being a Green Beret obviously has its appeal, it is not for everyone and we as an organization needed the best support people possible in order to do what we had to do. Being a SOF operator seems all sexy and cool but what the commercials, TV shows and movies do not adequately depict is the pain and commitment required. It is not a job, it is a lifestyle and while it has its rewards, it has its cost as well. On my first team, everyone who had ever been married had been divorced at least once (most more than once). When you retire you are physically busted up which makes getting older 1000 times more difficult. The same thing can be said of any of the combat arms, you pay your entrance fee in pain and then it just gets worse from there. Again, I have zero regrets and am very happy I was able to accomplish what I did, but everyone should feel the same about doing whatever they do in the military and be as good as they are humanly capable of.

    Sorry for the tirade....

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by tactinstr View Post
    Sorry for the tirade....
    No apologies needed Sir, I appreciate the info. I'm 28 and leaving in a month with a CCT contract. Long journey ahead but I am looking forward to the ride.

    Regarding my comment with working with SF, it comes from reading about some of the CCTs that attached to different ODAs in Iraq/Afghanistan. I have a good buddy who's an Echo with 5th group who's also added some fuel to the fire after hearing about some of the CCTs he's had a chance to work with.

  10. #19
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    Oh yeah you have a long road ahead for sure. I worked with many CCT guys, went to a few schools with some and deployed with yet some more. I always marveled at the dynamic between them and the PJs, in general some CCT guys were guys who could not make it through the medical part of the the PJ program. the son of a very good friend of mine won the silver star as a CCT guy while he was attached to 5th or 3rd Group.

    If I can offer one piece of advice, never take yourself too seriously and always remember that many guys went before you and many will come after you, so there is not reason you cannot make it. What gets most guys going through this level of training is themselves, they talk themselves out of it and convince themselves of some reason to quit. I know what you are thinking "that won't be me", but everyone who has ever gone through training like this has had their moment of doubt, me included. What got me through it was what I just told you, many had made it before me and many will make it after me, I know that I am at least as good as some of them. As my son used to say "you cannot have no in your heart"... lol. Good luck and if I can provide any advice, just let me know.

  11. #20
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    Thanks for taking the time to write that up, I appreciate the insight and will take it to heart.
    As I sit here warm and comfortable....I can say I'm looking forward to facing those moments you describe to see what it's all about!

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