After Action Report: Nov 2019 Teufelshund Tactical HK Advanced Concealed Carry Course
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Thread: After Action Report: Nov 2019 Teufelshund Tactical HK Advanced Concealed Carry Course

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    Default After Action Report: Nov 2019 Teufelshund Tactical HK Advanced Concealed Carry Course

    Well, it had been a while since Ben and I had offered an "Operator" style course. Funny how life gets I the way. So we were glad to be able to fit this one in at the end of the year. Of course we were excited to be able to be back at Frontline Defense in Warrenton, NC for this training. Not only is it an amazing training complex with multiple long range and close range areas including loads of steel and vehicles, but it also has a new classroom and Paul, the owner and his staff, are welcoming and incredibly supportive to allowing us to do what other ranges most often do not.



    And absolutely, one of the best things about training here is the ability to hit up our favorites, Bojangles and Sheetz, at the same intersection!



    This course was specifically designed as an Advanced Concealed Carry Course, with deliberate, stacked/progressive skill drills intended to quickly establish a solid base of fundamentals and then rapidly progress those skills to more and more complex capabilities that are necessary in a "real life" shooting situation. Though we started in the classroom, in order maximize training, almost all of the instruction was conducted on the range.





    I have to say that without a doubt, for me and Ben, this was an incredibly humbling course. Not only did we fill up the class, but over half of the students returning for their 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and even 6th course with us. That level of dedication is not often seen within the firearms training community and reminds us that both we are providing quality instruction and also that our goal of continuous process improvement is paying off. And having a class full of solid shooters, receptive, ready and willing to soak up the knowledge, who are also great friends meant we spent the entire weekend smiling, laughing and joking throughout, even despite some less than ideal weather on the first day and night.









    A period of heavy rain forced us to adjust slightly, in how we presented some of the training, but it also allowed us to recognize failure points in clothing and gear that we otherwise would not have tested. Throughout the entire weekend, which included two 12-hour/days nights of training, I was impressed to see that we had no weapon failures; a testament to the quality of the selected firearms (those who came to training with the Austrian persuasions were not allowed to participate in this photo).



    As mentioned before, Frontline Defense offers us the ability to run specific drills that most other ranges prevent. Always a crowd favorite is the chance to take our pistols and abilities and test them back much further that we initially think capable. During the "walk back drill", we start at 25 yards and then walk back to the 150 yard line, shooting at distances along the way. It is an eye opening experience for the students to realize that the fundamentals of stance, grips, eyes and trigger control practiced so thoroughly at 3-7 yards allows you to make first round hits on steel with iron sights on your handguns.











    With fundamentals covered, we moved on to a series of drills that incorporated movement and spatial awareness while stressing speed and accuracy and firing from less than ideal positions. Being able to cover drills during the day and then again at night drives home the realization of just how much more challenging it is to be fast and accurate at night, and just how important having the opportunity to train at night is; an opportunity most training courses/locations do not offer.

    Another thing that sets our training apart from others, besides the design of the drills, is simply the amount of reps. I've participated in countless training evolutions where you might have the opportunity to run each drill once or twice, or might not even draw from the holster until the end of a 5-hour training day where you only got to shoot 150 rounds. Each student shot well over 1000 rounds, must have drawn and reholstered a couple of hundred times and worked numerous different lighting techniques across a wide range of drills. In short, they got massive reps in, and just like crushing massive reps in the gym, the result on the range was massive gains.





    Then it was on to working in and around vehicles, which began with a ballistic demonstration, where students were able to fire a wide variety of training and carry ammunition through the windshield of one of the training vehicles in order to see how it performed against a set of targets simulating "threats". Again, the experience was enlightening, as all bullets are not created equal and many are far better than others. Understanding the "why" behind this type of ballistic demonstration (what different types of bullets will do entering and exiting glass) is crucially important.





    From there we moved on to individual and then team drills from and around the vehicles during the day, conducting reaction to frontal and side ambushes. Through multiple repetitions, the students learned how to quickly access their pistols and begin engaging threats from within the vehicle then efficiently and safely exit the vehicles and then fight from the side, under and rear of the vehicles.







    When night fell, we took the handheld and weapon mounted light skills we worked on the first night and then applied them to vehicle drills we had just completed, understanding the adjustments in techniques/tactics that must be made because of how our own lights and the lighting around us comes into play. Again, its another eye opening period for the students, as you simply cannot replicate this through watching it in a video or reading it in a book. It must be experienced, where successes and failure are made, for it to really sink in and for learning to occur and skill progression to be completed.



    As just another way to minimize downtime during training and allow the students to get maximum reps in, we split the class in half, so that we could simultaneous run individual low light/no light skill drills on one range while also conducting vehicle drills on the other and then rotating in a series or "round robin" drills.



    We finished of the second night, and course, with a special, "surprise" drill that each student completed by themselves, rolling many of the skills learned throughout the weekend into one final test. Again, a crowd favorite.

    Then it was back to the classroom in order to conduct a through debrief and pass out certificates and patches. The debrief is key, as it serves first as a bookend to the introduction each student presented at the beginning of the course, where they provided their goals and expectations for training. Almost always those goals are generalized, like "I want to become more confident in my draw" or "I hope to become proficient with my handheld light". Then, during the debrief, the responses are usually along the line of, "I accomplished my goals in the first few drills" or "I thought I was pretty good and had this stuff down and now I realize how much I don't know".

    Additionally, the debrief confirms for us, through the smiles and laughter from exhausted bodies, that each and every student was pushed beyond their comfort zone and that is where learning occurs. And it shows us both that we're providing the right "formula" and where we can sustain and improve for future courses.



    So, to wrap this up, I must begin by thanking all of the students for making the commitment to train with us and better themselves, for allowing us to share this knowledge and experience with them all and for being such great friends; least of which is evident by the "perfect" class gift they presented me. And yes, I went to Sheetz and put my whole face in it.



    And for all of those of you who may be reading this and realizing that a training course like this is something you're interested in, follow Teufelshund Tactical on social media and through the website for updates on future courses, or hit me up with questions. We look forward to getting after it again soon.
    Last edited by Marine0303; 11-25-2019 at 05:41 PM.
    Saab95v6, J0hnny, waz0wski and 6 others like this.
    SF,

    James

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    Heckler and Koch Pistol, Submachine Gun and Rifle Instructor (Singleton International)

    Owner, Teufelshund Tactical

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    Thank You for the AAR , your classes are always excellent . I will look forward to a summer 2020 PCC class !!!!
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    Thank you again James and Ben for offering such a comprehensive class. The amount of personal gains is just immeasurable. Absolutely can’t wait to see the next available class, I’m already looking for where to sign up.
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    @Marine0303

    What pistol were you carrying on pic 15... with wood grips? P7????

    Nice write up....thanks for the detailed info. I look forward to attending one in the future.

    Cheers!!!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad4065 View Post
    @Marine0303

    What pistol were you carrying on pic 15... with wood grips? P7????

    Nice write up....thanks for the detailed info. I look forward to attending one in the future.

    Cheers!!!!
    Good eyes. Its a Walther P88 Compact with Nill grips. A real laser beam of a shooter.
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    SF,

    James

    Heckler and Koch Certified Armorer (Heckler and Koch)
    Heckler and Koch Pistol, Submachine Gun and Rifle Instructor (Singleton International)

    Owner, Teufelshund Tactical

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    Wow that is awesome. The training we receive from the sheriff's department is laughable in comparison!
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    An outstanding time as always. I honestly think this was the best class yet, 110% with all the reps, I like the look of leather holsters, but moving to kydex.

    No question that I'll be back again, looking forward to and planning already.
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    Dammit, missed out again because I got out of the habit of checking here. Do you have an email list or something I can sign up for? :P

    Anxiously awaiting a subgun and/or rifle course, but I wouldn't say no to a pistol either. Do you have prerequisites for your more advanced classes? The only 'formal' training I've got at this point was the concealed carry class and your excellent but very brief instruction at the last HK day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GraveDigger78 View Post
    Wow that is awesome. The training we receive from the sheriff's department is laughable in comparison!
    Yep, over years of providing training to LE and civilians, I'm rarely impressed with LE training.
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    SF,

    James

    Heckler and Koch Certified Armorer (Heckler and Koch)
    Heckler and Koch Pistol, Submachine Gun and Rifle Instructor (Singleton International)

    Owner, Teufelshund Tactical

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    Quote Originally Posted by Klaustrophobia View Post
    Dammit, missed out again because I got out of the habit of checking here. Do you have an email list or something I can sign up for? :P

    Anxiously awaiting a subgun and/or rifle course, but I wouldn't say no to a pistol either. Do you have prerequisites for your more advanced classes? The only 'formal' training I've got at this point was the concealed carry class and your excellent but very brief instruction at the last HK day.
    I post upcoming training here in my vendor section, on the training page of my website and on my company Facebook and Instagram account.
    I'll be posting 2020 courses as they form.
    Advanced courses include low light/no light training and are more rapid in their progression. Basic courses are more grounded in the fundamentals. If you're not proficient, you'll want the basic courses.
    GraveDigger78 likes this.
    SF,

    James

    Heckler and Koch Certified Armorer (Heckler and Koch)
    Heckler and Koch Pistol, Submachine Gun and Rifle Instructor (Singleton International)

    Owner, Teufelshund Tactical

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