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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can someone list the abreviations and meanings that are commonly used. I see alot of them being used but have no clue what many of them mean. I figured being a rookie this is the place to ask...

FTF - Failure to fire
FTE - ?
SBR - Short Barrel Rifle?
BBL - Barrel


etc. etc.
 

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FTE = Failure to eject
USPf = USP full size
USPc = USP Compact
USP CT = USP Compact Tactical
IIRC = If I Recall Correctly
IMHO = In My Honest Opinion
FMJ = Full Metal Jacket (jacketed bullet)
HP = Hollow Point
JHP = Jacketed Hollow Point
GICAYS = Give IronChef All Your Stuff :D
 

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FTF also means "face-to-face" when used in sellers lingo.
 

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FTF can be both FT feed and FT fire. That is why I always use FTFeed or FTFire if there can be any confusion.
Also, there is no need to put the "f" after USP to indicate full size. Most old hats to the HK game use USP for the full size and USPC for the Compact since Compact is part of the pistol's name. Still, some still like to put the "f" after USP to clarify but it is rather redundant, like repeating one's self, saying the same thing over and over. ;)
 

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Dont forget:

YMMV = Your mileage may vary
EBR = Evil black rifle (ARs, AKs, and the like)
SWC = Semi wadcutter (type of .45ACP ammo like FMJ or JHP)
+P — Plus P (10-15% overpressure)
+P+ — Plus P Plus (20-25% overpressure)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks everyone... Keep them coming for all the newbies.

Also since LAzarusbrought up the +P and +P+, i understand that they are more pressure than standard, but I also notice that some manufacturers seem to have more "punch" than others and are not labeled +P or +P+. So are those markings only relative to that particular manufacturer comparing against their own standard non +P ammo?
 

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Merchant of Death (Admin)
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AFAIK- As far as I know
FUBAR- Umm, Google it
AYBABTU- All your base are belong to us (again, Google)
SWMBO- She who must be obeyed (the one who really controls spending)
RSO- Range safety officer; can be a help or a jerk... depends
CHL- Concealed handgun license
30.06- A legally defined sign that prevents a CHL holder from carrying at a specific place in Texas
TRB- Tap, rack, bang... a malfunction drill
 

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Thanks everyone... Keep them coming for all the newbies.

Also since LAzarusbrought up the +P and +P+, i understand that they are more pressure than standard, but I also notice that some manufacturers seem to have more "punch" than others and are not labeled +P or +P+. So are those markings only relative to that particular manufacturer comparing against their own standard non +P ammo?
Exactly. No universal standard has ever been established.
 

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FTE can be either Failure To Extract or Failure To Eject. Either one is indicative of different problems.
 

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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
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That is one reason why I write everything out most of the time. Something can have a couple meanings. FTF failure to feed, Failure to fire. Two completely different problems FTe failure to eject, failure to extract again..... well, you get the idea.
 

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Can someone explain the difference between failure to extract and failure to eject when talking about spent casings? I understand a mag can fail to eject from the firearm but as far as the casing failing to eject and the extractor failing to extract means the same to me.
 

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Can someone explain the difference between failure to extract and failure to eject when talking about spent casings? I understand a mag can fail to eject from the firearm but as far as the casing failing to eject and the extractor failing to extract means the same to me.
I assume that a failure to extract means that the round is not pulled from the chamber
 

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Can someone explain the difference between failure to extract and failure to eject when talking about spent casings? I understand a mag can fail to eject from the firearm but as far as the casing failing to eject and the extractor failing to extract means the same to me.
The "extractor" is the piece of metal (under spring force) that grasps onto the rim of the shell casing and, when after having been fired, pulls that casing out of the chamber when the slide or bolt comes out of battery. When the slide or bolt comes back far enough, the rear end of the casing encounters an object that is known as the "ejector", which serves to knock the casing out of the grasp of the extractor and imparts a force to it that causes the casing to exit the weapon through ejection port.

Extraction and Ejection are two distinctly different processes and failure of either can lead to differing problems. For instance, if the extractor fails, you could end up with a shell casing lodged in the chamber, while if the ejector fails, you might end up with a stovepipe or a double-feed. Get it? Got it? Good. ;)
 

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Ok, what does BTT stand for
Bump To Top... for getting your WTS or WTB ads back up on the first page.

And here's one I haven't seen yet...

NIB - New In Box
 
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