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Teufelshund Tactical
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This past weekend, we completed another successful round of Teufelshund Tactical training courses. As it has come to be standard practice, I have assembled my thoughts, photos and videos into an After Action Report to post here, so that those who attended will have a reference point come back to and so those that did not attend will be able to see all the fun and excellent training they’ve been missing.

Let me begin by thanking Paul and his Frontline Defense staff, for once again hosting this training at his outstanding range complex. Having such extensive access and support allows us to really stretch the boundaries of our training far beyond what most classes can provide and we are immensely grateful for the freedom that provides. If you’re in North Carolina and looking for excellent training opportunities or just a place to shoot like you can’t anywhere else, I highly recommend you check out Frontline Defense and the courses that Paul offers.

Pistol, Rifle, & Shotgun Outdoor Shooting Range Warrenton NCFrontline Defense | Firearms Training Center & Range



Just “getting there” is always a crucial element each course and training at Frontline Defense would not be complete without a stop at our favorite sponsor, Sheetz. You can always count on there being great snack food options, ice for the cooler and an array of questionable and shady customers milling about to max out your daily dose of “people watching”.



Our training consisted of a Pistol Operator Course, followed by a Rifle Operator Course, over a period of three days. The goal of both was to provide an in-depth and rapid progression of the fundamentals (establishing a new and proper baseline) while constantly stacking a specific set of sequential drills, designed to increase performance (speed and accuracy) and proficiency (confidence and instinctual abilities). Progression from focus on the individual to teams (increasing situational awareness), as well as a solid exposure to working around barriers and vehicles and lighting techniques, provided the opportunity for students to push themselves into real world scenarios of operating in both day and night.

Being able to wrap so much into such a short period of time takes a huge amount of preparation, experience, skill and knowledge in training design, as well as how to best approach students individually instead of as a whole. Each person learns differently and when introducing new concepts, often counter to hard-learned experience, being able to do so while connecting personally with each student in a manner that allows them to understand the “why” behind each topic, while keeping them comfortable, positive and motivated about rapid progression, is proudly one of the major strengths that Teufelshund Tactical brings to the game. Combining that capability with the small class sizes that we like to maintain and the result is a level of focused attention and personal support to each student rarely matched in the training business. The byproduct of this and the efficiency and the rapid gains students make is that they also get to shoot more than during most courses. “Getting your reps in” is what assimilates a drill/technique into a muscle memory operation and where in some training courses, the class may only have time to try each once or twice, here we have far more opportunities, and the ability to go back and run another again, if desired or necessary.

We began the Pistol Operator Course, as we do with all our training, by having each student provide an introduction, including a description of the goals they aim to achieve from the training course. Then, we dive right in. Right onto the firing line we went and conducted an initial CET, beginning at 3m and working back to 25m. This provides an initial assessment of where the students are at that point and we can observe the experience levels that they brought with them. Then, we capture the results of the drill on the target with our camera for reference later during the training, after we shoot the same drill. Then the students are able to witness the dramatic improvements made in just a few short hours of dedicated and focused skill progression.







With the initial CET complete, we began at very close range, focusing first on building a solid foundation, from the feet all the way up through the hands to the pistol. Not until the foundation is confirmed do we move on to eyes and then trigger control. As we progressed, speed and accuracy began to build, along with confidence. Specifically, we built speed, both from the “low ready” and then from the holster, by not going fast, but instead by slowing down. By the numbers, we then deliberately began cutting our time restrictions down until smoothness became natural and speed was simply a byproduct.

Here, Ben provides a Proactive Reload demonstration:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDl5OH65T5Q



Reloads, malfunction clearances, and then movement were then introduced. Then, before daylight faded, we moved over to the second training bay which had been dedicated for our use and conducted vehicle operations; both front and side vehicle ambush scenarios.

After a break for dinner and a block of instruction on the fundamentals of darkness operations and lighting techniques, we moved back out onto the range to move through a series of darkness drills. We began by conducting a mesopic CET, where the students fired in the darkness, without lights, confirming their instinctual abilities and the confidence that comes from trusting them and just using your night sights. Next, we progressed through searching and shooting drills, first with hand-held lights and then with weapon mounted lights. Then, we added movement. And finally, we transitioned over to the vehicle training bay again and covered the vehicle ambush drills in darkness.

After almost 12 hours of training, we wrapped up the evening with a thorough debrief, covering “sustains and improves” and goal attainment from each student. Then, after providing graduation certificates and an appropriate level of SWAG, we retired for the evening, in order to prepare for the next day’s events.

On Saturday morning, we formed again. This time, we began with a confirmation zero for our carbines, and with that set, we began again with an initial CET. Then, progressing through a series of similar drills as with the pistol the previous day, we progressed rapidly through these stacked drills, building speed and accuracy along the way.



After working through a few movement drills, we spent the rest of the afternoon covering team drills in and around the vehicles on the second training bay.

Here, I provide a demonstration with Ben of the Vehicle Ambush Drill from the side:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJINXWXZz1Y



Then, after dinner and another block of instruction on darkness operations and lighting techniques, we ran through similar no light/low light drills as the previous night, but this time incorporating rifles with weapon mounted lights. Adding movement, we then finished off the evening back on the vehicles for team front and side ambush drills. Another debrief and then it was off to catch some much needed rest before the final day of training.





For the last day, we began on the 300m range for one of my favorite confidence drills, the “walk back”. Beginning at the 50m line, we formed a line and then, taking a shot from your position in the line and then moving back to your next position at the back of the line for the follow on shot, we progressively moved back all the way to the 300m line. The goal is to get a first round hit at each position from the standing, unsupported position, and you’re not able to move back until you make a hit, regardless of how many rounds that may take. Of course, I was proud of all of the students, as you could see and hear (as the rounds impacted the steel) that all the hard work on fundamentals forged at close range the previous day, was now paying off at distance, where even the smallest failure to adhere to fundamental work can result in missing the target completely.









Personally, during this event, I was incredibly impressed with the weapon I was using for this drill. I had just taken possession of a new G36C only a couple of days prior and this weekend was my first time to get it zeroed and run through its paces. I know many of you have heard all of the rumors and hyperbole about the inaccuracy of the G36 series weapons, but I can tell you that is a bunch of nonsense. This weapon, with its 8.9” barrel, milspec trigger and only quickly zeroed Aimpoint T-1 red dot optic produced first round hits on every firing position (over 40 in all) except one, from the 50m to 300m line. The one time it did not, was completely on me, due to adjusting to wind and rushing the shot (it took me three rounds). Between the accuracy displayed there and the reliability demonstrated throughout the weekend, I can tell you that I am extremely impressed with the G36C; so much so, that I purchased a G36K and arranged for the transfer the next day.

Here, I provide a Slow Motion Demonstration of the G36C taken during the course:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7WOTy2DfsZ8

And not to be outdone, here Ben provides a Slow Motion Demonstration of the HK416 as well:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFrZ0IOpKyw

Before moving back to the original training bay, we conducted one more drill, focused on speed, accuracy and forward movement, on the 300m range. Then, we spent the remainder of the day working through reload and malfunction drills and culminating on a couple of movement drills and finally the Teufelshund Tactical CET, which would more appropriately be referred to as “the humbler”.







We then wrapped up the weekend by again conducting a debrief, passing out graduation certificates and associated SWAG. Knocking down goals, seeing huge gains in proficiency and performance and setting new goals, while having a great time with outstanding friends makes all the hard work worthwhile.

I have to say that it is personally extremely humbling to have the opportunity to provide this training and share this knowledge. Even more so when you see such dedication on behalf of our students. I continue to be overwhelmed to have so many returning students. In fact, of those who were there for the Rifle Operator Course, every single one had already attended one of our previous courses this year, and for Sean specifically, I’ve almost lost count of how many courses he has attended with us. That level of support to our training programs is far uncommon in the training community, shows us we are on the right track with what we are doing and motivates us to continue to improve and adapt our training programs; always focusing on process improvements and the needs of the customer.

So, with great thanks to the level of commitment displayed by all our students and friends, and once again to Frontline Defense, we look forward to the next opportunity to share the firing line with you.

And for those others who may take the time to read through this After Action Report, I trust it will educate you to the great opportunity that training like this offers, from learning more about your weapons, building a foundation of proper shooting techniques, pushing yourself further than you’ve been able to previously and making friendships with a like-minded and motely group of HK fans. We hope you’ll join us for a training in 2017.

Lastly, channeling my best inner-HK ITD, here I proudly represent H&K:

 

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Absolutely fantastic AAR as usual James. I was
interested how the carbine course would turn out.
Your G36C is a great addition to the TT arsenal.It wad impressive to see so many returning students
from our March Pistol/SMG course! I cannot
wait to attend another course in 2017! Happy upcoming Holidays to everyone and there families.
 

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This was my third class with James and Ben. Sadly, I would have liked to have taken the pistol class again but just couldn't work out getting the time off. Wow, what an experience. For me, the training in the vehicles was the high light of the course. Unfortunately, I got too caught up with the HK specific part and brought a rifle that was not ready for this level of training yet. For those of you that don't have an HK specific rifle, if that is what is holding you back from this training...don't let it. While James has targeted HK product use, if you don't have an HK, "bring what you got". The training is what is most important. I think the problem with my rifle will be an easy fix, but flying caused me to leave my spare parts at home. I now know, it is more important to bring a reliable set up than a HK type set up. My brother was kind enough to let me use his back up rifle. It had a Miculek style brake. That made the night shooting exceptionally challenging. Brakes are great for fair weather training in bright sun light. I lost all low light vision after the first round of the night training.

Most of the training I received before starting to train with TT was individual orientated. One shooter at a time would run each drill or each shooter was lined up doing the same thing at the same time. I think it is so cool to train with another shooter that I was interacting with. Training with another shooter is a whole other level. How to communicate and think about your roles together. The biggest thing I took from that is planning movement and mag changes/weapons use. If the other guy is getting his gun or changing mags, I need to be laying down covering fire. That way there is always fire coming from my team. Personally I was amazed that this class wasn't maxed out. But for the students that were there everyone seemed to love the extra reps and individual instructor technique. With the small class size, I found it hard to keep up with just loading mags because we got to shoot so much.

Thank you James and thank you Ben. This was by far my best rifle training experience I have had. While I was hard on myself, looking back I feel so fortunate for the experience. I definitely want to take this class again. But this time I'll bring 100 loaded mags and two rifles I know run 100%. They might not be HK associated, but I'll be sure and bring the Mark 23 for my handgun. Something I have learned in the firearm realm, take advantage while it is there. I don't know of anywhere else that such training is available to civilians. If you are thinking, "I'll get around to it after...", it might not be there. Life happens. There is no way to predict the future. I hope you can "make it happen" now and join me in the next carbine class.

Scott
 

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Guys, What a amazing group of students. Everyone pushed themselves to the limits and past in some cases which was truly motivational!! The gains made from the first CET to the second in both the pistol and carbine class was phenomenal!! Was proud to be apart of it. Thanks for everyones support of TT and hope to see everyone soon. The 2017 schedule is coming together nicely and will be up soon. i think some folks from different parts of the country are going to be super stoked to see where we land!! Take Care-get on the range!! Ben
 

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I Bleed Urban Gray
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Awesome AAR for the best HK training for civilians in the country. James & Ben - congrats on your inaugural Rifle Operator Course! What isn't mentioned in the AAR is the amount of time and effort you guys spend in designing & preparing the course content. Looking forward to the 2017 schedule!
 

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I attended the 21 October pistol course and thoroughly enjoyed myself. This was my first experience with this type of training, and James and Ben were great about helping me identify and address the things that I was doing wrong, and their encouragement was most appreciated. I had to drop out before the night and car exercises, but nevertheless learned a tremendous amount in an amazingly short time, and I would recommend the pistol class to anyone at any level of proficiency. My thanks to James and Ben and the other guys in the class for an enjoyable and challenging day of training.
 

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Let me start by saying this was my second extended weekend training with James and Ben. The first was in March 2016 attending the Pistol and Subgun Courses. This time around it was both the Pistol and Carbine Courses. I am just as amazed by the training style they employed this time around as I was in March. Just as Scott stated, to all of you out there take advantage of these training opportunities while they exist. You won’t find this training and individual attention anywhere else. With that said, my AAC will not rehash what James has posted, the step by step training, I will try to stick to the highlights of my experience.

After the March Courses I was a much better shooter but I could not repeat my course performance no matter how much I tried. This time around I realized that I need to start each range day the way we start in the courses, warm-up drills utilizing CET techniques and targets. It really helps bring you back to “Feeling Right” in your technique.

In the Pistol Course I was most impressed by the opportunity to undertake nighttime work. This entailed demonstrations of 4 light techniques and then the opportunity to practice them. As I state above, the training regimen really brings you back to what James calls Knowing Right and Feeling Right and developing natural shooting postures. The nighttime drills showed me that I was in that Feeling Right Zone. My USP .40 S&W has Tritium sites that were installed upon my original purchase in 1993. One of the rear dots was burned out. During the mesopic CET drills I was able to consistently hit the target out to the 15 meter line despite not having working sites. That really shows how far I had come from the start of the course earlier that morning.

As for the Carbine course there were two major highlights: daytime and night time barrier and vehicle drills and the walk back drill from 50 yards to 300 yards. The barrier drills were great to practice movement with reloads. It is a great confidence boost when you get a smooth rhythm down and are hearing the steel ping and the seeing holes form in the paper targets while you are on the move. This seems to have been our practice before we advanced to the vehicles. You can see a demo of one of the drills on TT’s YouTube page. The pics in James’ AAC demo them well. Lastly, I was really psyched to complete the 300 yards walk back. My shooting was consistent and smooth; if I recall correctly I only missed 3 times on the first shot and I shot over 30 rounds.

With my highlights completed I wanted to add a note about my rifle set up. I used a H&K MR556 lower with a Geissele 556 Trigger and a H&K 416A5 Slimline Butt Stock. The upper is a H&K AF 416 10.4” Upper with a RAHG, a Magpul AFG, Vickers BlueForce 2 point sling and an Inforce Tactical Light. The scope is an Elcan Spectre DR 1-4 scope See pic in this link for basic set up when the PDW stock was installed.



I cannot say enough great things about the Elcan scope. It was dead on at 300 yard using the BDC reticle and the red chevron at the center was perfect during a bright and shiny North Carolina Blue Autumn Day. This set-up performed flawlessly for me until the second day when my castle nut loosened and the butt stock went sideways. I had placed an HKParts PDW stock on the rifle in June and had it swapped out for the original buffer tube and the slimeline stock in September. However, the castle nut had apparently not been torqued to correct H&K specs causing the above issue. I bring this up just make two points: 1) make sure your weapons and gear are truly GTG before you arrive at a course and 2) make sure your weapons are maintained according to manufacturer specs — USE A H&K AMOROR like James.

If you play your cards right and send your firearms back with James for work to be performed you don't have to clean them. :150000: After firing 1000 rounds in 1 day through a USP .40, I am just glad its being taken a part by James to have LEM kit installed. :6200:

Thanks Again Ben and James - I will certainly be back and I hope you'll consider an Intermediate Carbine Course in the future!!!
 

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Teufelshund Tactical
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the awesome feedback, guys. Most importantly, we appreciate you making the commitment.
It truly is a pleasure to be able to offer this training to you and when we see the rapid gains you make and the smiles on your exhausted faces at the end, it makes all the effort worthwhile. We look forward to seeing you all back again soon.
 
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