HKPRO Forums banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is there some one among us that knows why HK USP's have never had an ambidexterous slide release option or the P2000 series for that matter?

Maybe it's my personal hang up with pistols, but I'm of the opinion if a semi-auto hand gun is without this option, I'm not interested.

May be a noob question, if so I apologize in adavance.

Thanks,

J.T.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,541 Posts
Using the slide stop as a release is an inefficient technique. Cycle the slide. Faster. More positive. Learn to operate the pistol by taking a professional course.

-- Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
854 Posts
Ummmm...why is this such an important option? Are you a lefty?

Maybe it's my personal hang up with pistols, but I'm of the opinion if a semi-auto hand gun is without this option, I'm not interested
Kinda sucks that you are gonna miss out on USP, USPc, P7s, MK23...anything made by Springfield Armory....Steyr's M-series...and forget Glocks aren't a big loss....but your 'requirement' closes a lot more doors than it opens....your money tho
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,970 Posts
Using the slide stop as a release is an inefficient technique. Cycle the slide. Faster. More positive. Learn to operate the pistol by taking a professional course.

-- Chuck
Chuck, you are the master of charm and discretion.

JTC, the USP was designed and marketed well before the P2000, P30, HK45, etc which all have ambi slide release. At the time it was designed, HK either hadn't thought of it yet or just didn't feel the need for it. It was a fair question, and no need to apologize for asking it.

The slide release comes in pretty handy when you want or need to release the slide with one hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,588 Posts
Just use your trigger finger when shooting lefty if you must use the release, but I grab&rack everytime
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,862 Posts
The slide release comes in pretty handy when you want or need to release the slide with one hand.
I agree. I actually brought the modern HK's because I have a pinched nerve and my thought was "What if I have to learn how to shoot left handed". As far as what Chuck S said... I don't know if it cycles the slide faster, I mean the gun's internals are doing the same thing if you cycle the slide (after slide lock) or push down the slide release but I will say that cycling the slide or power stroking or racking the slide etc. is a more effecient way to operate. At least that's my opinion, every move you make is a step towards a new habit and TRB is the gospel to me... I wouldn't want to accidently push down the slide release if I experience slide lock due to a malfunction. But I'm getting too far off topic... Having ambi slide releases on a gun is like my 4WD truck having ESP traction control, I may never use it but it never hurts to have... only helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
854 Posts
I agree. I actually brought the modern HK's because I have a pinched nerve and my thought was "What if I have to learn how to shoot left handed". As far as what Chuck S said... I don't know if it cycles the slide faster, I mean the gun's internals are doing the same thing if you cycle the slide (after slide lock) or push down the slide release but I will say that cycling the slide or power stroking or racking the slide etc. is a more effecient way to operate. At least that's my opinion, every move you make is a step towards a new habit and TRB is the gospel to me... I wouldn't want to accidently push down the slide release if I experience slide lock due to a malfunction. But I'm getting too far off topic... Having ambi slide releases on a gun is like my 4WD truck having ESP traction control, I may never use it but it never hurts to have... only helps.
I guess I look at it as a great additional option--if it exists...I'm not going to completely write off a design simply because it doesn't have an option that the overwhelming majority of designs lack...that's just ludicrous...the originalt post borders on smelling fishy to me, but OP can spend his money on what he wants, its his own options he is limiting....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,673 Posts
I'm left handed and I just use my trigger finger to release the slide. Same thing on the AR. It's a stretch on some guns but I have big hands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,277 Posts
Slide release technique has never let me down... And I've shot a little bit now and again... I even tried to transition to a more 'modern, efficient' technique... And everytime I tried, the slide was already forward, my thumb having done what it's learned over 15 years of shooting, and yes, I tried for a good three months before sticking with what works for me.

Much faster IMO.

YMMV
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
I'm a lefty that prefers ambidextrous controls on a pistol.

I find releasing a slide with the slide release is faster, as well as locking the slide open with my left-hand thumb.

If any slide "release", with serrations on the top of it, fails to load a round into the chamber after slide-lock, then there is something wrong with the pistol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Using the slide stop as a release is an inefficient technique. Cycle the slide. Faster. More positive. Learn to operate the pistol by taking a professional course.

-- Chuck

Hey Chuck,

I didn't intend to imply that I wold never own a hand gun if it didn't have ambidexterous slide release, actually, I did own a USP 9mm. Sold it, in the hopes of purchasing HK hk.45, soon. I can see how my comment could lead to that conclusion.

I did attend and passd a CCW class. Which my CCW weapon IS a HK P2000/sk .357sig. Although that's probably NOT the type of training you're referring to, that upholds proper hand gun technique, I did learn quite a bit, and have been getting a lot help from guys at the range, and new found friends that enjoy shooting. I was just curious why the USP had never had an AMBI option. I bought the .357sig after I bought my P30L, and just fell in love with the versatility. Since I have never had any previous training prior to owning my P30L, I don't have any previously learned or memorized steps while reloading, there's a huge difference when you're not requred to use two hands while reloading, (other than to load the magazine) - call improper or not, it's a great advantage.

On another somewhat off topic but in response to Chuck's reply, while shooting in a competition (among friends) moving through multiple stages with, moving targets, with 3-clips, 8 rounds in each, not once did I ever even have to release the slide to chamber nor rack the slide! Why? well I thought all of (or most) of us HK fans knew that for some reason, when you use the butt of your palm when loading the next magazine, bumping the bottom of the grip, the slide drops automatically and chambers the next round. This is why I LOVE HK's. My P30L does as well as the USP 9mm I had. My .357sig will, but not nearly as smoothly. No other pistol I know of will do this. Whether HK's are designed to do this or not, the fact is IT DOES, and saves precious time. I was shooting against guys far more experienced than I, shooting 1911's, Taurus, etc. and simply blew them away on time. All 1911 guys were jamming, having a lot trouble racking their slide and getting back on target. I simply stayed on target, dropped mag, replaced and started shooting again, mostlty on target. One friend was so jealous, went and purchased a HK hk 45 with a month for this very reason. They simply could not believe it was possible and though I had done something the pistol to make it happen (not hardly!)

To another posters point, yes I do enjoy shooting left hand, (quite a bit) although I'm right handed. I went through the course shooting left and right hand, with very close times, but better accuracy right handed. I'm of the opinion it's a very good idea to be proficient shooting with either hand, cause you never know, and having that option to me is important.

Anyways, I had forgotten the P2000 series were Ambi, but you don't see many at gun shows, or in the shops, mostly USP's.


J.T.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
854 Posts
Hey Chuck,

I didn't intend to imply that I wold never own a hand gun if it didn't have ambidexterous slide release, actually, in fact, I (do) and did own a USP 9mm. Sold it, in the hopes of purchasing HK hk.45, soon. I can see how my comment could lead to that conclusion.

I did attend and passd a CCW class. Which my CCW weapon IS a HK USP/sk .357sig. Although that's probably NOT the type of training you're referring to, that upholds proper hand gun technique, I did learn quite a bit, and have been getting a lot help from guys at the range, and new found friends that enjoy shooting. I was just curious why the USP had never had an AMBI option. I bought the .357sig after I bought my P30L, and just fell in love with the versatility. Since I have never had any previous training prior to owning my P30L, I don't have any previously learned or memorized steps while reloading, there's a huge difference when you're not requred to use two hands while reloading, call improper or not, it's a great advantage.

On another somewhat off topic but in response to Chuck's reply, while shooting in a competition (among friends) moving through multiple stages with, moving targets, with 3-clips, 8 rounds in each, not once did I ever even have to release the slide to chamber nor rack the slide! Why? well I thought all of (or most) of us HK fans knew that for some reason, when you use the butt of your palm when loading the next magazine, bumping the bottom of the grip, the slide drops automatically and chambers the next round. This is why I LOVE HK's. My P30L does as well as the USP 9mm I had. My .357sig will, but not nearly as smoothly. No other pistol I know of will do this. Whether HK's are designed to do this or not, the fact is IT DOES, and saves precious time. I was shooting against guys far more experienced than I, shooting 1911's, Taurus, etc. and simply blew them away on time. All 1911 guys were jamming, having a lot trouble racking their slide and getting back on target. I simply stayed on target, dropped mag, replaced and started shooting again, mostlty on target. One friend was so jealous, went and purchased a HK hk 45 with a month for this very reason. They simply could not believe it was possible and though I had done something the pistol to make it happen (not hardly!)

To another posters point, yes I do enjoy shooting left hand, (quite a bit) although I'm right handed. I went through the course shooting left and right hand, with very close times, but better accuracy right handed. I'm of the opinion it's a very good idea to be proficient shooting with either hand, cause you never know, and having that option to me is important.

Anyways, I had forgotten the P2000 series were Ambi, but you don't see many at gun shows, or in the shops, mostly USP's.


J.T.
Ok...1) modern semi-auto firearms use magazines ...clips go in bolt-action military arms (98K Mausers/Mosin-Nagant etc)...yes there IS a difference and it is important to know they aren't interchangable terms...we have enough stigma surrounding our hobby, don't add to it please...
2) 'bumping' your slide with your magazine is a TERRIBLE tactic...you are putting additional stress on the magazine as well as internal parts of the slide...firearms are designed to function within specs laid out in the manual...HK over-engineers their guns to be damn near indestructable, its a fact, but building a poor habit will translate to bad bad things happening to 'lesser' offerings...

I do agree that weak-hand proficiency is a very important skill to drill and learn...because you are correct, you never know...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,342 Posts
Using the slide stop as a release is an inefficient technique. Cycle the slide. Faster. More positive. Learn to operate the pistol by taking a professional course.

-- Chuck
yes and no. If your running a glock or some other gun with those tiny slide catches than run the slide if you aren't used to it. If your running an HK, especially a USP with a big beefy slide release than utilize it. Personally I don't think HK would make their slide releases as large they do if they were just to be relegated to catching the slide. Op use what is most comfy to you. I use the slide release on all my guns, glocks included (install larger slide catch). It's all about repetition. I find using the slide release light years quicker than racking the slide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Using the slide stop to drop the slide is definitely faster. That said, I never do it. When you are adrenalized, fine motor skills cease to function. Running the slide with a strong overhand grip is a technique that requires only gross motor skills, and it is therefore easier to do in a life threatening situation.

If you are training only to play gun games, then using the slide release is probably better. I tailor my pistol craft for self defense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
854 Posts
Using the slide stop to drop the slide is definitely faster. That said, I never do it. When you are adrenalized, fine motor skills cease to function. Running the slide with a strong overhand grip is a technique that requires only gross motor skills, and it is therefore easier to do in a life threatening situation.

If you are training only to play gun games, then using the slide release is probably better. I tailor my pistol craft for self defense.
This is an EXCELLENT point I hadn't thought about...train how you will fight...
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top