HKPRO Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just curious. I saw where Grumpy was going to have it done but didn't hear whether it actually was or not. Also saw where Jayson from IGF was looking into offering it.

Reason I ask is that there is a lot of conflicting info out there on the different surface treatments, namely one form or another of nitriding. The MR556 barrels (like most firearms) are test-fired at the factory. Since surface conversions are *supposed* to be done on, shall we say, "virgin" steel, some have said that it wouldn't be 100% successful if done on an already-fired bore. Also, the finish is supposed to be rather rough inside the bore after treatment resulting in the need for some kind of lapping or polishing (?).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
590 Posts
I am going to leave mine untreated and shoot the **** out of it everytime. I will clean afterwards everytime as I do all my guns. If it starts to rust, I will let others know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
Just curious. I saw where Grumpy was going to have it done but didn't hear whether it actually was or not. Also saw where Jayson from IGF was looking into offering it.

Reason I ask is that there is a lot of conflicting info out there on the different surface treatments, namely one form or another of nitriding. The MR556 barrels (like most firearms) are test-fired at the factory. Since surface conversions are *supposed* to be done on, shall we say, "virgin" steel, some have said that it wouldn't be 100% successful if done on an already-fired bore. Also, the finish is supposed to be rather rough inside the bore after treatment resulting in the need for some kind of lapping or polishing (?).
It's actually a bad idea to treat an unfired barrel. The treatment has to be applied to CLEAN (perfectly clean) steel, however, if you treat an unfired barrel, you're treating any burrs that are present during machining, meaning that the barrel will take forever to break in if you treat it first (since you'll be hardening the burrs). Shoot it, let the plasma do its work and remove the burrs, breaking in the barrel, and then clean it well and treat it.

-W
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
879 Posts
Mine's in transit to H&M. Sent in for the QPQ nitriding process which involves Quenching the parts in the nitriding solution, Polishing them, then Quenching them again, hence the name, QPQ (Quench Polish Quench). The double dipping with the removal of the oxydization layer between quenchings allows deeper penetration into the surface of the steel and increases hardness. It's one of the best nitride processes avalible on the market today.

Needless to say, i'm REALLY looking forward to getting this gun finished. I'm going to parkerize the parts after I get them back so they look like they did when I first got them, then re-assemble and test fire. This will be the completion of a really fun project for me.

As the man says, I love it when a plan comes together!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,464 Posts
It's actually a bad idea to treat an unfired barrel. The treatment has to be applied to CLEAN (perfectly clean) steel, however, if you treat an unfired barrel, you're treating any burrs that are present during machining, meaning that the barrel will take forever to break in if you treat it first (since you'll be hardening the burrs).
If there are burrs in unfired cold hammer forged barrel bore, that means something seriously gone south during hammering or mandrel was faulty. There is no place for cutting tool marks or burrs in CHF barrel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
Correct, Montrala.

It wouldn't hurt to lap the bore or have it professionally done after cleaning it thoroughly and then prepping it for QPQ process.

It may require re-lapping a bit once done, too...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
879 Posts
Correct, Montrala.

It wouldn't hurt to lap the bore or have it professionally done after cleaning it thoroughly and then prepping it for QPQ process.

It may require re-lapping a bit once done, too...
I did a minor hand lapping of my barrel.

And it WILL require the oxidization layer to be removed from the bore before shooting it after the nitride process is done. A tedious job, but necessary and worth it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
879 Posts
Why buy a top dollar rifle if you don't trust the engineering behind it?
Who says we don't trust the engineering behind it? Or did you draw the short straw and have to play the daily troll?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
Why buy a top dollar rifle if you don't trust the engineering behind it?
Let's see...

Some have changed:

Pistol Grips
Buttstocks
Trigger Guards
Takedown Pins
Fire Control Group Parts
Iron Sights
Flash Hiders
Forends
Machines the Barrel Profile
Shortened the Barrel
Melonited the Barrel

I think they know something you, sir, do not. To each his or her own. Hopefully, after the modifications the carbine suits THE OWNER. What a thought, eh?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,939 Posts
Why buy a top dollar rifle if you don't trust the engineering behind it?
I often wonder this myself. I have decided to shorten mine. Not because there is anything wrong with the rifle the way it is but I want something more reminiscent of a military design.

To each his own I guess. I just hope modifications done dont lead people to believe they are needed and without it the rifle is less reliable than other competitors. In the civi world there is nothing the MR556 cant take (probably even the military world too)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I often wonder this myself. I have decided to shorten mine. Not because there is anything wrong with the rifle the way it is but I want something more reminiscent of a military design.

To each his own I guess. I just hope modifications done dont lead people to believe they are needed and without it the rifle is less reliable than other competitors. In the civi world there is nothing the MR556 cant take (probably even the military world too)
Here in WA, the same folks who presented legislation to bring sense to our suppressor law, are now trying to bring SBR/SBS back into the fold as well. Once done, MR556 will be the first to get cut! Grumpy, I'm going to PM you a few questions about your project.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
879 Posts
I often wonder this myself. I have decided to shorten mine. Not because there is anything wrong with the rifle the way it is but I want something more reminiscent of a military design.

To each his own I guess. I just hope modifications done dont lead people to believe they are needed and without it the rifle is less reliable than other competitors. In the civi world there is nothing the MR556 cant take (probably even the military world too)
I didn't do any of the mods I've done because of reliability concerns. I bought the upper BECAUSE I expected it to be reliable in the first place.

I did the mods to make it more user friendly (reduce the weight of the barrel, shorten the barrel to make it easier to use in enclosed spaces) and for longevity reasons (nitride the steel parts so that they last a lot longer and I have the firearm to pass on to my children, etc.). Not a single mod has effected the operating system in a manner that adversly changes operation.

The mods have absolutly zero to do with the engineering of the weapon and apparently some folk cannot ascertain the difference between usibility and operational technicalities.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
879 Posts
Here in WA, the same folks who presented legislation to bring sense to our suppressor law, is not trying to bring SBR/SBS back into the fold as well. Once done, MR556 will be the first to get cut! Grumpy, I'm going to PM you a few questions about your project.
No problem. Ask away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
I did the mods to make it more user friendly (reduce the weight of the barrel, shorten the barrel to make it easier to use in enclosed spaces) and for longevity reasons (nitride the steel parts so that they last a lot longer and I have the firearm to pass on to my children, etc.). Not a single mod has effected the operating system in a manner that adversly changes operation.

The mods have absolutly zero to do with the engineering of the weapon and apparently some folk cannot ascertain the difference between usibility and operational technicalities.
Thank you... Especially your last paragraph.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top