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Discussion Starter #1
I've decided that one of the purchases I make with next year's bonus will be an HK Pistol + Suppressor. I know that I could easily do a search on which Suppressor is the best, but what about which HK pistol is the best?

I know that the USP series have the Tactical variant that will take a suppressor, but do the P2000, P30 etc have tactical barrels? Can I put a USP-T barrel in the P2K/P30 if they don't have a tactical version of those pistols?

I'm leaning heavily toward the P30 because I like the grip (saves me from buying a Hogue slip-on) and I especially like the standard mounting rail on the front, but I don't know if there is a tactical version of the P30 that will take a suppressor.

Also, what caliber is the quietest when suppressed, 9mm, .40 or .45? I'm not tied to any one caliber, the goal of this project for me is to get the gun to be as quiet as possible.

Thanks!
 

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If I were seriously interested in suppressing a .22 I'd more likely look at a suppressed Browning Buckmark than at the competing Walther or Ruger.

I already have one of their Standard URX Buckmarks and it is a fantastic little pistol. But as the first URL states, not only is the Buckmark a little harder to give a good cleaning to, but .22 unjacketed ammo is pretty dirty stuff and makes for pretty frequent suppressor cleanings. Or maybe you just shoot it more because the ammo is so cheap :D.

I don't want to totally dismiss this idea though, as the thought of moving the suppressor from a .22 pistol to a bolt or semi .22 rifle is very appealing.
 

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There are several model that come with the threaded barrel but with the P30 just hitting the market good luck in finding something for it right now. I could be wrong but alot of people that ordered just the pistol long ago still haven't even gotten it yet. I think it will be awhile before you see something like a threaded barrel for them in the States. Could be wrong though.
 

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In my limited experience, my vote would be .45 caliber USP/t or USP/ct.. because they are currently available, and I prefer the .45 ACP caliber. My theory would be that because .45 ACP works at lower pressures, it would be a better candidate for suppression than a 9mm, or .40, but I admit that I have only experienced a supressed .45 USP/t, and not the other two calibers. (my brother in law owns the gun, not me)

I'd REALLY like to see a HK45c with a suppressor!! I think that will come in time.

My experience was that the suppressed .45 sounded more like a .22 and was borderline on weather I would use ear protection (I did, but I am really anal about keeping what hearing I have).

If I were to supress a gun, I would supress a .22 buckmark & use subsonic ammo because it actually would be very quiet.

**I'd like to hear from someone who has a variety of calibers suppressed so that I can find out if my theory about the .45 is BS or not**
 

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If you are looking for the best HK suppressor platform, then you want the HK P9S in 9mm.

The barrel is fixed, so you don't need a recoil booster.


All things being equal, the smaller the bore, the easier to suppress...


If you stick with subsonic ammo, the 9mm will be the quietest of the bunch.
 

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.45 ACP ammo is naturally subsonic out of the box so that makes things easier. With other calibers you need special ammo. It is however not "hollywood quiet" and won't impress many people who are expecting it to just go wooosh. You will also need to shoot it wet.

I got the USP CT/Blackside combo as my first suppressor purchase because I wanted something that looked great, was compact and could be carried in my car and bedside easily, and had tremendous stopping power.

My dealer is still waiting for the Blackside to arrive from Gemtech (10 weeks now)but I have had the CT for several months and love it. We're actually expecting the Blackside to arrive this week so I will post some good video ASAP.

My next purchase will be the Beretta 87 .22 pistol MILSECPRO sells on this site along with an undecided silencer.
 

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I would recommend the Tactical in 9mm with a good 9mm suppressor... maybe the SWR Trident or AAC Evolution.

I don't have either, but have been researching suppressors for a while now (waiting on the Form 4 to come back stamped from ATF for my SWR HEMS II for my Mark 23).

From my research (not personal experience here) the 9mm will suppress better than a .45. I guess it all depends what you're looking for. If you want movie / TV quiet, .22 or 9mm maybe even will do it (with sub-sonic ammo).

Not to mention, the 9mm route will be cheaper. Although not too common, the 9mm tactical will run around $800 or so I think. Heck, you could even buy a USP 9mm and then from HK the 9mm tactical barrel if you have a hard time finding the 9mm Tac. Also, a 9mm suppressor will usually be cheaper than a .45.

I am no suppressor expert, but if I weren't going the Mark 23 / HEMS II route.. the 9mm would be my next choice. (Maybe it will be the next one I do!)

Of course there's also the Tactical in .40 or .45 with suppressor options.......
 

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By far the 22lr using the subsonic ammo is the quitest caliber to suppress. Sounds more like an airsoft gun or a bb gun. The draw back on a 22lr suppressed is that you will need to clean the can often. 22lr ammo is very dirty.

You would need to use the 147grain bullet to get the best performance on a 9mm. The 230 grain bullet for the 45acp. Adding 5cc of water into the suppressor would quite them up a little. Don't add too much water in the can. Too much water will end up spitting back in your face, shirt and hands. I was told by Gemtech that suppressors for the 9mm, 45acp, 223, and 308 do not need any cleaning. The more carbon inside the can the quiter the can gets. The Gemtech rep compared it to your cars muffler. And I quote "Do you clean your cars muffler?".

The 147 grain bullet is pricey as much as the 230 grain bullet. However the 230 grain bullets are readily available as opposed to the 9mm 147 grain bullet. The 45 suppressed sounds like a regular 22lr. The 9mm is a little quiter than the 45acp but not by much.

You need to decide which caliber do you enjoy to shoot, how much cleaning do you want to do, which caliber can you afford or which caliber are you wiling to buy to use on your suppressor. With ammo prices on the rise one needs to consider the overall picture.

I personally own a 22lr, 9mm, 45acp, and 223 suppressor. My son and I enjoy using the 22lr the most. It's the quietest, the most comfortable caliber to shoot, and not to mention the most economical caliber to shoot.
 

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To me, a suppressed subsonic 9mm is way more quiet than a suppressed .45 (which is naturally subsonic).
 

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To me, a suppressed subsonic 9mm is way more quiet than a suppressed .45 (which is naturally subsonic).
Would a subsonic 9mm round have enough oomph to cycle the slide reliably, especially with a suppressor? And would it be lethal enough for use at two way ranges (though I realize that this is more of a hypothetical concern for civilians)?
 

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I know what the ATF fee to short barrel a rifle is... Is it the same to get permission to have a suppressor?
It's actually a tax stamp, looks a lot like a postage stamp, except it says $200. ;) They just stick it on the approved transfer form like a regular stamp.

It's $200 for an MG, suppressor, short rifle, short shotgun, or Destructive Device. It's $5 for an AOW (any other weapon) which is things like pen guns, cane guns, short shotguns whose receivers have never had a stock installed, pistols with a forward pistol grip but no stock (like an SP-89 with an MP5K forward grip) etc etc etc ad infinitum.

Identical process for all of the above. Here in Arizona, it goes more or less like this:

1. Get the three fingerprint cards and the 2 copies of the form (usually an AFT Form 4) from the dealer. Whether you pay for the item now or later is up to you and him. Most cases, you pay up front.

2. Make an appointment to get interviewed by the county sheriff or similar high-level local LE type. Sometimes your state police have an office that handles these things. First time around, you'll make lots of phone calls explaining things to various people until you get an appointment with the right guy. Your dealer might have some great advice on this front. Mine wasn't helpful. If you have a pal who has done transfers recently, he might be able to save you a lot of hassles by directing you to the right guy.

3. Take the forms and the print cards to your meeting. The forms will need a passport photo stuck onto each of them. Wear business clothes but don't go like you're dressed for a job interview. Be relaxed, and don't go armed in any fashion (no knife even) into the police facility.

4. Talk with the LE official in his office. Be yourself. You'll find that they're usually totally cool with the idea of you getting an MG or suppressor or whatever after you talk with them for a few minutes. Sometimes they might even joke around with you. Most cops are gun guys, but they're wary of everyone at first. Once they understand that you're just jumping through ATF hoops and that you're going to get the going-over by the FBI before you take possession of the thing, they relax a whole lot.

5. Get fingerprinted three times over. Make sure the prints are really nice and clear. Let your new LE friend take you to the front of the line, and impress upon the old guy doing the prints that he needs three nice sets for Mr. Gun Owner here.

6. Show the LE official your CCW. (Don't even bother with the whole Class 3 process unless you've already got a concealed carry permit from your home state: it's your bonafide saying that you're at least not an axe murderer or a complete bonehead around firearms). The LE official then runs a background check on you. He comes back and, if you've played things right, he teases you about those speeding tickets you get three years ago, asks if you work for Osama Bin Laden, laughs again when you say something clever, and then he signs your forms. Be nice, don't just run away. Chat and hang out. If the situation allows, offer to buy him a quick lunch or grab a coffee: now that you have him as a friend, you can get future Form 4s signed much more easily.

7. Take the forms and the print cards and photo copy everything. Then FedEx (not mail), FedEx them to ATF, along with your $200 check for the transfer. Include a nice clear letter explaining everything, confirming the details of the weapon being transferred, and confirming your mailing address. This is crucial, as they will never call, fax or email you with any question - if the slightest thing is wrong with the form or any of the cards, they will just mail it all back to you disapproved, after it sits on their desks for a couple of months.

8. You will wait anywhere from 6 weeks to 9 months. Most people wait about two or three months. Your paperwork will show up one fine day when you've almost forgotten about it.

9. Make 27 bazillion copies of the approved Form 4 (or Form Whatever), put the original in a safe, and have a copy of the Form with the gun at all times, like in your range bag, etc.

10. Go and pick up your nifty new Class 3 item.

Important point: you have just obtained a tax stamp. It is not a license. It is just proof that you paid tax on the gun. When you want to get another Class 3 item in the future (and believe me, you will want to), you have to begin the entire process all over again, right from step 1.
 

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My P9S in 45 is a sweet suppressed gun. The action in these makes them VERY nice for suppressors!

If ya want a 22 go with the Walther P22 or the Sig Mosquito..already set up and good to go...easy and cheap
 

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Get an LID equipped 9mm from SWR (Trident), AAC (Evo) or CCF (Impuls IIa w/o carbon fiber).

147 gr 9mm is available per 50 cheaper than 45 acp per 50

It's about gas volume and baffle type. Lower pressure doesn't equal quieter if the baffles are designed to work efficiently with higher pressures.

If your goal is quiet - bolt action 22 LR with an SWR Warlock, AAC Pilot or Aviator.

If you want to stay in centerfire realm - 9mm

Get a host that comes with a threaded barrel or you may face delay in usage until Jarvis or Bar-Sto tool up for your pitch and host.

Do some research on the quantity cans that are always hearing safe dry 45 v 9mm cans.

No 45 can on the market is always hearing safe dry.
 

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I couldn't have said it any better, el Gato!

You haven't heard quiet unless you've heard a .22 bolt action with subsonic ammo out of a 16" barrel with a SWR Warlock.

I have a SWR QD3K that I use on a P9S, MP5 and M11/9/Lage, and it is closer to the .22 than the .45.

I had a SWR HEMS-2, arguably the best .45 suppressor, and that thing was loud even when wet. That experience, plus the cost of ammo has caused me to decide to eliminate the .45 from my stable. Now it's just .22, 9mm, .223 and .308
 
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