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I have a kid in the house, but also would like to keep my P2K by my bed in a secure manner, yet in an easily accessible way.

These Biovaults seem like the trick.

Are they pretty solid, well built & durable?

When the doors are activated, do they "spring" open, like a trap door, allowing, quick & easy instant access, or do you need to then manually open the doors yourself?
 

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the shop here has one and he showed it to me, the doors spring open like a trap door. it was pretty heavy, i'd say it'd fairly hard to force open but it wasnt very large. it could be carried off and opened later if stolen, but seems to be a good idea if you have little ones running around.
 

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I am pretty active and work with my hands a lot and was worried if the lock would work reiably. I could teach it a nice clean fingerprint but would it recognize me when my fingerprint is heavily scuffed & scratched from working in the garden or picking up bricks? Will a cut or scratch on your finger cause it to deny entry? I'd hate to be locked out at a bad time because I got a cut across one of the data points it needs to verify my fingerprint.

I ended up getting a gun vault that has four buttons on the top to enter a code. There are nice impressions to register your fingers in the dark so it is pretty hard to screw up. It beeps loudly when the buttons are pressed so you can tell if a child is playing with it. It also has an alarm that goes off if the safe is bumped or moved, and there is a light that comes on inside when the door is opened. I have it bolted to our large steel bed frame to make it very inconvenient to try and steal. It has internal batteries and a port to hook it up to an external power supply so the batteries only need to work when the power is out. It's been working great for almost 3 years.
 

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I am pretty active and work with my hands a lot and was worried if the lock would work reiably. I could teach it a nice clean fingerprint but would it recognize me when my fingerprint is heavily scuffed & scratched from working in the garden or picking up bricks? Will a cut or scratch on your finger cause it to deny entry? I'd hate to be locked out at a bad time because I got a cut across one of the data points it needs to verify my fingerprint.

you got ten fingers, and it programs up to 50 fingerprints in its memory.


just program diff finger and your set.
 

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i would think that scenario was covered in the R & D, it might just use 3 of the fingerprints or something along that line. when i saw the one at the shop the owner could open it but 2 of put our hands down and it stayed locked. it seemed pretty high-tech.
 

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It has internal batteries and a port to hook it up to an external power supply so the batteries only need to work when the power is out. It's been working great for almost 3 years.
Ah this is not true. Read the manual from their web site

+If you're on AC, then you screwed if the power goes out.

+If you're on batteries, then you're okay... assuming the batteries are still good.

+You cannot use batteries and the A/C power source at the same time. The AC adapter doesn't charge the batteries.

IMO, I would never use a device that relies upon power to open.
 

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Ah this is not true. Read the manual from their web site

+If you're on AC, then you screwed if the power goes out.

+If you're on batteries, then you're okay... assuming the batteries are still good.

+You cannot use batteries and the A/C power source at the same time. The AC adapter doesn't charge the batteries.

IMO, I would never use a device that relies upon power to open.
They all have a key that opens them as well..
 

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if i had one that had a key also, the key would be hidden which if the power goes out i'm now looking for a small key in the dark. i do keep my inova lights on the nightstand but who really wants to be looking for the key.
 

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Get a P7-M8

You can remove the firing pin assembly in seconds without tools. You can put it back in within seconds also.

Between the squeeze cocker being hard for kids to squeeze, and the firing pin assembly being complex (unlkess you know how to do it), I was always confident about leaving my M8 on the nightstand.

I would have the firing pin assembly in the bowl where I threw my change, and the M8 on my bed stand with a loaded mag, empty chamber.

In case of emergency, all I had to do was insert the firing pin assembly and rack the slide... Not much more effort that opening a safe, even if it's just a fingerprint.... and no worries about the safe failing me.
 

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I have the one with the 4 buttons on top - hooked up to AC and batteries. I would never buy it again. I had the one with only batteries first and it ran out after only 6 months- they exchanged it for "deluxe" so I could plug it in. I would rather have one that doesn't rely on AC or batteries- I just don't really trust it. plus the buttons are rather hard to push.
 

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i didnt know that about the p7, thats pretty interesting. I have nothing but automatics and i keep the chamber empty, all i have to do is rack the slide. my son isnt strong enough to do that...........yet!
 

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I do NOT have a Biovault, but I do have a commercial fingerprint reader that is about one year old. It was the state of the art, and cost about $1200. It is used for authorized access to open a door. Here are my comments about the commercial fingerprint reader.

In the commercial fingerprint reader the user does not have to “swipe” his finger, he just places it on a glass and it is scanned. This is better and more repeatable then “swiping” a finger, because the movement of the finger is another variable.

The commercial fingerprint reader has 2 different modes for scanning. One is full fingerprint recognition (just place your finger on the scanner), and the other is enter an ID and then scan the finger. In the full finger print recognition, without putting in an ID, the scanner checks against all users, with the ID it only checks against the users ID.

In the commercial fingerprint reader there are 3 different levels of verification, we use the simplest. Let me first say that I believe 100% that commercial unit will NOT allow someone unauthorized in. BUT the problem is it will also sometimes not let an authorized user in.

Here are the Pros of a fingerprint reader – 1. It is accessible without a key, as long as you have your finger you should be able to get in. There is nothing to lose, where someone can use it to gain access, such as a key or magnetic card. 2. You can electronically add and delete users with minimal effort. 3. You can identify anyone that entered, and people cannot loan their finger to other people to get in, as they can with a key or magnetic card.

Here are the cons: 1. Some people cannot use it, due to their physical fingerprint. 2. You must present your finger exactly the same way to the scanner each time, or it will not recognize you. 3. If your hands a slightly wet, having just washed your hands, it will have trouble recognizing you (also see quote below from Biovault manual). 4. We have also observed that if someone has been physically exerting themselves, and their heart is really pumping, it has trouble recognizing them. 5. It is electronic, and needs power. No power = no opening. 6. It is electronic and is probably susceptible to an EMP pulse.

I would suggest to actually try the Biovault before you buy it. See how fast you can open it. Wet you finger a little and see if it will open. The technology could be a year newer than what I have, and could have improved.

My thoughts: If I just wanted to secure a firearm to keep unauthorized personnel from accessing it, and I did not need to access it in an emergency, then a fingerprint scanner would be fine.

I would NOT use any type of fingerprint scanner to secure something that I might have to access in a hurry, under duress, or while injured (possible having blood on a finger). Since there is no key for the Biovault, you may not be able to get into it at all while under duress or injured.


BTW – In the Biovault Manual it says the following:

Warning: This unit does not have a backup key, card reader, or PIN access,
it is only accessible by fingerprint.

Q: Will the BioVault 2.0 scan my finger correctly when my finger/fingerprint is puffy
after a shower/swimming?
A: The BioVault 2.0 has been designed to be very sensitive when authenticating
and matching fingerprints. The unit will open when your fingerprint has
increased moisture from after an average shower or swim and will open. There
may be times when extreme water retention due to extended time in the water
will cause a minuet aspect of your fingerprints to change for a short time and
access to your BioVault 2.0 may be denied until your fingerprint returns to its
ordinary normal condition the same as when you originally enrolled that print.
 

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One more thing to add, biometrics is not fool proof either. It's pretty simple to fake a fingerprint (actually mythbusters did a segment on it and the results were surprising on how easy it was).
 

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I've used fingerprint scanners in laptops and other devices for a very SHORT period of time, mainly becuase I've had more problems then they're worth. Best thing you could probably do with your P2000 if you want to make it unfireable by a little child is take the slide off and keep the slide assembly and the firearm together.
 

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One more thing to add, biometrics is not fool proof either. It's pretty simple to fake a fingerprint (actually mythbusters did a segment on it and the results were surprising on how easy it was).
Guys!

Keep your kids away from the show mythbusters or you will be in trouble if they come asking for a photocopy of your fingerprints!



someone else brought this up as well.

I wouldnt consider it a fail safe security but it is better than most and has a key that is normally always attached to you.
 

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You are supposed to firmly affix any safe under a certain size to some other structure (floor, wall, large furniture etc.). This way no one can make off with the whole safe and open it later as someone previously described.

The fingerprint readers are interesting as it always lets you always have the "key" with you. I never liked electronic safes though and while a fingerprint would be fastest I still prefer the normal keys for in the safe storage. For quick access I prefer a loaded gun with empty chamber in a locked draw. I personally have no kids in my house so this works for me.
 

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I have one from this company:

http://www.biosaf.com/

Mine is about four years old. It is a steel lined, walnut exterior version. It looks good sitting on my nightstand - like part of the bedroom furniture set. It was not cheap - at around $350 but well worth it IMHO. It has AC power, with battery backup and low batt warnings. (4AA last about a year).

It holds 1000 fingerprints - I have read every finger on both hands multiple times for extra speedy readings and security. I trust the technology and feel safe leaving my two 'go to' pistols and a surefire flashlight in the safe. I have two young boys and wanted the solid and secure way to store my weapons - no keys to be lost (or found by the wrong people), no codes to forget, or crack, etc. Just my fingerprint. I like it - in four years... no hiccups.
 
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