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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Being new to long guns in general I've been trying to get a feel of what this exactly means. I usually shoot handguns and I'm interested in trying to get some clarification on Bull vs Tapered barrels. In particular w/ regards to the HK91 and it's PTR doppelganger, as I'm interested in buying one of those eventually.

From the research I've done there's a lot of "unsaid" portions I'm hoping I can get cleared up that I'm just going to assume is something everybody else knows and I'm just not in the cool kids club yet.

I understand the bull barrel is supposed to be more accurate, however the reasons often cited are because the weight makes it more stable, barrel harmonics, and slower to heat up. What this leads me to believe is the barrel itself actually isn't inherently more accurate than a tapered one, it just makes it easier for the shooter to perform. That's not to say I'm denying that the human element affects accuracy, but if you were to clamp them down side by side you wouldn't notice a difference? Assuming you've tailored an appropriate round for each barrel due to different harmonics.

On a second note, exactly how fast/how much heat would one have to see to notice a difference between a bull and a tapered barrel? Is this something you would see just plinking at a range in semi or is it really more of a concern for when you're dropping rounds in quick succession? This point has been somewhat vague to me. I understand heat makes the pattern widen up, due to the properties of the barrel material. It's never been made clear to me exactly how fast this occurs and whether or not it's something someone would notice normally.

Now a lot of the statements of accuracy I've read in general w/ regards to the HK91/PTR platform quote accuracy in the 2-3MOA range for a regular barrel and usually the "accurized" ones are 1-1.5 MOA. In these "accurized" cases are we really just seeing the improved performance of the shooter based on easier to operate/precise equipment and not necessarily the improvement of the gun itself. While yes technically trigger work is an upgrade to the gun, it doesn't help the gun do it's job. It helps you use the gun, if that makes any sense.

I guess I'm a complete novice on what other factors I may be overlooking but what it boils down to is if you were to remove the human element then really both guns would shoot the same?

Appreciate any input, I've been reading what I can in regards to this stuff and at this point I'd feel it's probably a good idea to get my facts checked and clarified.
 
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