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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I wanted to ask you all if you think dry firing an HK pistol with snap caps 1,000 times would work to smooth out a new trigger?

It would sure save ammunition funds and get your muscle memory used to the trigger quickly..

Thoughts? Any serious downsides?

Thanks and best to all.
 

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IMO
1. Dry fire vs live fire are two entirely different animals just as 1911/vs polymer advanced HK browning designs are.
2. Keeping the slide open will help the new RSA lighten up.
3. Dry firing will not wear in your trigger as well as an actual 1k rounds downrange. Dry fire does not have any force racking the slide back per shot. Energy makes a difference.
4. 1k rounds downrange is far more fun that 1000 dry fires any day.
5. Get out and shoot it a bunch and I bet you no longer feel what you feel in dry fire at all. The HK was made for serious live use and not dry fire feel.
6. Dry fire is great for learning proper trigger control, provided you dry fire properly. It can also help you practice point and shoot. Other than that... just enjoyment.

In summary, everyone should stop worrying about how an HK triggers feels in dry fire. 99.9% of dry fire feelings are gone under live fire actual use. If you were to have a trigger system that was smooth as silk in a HK, it could be a very dangerous arm. OCD gets in the way when handling defensive arms meant for serious use. The more you fire that HK the happier you will be, all around. If not, I have $100 ready to take it off your hands :biggrin:

Enjoy it, shoot it straight and stay safe*
 

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Dry firing will definitely help to smooth out the triggers. I still shoot at targets on the TV using both hands and It's also how I forced myself to shoot with both eyes open.

I don't bother with snap caps.
 

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I dryfire the chit out of new pistols, especially when "learning" a new trigger or swapping between platforms. It's how I learned to "love the LEM".

Get yourself a Laserlyte cartridge (or similar) and get some practice out of it. I use my Pact Club timer set on a par time to reduce my 1st shot times and smooth my draw stroke, it really, really helped me push "into" a target vs just a full presentation. Also works great for practicing with handheld lights. I've got a range out back, shoot a couple times a week, and I still spend quite a bit of time dryfiring on my downstairs "range":





You don't need the "target" unless you want to see groups, the beam emits long enough to see it on household objects, like lampshades, pictures, cats, etc.

Another benefit, once the laserlyte cartridge is in there, it has to be removed with a rod, so there's no chance of a live round entering the chamber during dryfire practice.

Chuck
 

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Dry fire is a key component of an advanced shooter's development, provided that you want to go beyond mediocrity seen on public ranges and in many training classes. Absolutely every top technical shooter in this country dry fires several times fold over their live fire volume. Even the great Rob Leatham, who won and achieved everything, still dry fires.
Point of it is this. Trigger will definitely get better, especially on a striker gun. Guns on the shelves of gun stores (picked, fondled and dry fired by customers) have better triggers comparing to out of box guns. However, it would be waste to use that time as a primary gun smoothing procedure, as opposed to skill development process. Dry fire is not simple click click thingy. There's a lot of thought process behind drills and schedules put in by people who proved their bona fides by winning. Invest a little money and buy a good dry fire book. Always use snap caps.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I dryfire the chit out of new pistols, especially when "learning" a new trigger or swapping between platforms. It's how I learned to "love the LEM"
I also learned to "Stop Worrying and Love the Striker" with a Glock 30SF.


It made me much more accurate and faster in presentation by walking around, and picking instant, random targets around the house...

But I originally smoothed out a CZ75 years ago by dry-firing and cycling the slide between trigger pulls. It definitely helped.

What I'm after in this post is if anyone has smoothed their trigger out in an HK by doing this?
 

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My guns are smoother after about a thousand rounds, but only really noticeable if you're shooting slowly. I don't use snap caps, because I don't like having aluminum shavings all inside my gun, and the rims seem to get torn up pretty quickly. I have dummy rounds that I use for drills, but they don't have anything in the primer pocket. Maybe I'm asking for it, but I guess I'll see.
 

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I don't like to dry fire over and over, once or twice on a new gun just to check it and get a fast feel of it. But as far as smoothing out a trigger. if you have to use it it wouldn't matter if it felt like it was full of sand and had a 20lb trigger pull. Adrenaline takes over and you won't even notice it.
 

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"They" say most modern pistols don't need snap caps but I bought them for my vp9 and a set for my p30l in 40.
I have 3 with different triggers vp9 sa, p30sk da/sa, p30l lem. I also use snap caps to simulate bad rounds at the range... Cuz I know its not my hk that's bad.

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Adrenaline takes over and you won't even notice it.
This is one of my pet peeves. Besides allowing to not notice the trigger weight, adrenaline will diminish your ability to manipulate trigger correctly which explains why people's accuracy performance degrades under stress.
In addition, better trigger will still be easier to manipulate correctly whether you notice the pull weight or not. That explains why shooting the same courses of fire under condition of a mild-to-moderate stress (classes, competition) is easier with better trigger.
"Adrenaline and won't notice argument" is completely off the mark in regards to performing specific shooting tasks under stressful conditions. You may not notice the trigger weight but you don't magically become capable of shooting 6.5 lbs crunchy striker as if it is a tuned 1911.
 

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What I'm after in this post is if anyone has smoothed their trigger out in an HK by doing this?
Yes, to some extent, but it's not going to accomplish the same thing a professional trigger job (or in some cases replacing springs) will do. It just makes sense as things wear in, and smooth out. To be honest, I don' know where the point of "it's smoothing out" to "I've gotten used to it" starts and stops......I've also been amazed at what a little judicial lubrication in the right places will accomplish. I've got a P2000 LEM that feels like there's sand in there somewhere till I put in a little dab of oil around the trigger bar, then it smooths right out and is actually quite good.

Chuck
 

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Dry fire will help things wear in a bit , but. .....

SNAP CAPS , you don't need no stinkin' SNAP CAPS !



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