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Hi gang,

I was looking for food for my HK91 when I came across these guys:

http://www.advancedtactical.com

They sell new and remanufactured ammo. 150g FMJ millspec brass for $400 per 1000 rounds (new) and the same for $260 bucks per 1000 rounds (remanufactured).

I'm rather leery of using reman'd ammo in any of my rifles, but $260 bucks per 1000 ain't bad.

Anyone have any experience with these guys? I don't want to blow up my new pet rifle for the sake of saving a few bucks on ammo. BTW, I reload my own brass, so I got ammo to practice with. Just looking for a good source of ammo for my 91, since all of the surplus South African stuff is gone.

SSG
 

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Hi gang,

I was looking for food for my HK91 when I came across these guys:

http://www.advancedtactical.com

They sell new and remanufactured ammo. 150g FMJ millspec brass for $400 per 1000 rounds (new) and the same for $260 bucks per 1000 rounds (remanufactured).

I'm rather leery of using reman'd ammo in any of my rifles, but $260 bucks per 1000 ain't bad.

Anyone have any experience with these guys? I don't want to blow up my new pet rifle for the sake of saving a few bucks on ammo. BTW, I reload my own brass, so I got ammo to practice with. Just looking for a good source of ammo for my 91, since all of the surplus South African stuff is gone.

SSG
Have you reloaded anything from your 91? I've never reloaded necked-down rifle brass, only shotgun and pistol cartridges. How on earth do you reload anything that's been ejected from a 91? It is so beat to hell. Even with the port buffer, the primer seat gets damaged.
 

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Have you reloaded anything from your 91? I've never reloaded necked-down rifle brass, only shotgun and pistol cartridges. How on earth do you reload anything that's been ejected from a 91? It is so beat to hell. Even with the port buffer, the primer seat gets damaged.
Well, in all fairness, I reload for the .308, but have not actually had a chance to reload any brass from a 91 yet. I have reloaded brass from my 93, and other than the faint lines on the casing, it's not too beat up to reload. And this is without a port buffer. Fully resizing the case irons out small dings and whatnot and gets rid of most of the lines, as well as straightening out the case mouth and making it perfectly round.

If the brass is too bent or beat up, I won't reload it. I've been using HK's since my military days (mid 80's to 2000), but am a newbie when it comes to owning the HK91... is the brass really that beat up after firing? I just bought my first HK91 recently and have yet to fire it... .sorry about the confusion. I didn't mean to make it sound like I reload for the 91 all the time. 99.9% of the brass I have reloaded in .308/7.62 has come out of my SSG69 and is perfect.

So about Advancedtactical.com... you have any experience with it or no?

SSG
 

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Have you reloaded anything from your 91? I've never reloaded necked-down rifle brass, only shotgun and pistol cartridges. How on earth do you reload anything that's been ejected from a 91? It is so beat to hell. Even with the port buffer, the primer seat gets damaged.
I have reloaded brass from my PTR91 fired with Port Buffer in place. Once you get it clean in the tumbler, I have not noticed any problems with it. The '93 brass is a different animal altogether due to the primer pocket sized nipple on the bolt face sort of mangling the primer pocket, but with a swage you are ok.

YMMV
 

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This is what my SR9T does to the casings - in addition to the two dents, and the nick in the rim, it also puts a dent in the face from the extractor. Can this stuff be reloaded? How can the resizer get down past the neck to push out those dents? Like I said, I've never reloaded cases with a reduced neck, and haven't even really looked at the dies for them.

 

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If you will give it a chance, I think you will find that some of the cases which look like that will be useful. Maybe not all of them.

The port buffer is a must have item if you think you will be reloading. Brass fired over a buffer is indistinguishable from other brass, other than the burn marks, which come right off in the tumbler.
 

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hey guys

i reload for my PTR and it is no problem , never had a problem with the primer pockets , the dents in the side , well no problem there either , and if the case mouth is dinged, i use a small pair of needle nose pliers and bend it back out, no problems so far.
 

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hey guys

i reload for my PTR and it is no problem , never had a problem with the primer pockets , the dents in the side , well no problem there either , and if the case mouth is dinged, i use a small pair of needle nose pliers and bend it back out, no problems so far.

Yikes!
 

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hey guys

i reload for my PTR and it is no problem , never had a problem with the primer pockets , the dents in the side , well no problem there either , and if the case mouth is dinged, i use a small pair of needle nose pliers and bend it back out, no problems so far.
The case mouth I wouldn't worry about much, the resizing die fixes that one, right?

My fear was that the dents in the side could rupture when they pop back out. Like I said, I've never observed reloading of necked cases. The resizing die only assures that the outside of the case fits inside the chamber, it does nothing to straighten the dents from the inside, correct?
 

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The case mouth I wouldn't worry about much, the resizing die fixes that one, right?

My fear was that the dents in the side could rupture when they pop back out. Like I said, I've never observed reloading of necked cases. The resizing die only assures that the outside of the case fits inside the chamber, it does nothing to straighten the dents from the inside, correct?
Well, in my experience there is still visible evidence of the dents that were once there after you FL size, but unless what you have is a cut, as opposed to a dent, in the brass, the integrity of the material is not compromised. The brass is very malleable. Upon firing, the dents will form to the inside of your chamber as would any other part of the brass. You will not have a rupture unless the brass is very weak, such as with excessive use of the same case. Cases get brittle over time, and if it were excessively brittle, it might break.

(As an aside, I tend to think that the cases shot in these rifles *may* have a beneficial side effect due to the way hotter that they are compared to cases fired in another rifle. I sort of think that the gases flowing around the outside of the cases due to the fluting in the chambers tends to keep them a little softer, sort of like annealing. They may actually last longer than those fired in a bolt gun and full length resized. This is just a SWAG though. I have noticed that resizing the PTR91 brass requires less effort than brass fired in my bolt rifle, but that could be due to chamber dimension differences as well.)

When you run the brass up into the full length sizing die, the outer circumference of the brass is forced to be round again, or very nearly round, by the action of the FL die. If it will then chamber, it will fire safely. There are some dents to watch closely for, such as those on the shoulder which *might* impede chambering. Not all of your cases will be reuseable as might be expected from a bolt actioned rifle, but most will be. You have to examine them after sizing to see how they look. I lose about 5% to range gods, since the rifle throws the brass pretty far, and another 5% to excessive denting, or other damage. The other 90% are useable once they are cleaned and sized.

But as with any reloading outfit, it is incumbent upon the operator to examine his product and to determine safety. Case neck splits, or excessive hardness can render a particular cartridge unsafe. Same here. If the dents look more like cuts in your brass, it would be a good idea to discard that one. Some will just be dents. Those are ok to use.*(footnote)

If you have any doubts whatsoever about the safety of these practices, it is up to you to not do it. I am only telling you what I have done successfully, your experience may vary greatly, and I am not warranting in any manner my practices. You are free to reject them like you would a counterfeit twenty dollar bill.

Someone indicated that the case head gets a nick or cut in it from the ejector, and that is probably correct. This is another indicator of loads which the rifle is unhappy with. If the denting here is comparatively bad, you know you may have loaded a round the rifle doesn't like. I have an old diamond fingernail file my ex wife left behind which works wonders on those little case head/extractor rim nicks.

(footnote) Accuracy doesn't seem to be adversely affected in my rifle with dented cases either. I have read elsewhere that it is affected.
 

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AviatorDave , so far i know i have about 50 peices that i have reloaded , that came from my PTR , and so far no ruptures, but i do eyeball them very well, and if in doubt, i use a straight paperclip and run it down inside and feel for something that shouldnt be there. but so far no problems, the only problem i have is finding all the brass......lol:44:
 

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reload

PTR-91,
reloaded a couple hundred so far. Mine doesn't typically mash them as bad as what Aviator Dave showed, but some are worse than others, (no buffer). You can still see some evidence of these but not half as bad as some 'new' surplus, some show no signs whatsoever. Seems to really egg the case, make sure you use full length small base dies, sometimes small base are tough to find. Guess the difference is they are a bit tighter tolerance, or just smaller than standard. Most manufacturers recommend for any semi-auto, pump, etc small base dies. There is nothing to push the dents out, but still seem pretty good by eliminating egg shape. As with any reloading, you are responsible for your own butt, make sure you bide your p's and q's, if there is a question about a case, pitch it.
 

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Are you guys using a claw scope mount? Someone earlier (one of the other regulars, can't remember whom) thought the second dent might be from the scope mount, which seems reasonable.

It is only my SR9T that tears it up this much, my other 91 didn't seem to. (It's been at Urbach's place since April so I can't check it to compare.) I have two other 91s in vastly different conditions, I'll see what they do next time I shoot them.
 

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Are you guys using a claw scope mount? Someone earlier (one of the other regulars, can't remember whom) thought the second dent might be from the scope mount, which seems reasonable.

It is only my SR9T that tears it up this much, my other 91 didn't seem to. (It's been at Urbach's place since April so I can't check it to compare.) I have two other 91s in vastly different conditions, I'll see what they do next time I shoot them.
Yep. The scope mount will ding them up. Even on my V93, there is no damage to the case upon ejection unless the scope mount is in place, in which instance there is a huge crease in the case.

With the port buffer on the PTR91, however, there is no denting whatsoever, even with the claw mount in place.
 

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If you use the port buffer, brass finding is very easy. It will still fling it, just not as far or as hard. Prior to installing the buffer I was video taping off a tripod and thought I had the camera far enough out to be missed. Wanted an idea of where all the brass was going, due to long grass hiding some of it. On the video you see the camera rock slightly and hear the sound of a piece of brass hitting one of the tripod legs. It was probably 30 feet or so to the ejection port from the tripod.
People around me at the range always end up moving - even though the brass is thrown forward, they have posts that support the roof over the shooting area, and the shells keep bouncing off the posts onto other shooters.

They finally put up screens between the different lanes to stop flying brass. So now they rain back on me.
 

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range story

While at the range a guy told me about a fellow shooter w/ an unknown semi auto. A case hit the tin roof overhead and came back down and landed stuck between his glasses and eyeball. LOL burned eyelid pretty good, yikes.

while I was at the range w/ ~24 shooters, I was third from left, casings landed in front of and to the right of farthest shooter, about 35 feet.
 
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