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Discussion Starter #1
I have a question that I cannot find addressed in the forum archives but it may have been asked. I have a Cheaper Than Dirt G3 stock and am in the process of converting it to a C93. Could you remove the guide rod, shorten it, then weld it to the plate and use the C93 spring? Seems to me that if the angle is the same it should work but I can't find where anyone has done it. I have been in the steel fabrication industry for 30 years and my company is very generous with their equipment. Also, if I wanted to fabricate a "buffer plate" does anyone know the type of steel one should use (A36, 572 or harder)? I'm wondering if the G3 buffer were removed would there be an advantage to welding up the plunger hole and the hole above it as opposed to fabricating a solid buffer plate. It seems that buffer plates are scarce. The C93 I'm working on has a buffered carrier. Many thanks.
 

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At $43 for a 93 backplate, I cant see the advantage of making your own from the G3. Obviously by your profession, you would have fun doing it, but you could just sell the complete G3 backplate and apply those funds to a new 93 backplate.

Your C93, since it has a buffered carrier should only have a thin strip of plastic in the all plastic A2 stock where the bolt carrier makes contact. That being said and in regards to the G3 backplate, as long as the buffer on the carrier is making contact with the metal on the backplate with the buffer removed, you should be fine. This would be similar in concept to the older non-buffered A3 stocks for the 93.

Steel Back Plate for HK93 HK33 HK53 C93 V53 V33 V93, RTG Gun Parts



Best,

TC
 

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Why bother taking out the G3 buffer? The gun will run fine with both installed.
 

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If you have the buffered bolt hack away.

I made mine in 1988

 

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Why bother taking out the G3 buffer? The gun will run fine with both installed.
This. I took a G3 back plate and modified it to fit a 93/33 type rifle receiver. Pretty much free handed the shaping ( a man and his Dremel tool can be mighty dangerous) to get the one hole pin fit. I removed the fixed recoil rod from this back plate and added a very short machine screw through the resulting hole. A nut was then lock-tited and tightened into place. This screw/nut face serves as the pad for the floating 93/33 recoil/spring rod. As has been mention here already, just leave the G3 buffer in place. Then with your buffered 33 bolt carrier you get double buffered.



 

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At $43 for a 93 backplate, I cant see the advantage of making your own from the G3. Obviously by your profession, you would have fun doing it, but you could just sell the complete G3 backplate and apply those funds to a new 93 backplate.

Your C93, since it has a buffered carrier should only have a thin strip of plastic in the all plastic A2 stock where the bolt carrier makes contact. That being said and in regards to the G3 backplate, as long as the buffer on the carrier is making contact with the metal on the backplate with the buffer removed, you should be fine. This would be similar in concept to the older non-buffered A3 stocks for the 93.

Steel Back Plate for HK93 HK33 HK53 C93 V53 V33 V93, RTG Gun Parts



Best,

TC

Are those RTG parts all factory HK parts? They don't say in the ad who makes the stock assembly components?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the info. After further review would this work (wondering why no one has tried it so it makes me worry there is a reason it doesn't work): The recoil rod on the G3 is 12 1/4" long; the recoil rod on the C93 is 11" long. If the recoil rod (which is a hollow piece of tubing) on the G3 stock was cut down to 11" with a tubing cutter, then the two holes for the stop pin were redrilled, could you then put in a C93 recoil spring, add the stop pin, and rivet the new holes? You would have a scaled down version of the G3 stock without having to disassemble or weld anything. Also, you would not lose the orientation of the recoil rod because it would never be removed. I don't think I'll have any problem cutting off the first pin hole of the back plate and you folks are telling me the double buffer issue is a non-issue. What do you guys think???
 

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What do you guys think???
What I think is instead of modifying parts, why not order up original parts that do what you want? They are neither expensive or hard to find.
 

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If you insist on making this a lot of work and much harder than need be go for it. Most HK owners would prefer to get rid of the fixed recoil rod and spring for the kind stays in the bolt like the 93 spring. Why don't you do it your way and then tell us how it works because i don't know anyone who would make it so hard or complicated a job when the proven parts and advice have been tendered to your post already. Post your results for sure.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the replies. I do want you gentlemen to think about something however. I do not in any way want to come off as being superior but remember my career profession. What I'm considering doing would be very difficult for a guy with a hand drill and hacksaw in the garage but I assess it as a 45 minute to one hour job; doing some precise measuring then making a cut and drilling two 2.5 mm holes. Do it every day on stuff more complicated than a recoil rod. Something I can do the next time I have a little downtime waiting on a blueprint. Honestly-got the fabrication part covered. Will let you know the results. I am worried about the mechanical aspect. You have already roused my curiosity as to why a "floating" recoil rod would be prefered over a fixed one-that's the kind of stuff I would like comments on. Many thanks; I value your input.
 

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If you insist on making this a lot of work and much harder than need be go for it. Most HK owners would prefer to get rid of the fixed recoil rod and spring for the kind stays in the bolt like the 93 spring. Why don't you do it your way and then tell us how it works because i don't know anyone who would make it so hard or complicated a job when the proven parts and advice have been tendered to your post already. Post your results for sure.

Good luck.
This.
Whatever floats your boat, dude. Post pics.
 
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