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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a little daylight left when I got home last night so I headed out to my front yard range with my 45c. On my third shot nothing happened, this was a weird moment as this had never happened before. I pulled the slide back and recovered the unfired bullet and finished the rest of the loads with no problem. I gathered up the casings and headed in the house. I should add these are winchester white box ammo you get at wal-mart. Anyway, I am not used to paying attention to the spot on the casing where the pin hits so I am not sure what I am looking at. The bullet that did not fire had a perfect little round mark on it. The ones that fired had the same mark but also a small slash off to the side. This got me to thinking the gun was at fault. Any thoughts are appreciated.
 

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If the primer was dented the same then it was most likely your ammo. The "slash" to the side that you see where the firing pin hits is caused by the firing pin still protruding through the f.pin hole in the breech face as the empty casing is extracted and turns to be ejected. That is normal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is what I wanted to hear. Now that I know this can happen, I can log it in my memory to clear it and move on. It did stall me out for a minute. Is this the results of cheaper ammo? P.S. I also just removed this round from my pocket. :eek:
 

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It can happen to any type of ammo. It is just like anything else a bad component gets by evey now and then. What I would recommend to you since that rattled you so much is this. Take some snap caps with you on trips to the range. Put one or two in the mags as you are shooting Load up several mags so that you don't know where they are in the mags and then shoot. This way if that happens again you just go through the failure drills and don't think anything about it. You def. don't want to be wondering WTF if that happens in a case where you actually have to use it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It can happen to any type of ammo. It is just like anything else a bad component gets by evey now and then. What I would recommend to you since that rattled you so much is this. Take some snap caps with you on trips to the range. Put one or two in the mags as you are shooting Load up several mags so that you don't know where they are in the mags and then shoot. This way if that happens again you just go through the failure drills and don't think anything about it. You def. don't want to be wondering WTF if that happens in a case where you actually have to use it.
I will do that, One of my new years resoultions is to practice more. Thank You!
 

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If the primer was dented the same then it was most likely your ammo. The "slash" to the side that you see where the firing pin hits is caused by the firing pin still protruding through the f.pin hole in the breech face as the empty casing is extracted and turns to be ejected. That is normal.
Exactly! :)
 

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It certainly could be either the ammo or the pistol, but I agree that it is most likely the ammo. If the depth of the firing-pin impression on the dud appears to be the same as on the spent casings, then it is almost certain to be the ammo as opposed to being a light strike.
 

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If you still have the round, you could re-insert it into the chamber and pull the trigger a few more times (pointed in a safe direction) and see if it was a "light strike". If it still will not fire, I'd pull the bullet and see if it had powder. If it does, it must have been a bad primer. (I had one once w/ 9mm Winchester. )
 

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What is a proper way to dispose of the bad ammo?
 

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It can happen to any type of ammo. It is just like anything else a bad component gets by evey now and then. What I would recommend to you since that rattled you so much is this. Take some snap caps with you on trips to the range. Put one or two in the mags as you are shooting Load up several mags so that you don't know where they are in the mags and then shoot. This way if that happens again you just go through the failure drills and don't think anything about it. You def. don't want to be wondering WTF if that happens in a case where you actually have to use it.
+1. You beat me to it. Clear the failure and keep on gunning. After you are finished then find the unfired round to find out WTF. It would really suck if that happened in a real gunfight and you took the time to recover the dud round while the bad guy is still shooting.
 
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I heard somewhere that moisture can cause delayed ignition of the powder, and for that reason, if you have a round fail to fire, you should give it a little bit of time before ejecting the round. I'm talking about at the range or whatever... obviously you don't want to wait a few seconds to eject the round in a SD situation. Anyone know if there's any truth to this? I've had rounds fail to fire (many times in my .22, and once in my .45). I always just ejected it right away and kept firing, but according to what i've heard, that isn't safe to do.
 

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I heard somewhere that moisture can cause delayed ignition of the powder, and for that reason, if you have a round fail to fire, you should give it a little bit of time before ejecting the round. I'm talking about at the range or whatever... obviously you don't want to wait a few seconds to eject the round in a SD situation. Anyone know if there's any truth to this? I've had rounds fail to fire (many times in my .22, and once in my .45). I always just ejected it right away and kept firing, but according to what i've heard, that isn't safe to do.
You are right. In a non-combat situation it's adviseable to point the gun down-range for 30 seconds and wait.

A friend of mine had a failure to fire and the round DID go bang about 20 seconds later .. definitely not funny if it happens to you.

-Valynor
 

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I would still just do immediate action and forget about it. If the primer does ignite 30 seconds later it will do so harmlessly on the ground. You can not say you would do something on a range, but if it was real life you would do something else. If you get into the habit of pointing the weapon downrange for 30 seconds while training, I'll bet my left nut you'll do it when the SHTF.

Just my $.02
 
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You can not say you would do something on a range, but if it was real life you would do something else
Point taken. I think it's still important to realize that that primer might ignite, in case there is anyone else around near where that round may have fallen. I realize it's not good to have different routines at the range and in real life, but if I were using my handgun in a SD situation, I don't think I'd hesitate extracting a round that didn't fire. Something tells me instinct would kick in. Of course, it's probably not good to leave something like that up to speculation. But at any rate, good to practice that sort of situation with dummy ammunition.
 

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I would still just do immediate action and forget about it. If the primer does ignite 30 seconds later it will do so harmlessly on the ground. You can not say you would do something on a range, but if it was real life you would do something else. If you get into the habit of pointing the weapon downrange for 30 seconds while training, I'll bet my left nut you'll do it when the SHTF.

Just my $.02
I agree with your premise, however, there are lots of other things that I don't do at the range that I would do different if the stakes were higher. Actually, they are things I can't do at the range - like shorter than 1 second between shots, firing from a draw, combat mag changes, the list goes on and on.

And all the ranges nearby have similar rules. Waiting x seconds after a misfire before ejecting the round is even one of the written rules on the paper you have to sign before you shoot there at some of the ranges.
 

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Point taken. I think it's still important to realize that that primer might ignite, in case there is anyone else around near where that round may have fallen. I realize it's not good to have different routines at the range and in real life, but if I were using my handgun in a SD situation, I don't think I'd hesitate extracting a round that didn't fire. Something tells me instinct would kick in. Of course, it's probably not good to leave something like that up to speculation. But at any rate, good to practice that sort of situation with dummy ammunition.
Your instict will be fight or flight. If you do stay and fight your actions will be decided by your training and what you have stored in muscle memory. I feel very strongly about this subject because I have seen it several times, and realized after the fact I have done things myself a few times.

As for the range you shoot at not letting you do certain things, get a new range because they are making you develop bad habits.

OK, I'm off my soap box, have fun and stay safe.
 
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