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Hello Everyone,

I'm new here (first post) and I have a question regarding my first handgun. I recently received my handgun permit and decided I wanted to buy the HK P30. The main use of the gun will be for home security and firing at the range. I see there are many variations of this gun and I have absolutely no idea what they mean. I'd like to know which variation will suit me best based on the uses I mentioned above. Thanks in advance for your help.

Nick
 

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Nobody can answer this question. Before buying, try to shoot both the V2 and V3. If you don't have a range that rents near by, post your location and perhaps a forum member can help you out.
 

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Yup, they're right

Definitly shoot the v2 and v3... I personally found v3 is what I prefer to IWC and V2 is what I prefer at the rand and home defense.

You may be polar opposite so try both...I could have saved a lot of $$ by following the advise these guys gave you.
 

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I have a P30 V3 and I think it's a great pistol. It has a conventional double action/single action trigger. Some shooters don't like this kind of trigger,but I don't have any issues with it. The other two types of triggers are the D. A. O. Double Action Only, LEM Law Enforcement Modification Trigger. The LEM is a hybrid trigger that can work like a DAO trigger when you want to but with proper trigger control it also work like a single action trigger. Currently you will find the following variants in the USA.
1) V2 LEM with 7.5 pond trigger
2) V3 DA/SA with a decocker button located on the rear of the slide. My P30 has a 10.5 pond DA trigger pull and a 5.5 pond trigger pull in SA.
4) V3S has a manual safety.

I hope this helps, Double O.
 

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Strange thing is that my v3 was closer to 8 lbs in SA

I have a P30 V3 and I think it's a great pistol. It has a conventional double action/single action trigger. Some shooters don't like this kind of trigger,but I don't have any issues with it. The other two types of triggers are the D. A. O. Double Action Only, LEM Law Enforcement Modification Trigger. The LEM is a hybrid trigger that can work like a DAO trigger when you want to but with proper trigger control it also work like a single action trigger. Currently you will find the following variants in the USA.
1) V2 LEM with 7.5 pond trigger
2) V3 DA/SA with a decocker button located on the rear of the slide. My P30 has a 10.5 pond DA trigger pull and a 5.5 pond trigger pull in SA.
4) V3S has a manual safety.

I hope this helps, Double O.
HK told me this was normal, even though it clearly states otherwise on their website... I got a B. spring trigger job that reduced it to a clean 5+ lb pull...closer to 10 lb flat on DA
 

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I've got the P30 in v3 and a P2000sk in v2 (LEM). I'm new to handguns and thought I loved the DA/SA v3 until I took both to the range. The LEM felt much better to me. I guess the point of my post is to echo what was said above. You need to hold and shoot as many variants as you can before deciding. The good thing about HK's is they are quality handguns and there is usually a good secondary market to sell them if you make a mistake with your first purchase and want to try something else.
 

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HK told me this was normal, even though it clearly states otherwise on their website... I got a B. spring trigger job that reduced it to a clean 5+ lb pull...closer to 10 lb flat on DA
My P30 is a 2010 100% factory original. The trigger is great. It has smooth DA pull that braked cleanly and crisp clean SA pull. I read somewhere that the 2010 P30s came with the updated trigger springs.
 

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DA and DA/SA pistols are indisputably the most difficult triggers to master and maintain skills with. Why bother? Sure you can do it, but you need good professional training (not just "practice" or shooting at the range) and much time and effort,

The Glock (and now M&P) trigger system is probably the easiest to learn and maintain (and frankly better "first pistol" choices). And we can now add LEM to that list. All these have "two stage" triggers, good sear release points (after which the pistol will fire), and are about 5 pounds every time you pull the trigger.

I really hate to see anyone buy a DA/SA pistol who isn't required to by his service or agency. Conventional DA/SA HK pistols may be things of beauty (as are SIGs) but ...

The P30 V3 is DA/SA and in that hard to master and maintain category. The P30 also has an "ergo" grip. Not sure who it fits, it doesn't fit me!

Since this is a first pistol (and you want an HK) I recommend you buy a USED P2000 or USP9 Compact in LEM. Look around, these are available at very reasonable prices. Used police pistols probably define "carried much but shot little." May not be cosmetically elegant, but fully functional. USP9C can convert in an hour's time to LEM; P2000 needs to be LEM from the factory as there are no official conversions.

-- Chuck
 

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If you are considering concealed carry you may not want the P30S; depending on how you wear it, the portruding safety lever may be uncomfortable. I recommend you go for the version that is most like what you are already accustomed to shooting; having owned and shot DA/SA all my life, the V3 was the natural choice for me, especially since the realities of my professional and family life do not allow me a lot of range time to retrain for a trigger that is a lot different from what I am accustomed to. Whatever you choose, you can't do better than the P30. . . except maybe if you go for the P30L like I did!
 

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All variants- the LEMs and the DA/SA are equally appropriate for the usages you mentioned- the ideal choice is subjective. You will not be wrong by picking any of them.

I currently like the V3S because it provides options. I like options and I enjoy manipulating the V3 controls. At the range this practically means I can fire either DA or SA and I can practice the decocker and safety usage.

For home security, one could choose to have the firearm cocked with the safety on (ready to fire SA after safety is disengaged), decocked with the safety on (ready to fire DA after safety is disengaged) or decocked with the safety off (ready to fire DA).

Aside from trying what you can to make a decision, recognize that you can change your mind over time and the best advice is to jump in and practice whatever you end up with a lot.
 

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I like this post. For HD, there's nothing wrong with having to "do" something to use your firearm. It could be getting out of the bed, accessing it from a biometric, or other type of safe, etc. Flicking off a safety is one of those "conscience acts", IMO.

How solid of a sleeper are we, anyway. Face it, if someone is standing over your bed, holding a weapon on you, and you're still sleeping, it's not going to matter, is it? The bedside weapon is the last of several other measures you should take for home defense.

Lot's of folks on here talking about using their handgun to get to their rifle or shotgun. I like it. Solid advice. Guarantee you that their longguns are on safe... Food for thought.
 

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I like this post. For HD, there's nothing wrong with having to "do" something to use your firearm. It could be getting out of the bed, accessing it from a biometric, or other type of safe, etc. Flicking off a safety is one of those "conscience acts", IMO.

How solid of a sleeper are we, anyway. Face it, if someone is standing over your bed, holding a weapon on you, and you're still sleeping, it's not going to matter, is it? The bedside weapon is the last of several other measures you should take for home defense.

Lot's of folks on here talking about using their handgun to get to their rifle or shotgun. I like it. Solid advice. Guarantee you that their longguns are on safe... Food for thought.
Very important point made. I would add that preparation and training are key. I suppose if you are trained in SWAT, are a Special Operator or the like then you have the skill/mind set to react to a threat much differently than your average gun totin citizen. Know your weapon, its condition and know your own limitations. Nothing takes the place of practice. One step... two steps... doesn't matter.

Sorry if I went off topic
 
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