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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, everyone.

Have an HK4 that a relative has let go to pot.

Have it all broke down and cleaned up but buffer is disintegrated and buffer plate isn't even in.

Found this forum searching for them and hear that the buffers that Numrich is selling is no good and plates can't be found.

So looks like I am making my own.

What I need is if someone can give me the measurements of your buffer and buffer plate.

Length, width, and height of each. I know it has a curve in it, I can always grind and shape them to make the curve, I need the other dimensions.

I would be very grateful.

Doc
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the referral, gza

Am talking with him now.

If his buffer lasts, it looks good and will save me duplicating his work.

Anyone have experience with them and how many 380 rounds they are up to with the buffer still intact?


Doc

thanks for the welcome AGG
 

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I believe Spleen was keeping a round count for a while.

I haven't shot mine as it appears to be never fired outside the factory. So I'm torn over whether or not to shoot it. But I do have some of his buffers if I do choose to fire it.


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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I will be shooting mine when I get it fixed up. Can't help it. I have a gun and I gotta shoot it. :38: One of the most satisfying things for me is finding a beater at the pawn shop or getting a neglected gun like this HK4 and such, is fixing it and shooting it for the first time.

I was examining the parts of the frame that I have torn down and it looks like a few things need to be replaced. Fortunately looks like Numrich has them in stock.

It is a fine old gun.

Doc
 

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The HK4 wasn't intended to handle the .380 load. Customer demand caused HK to come up with a .380 version which was the basic HK4 with the .380 barrel. If memory serves me the early ones only came as a single caliber in .22lr, 7.65 and .25 ACP. And, I know they came in a package of .22lr and 7.65; mine had those barrels with serial numbers (SN) matching the frame SN. When I bought it, it also came with a .380 barrel with SN matching the box SN. I've also seen the HK4 offered with all four barrels SN's matching the frame SN. They are pricey!

Mine came with a nice buffer; because I heard buffers couldn't last long using the .380, I never shot that barrel. My experience with the .380 cartridge is it tends to be snappy. I shot a few rounds of .22lr. It worked well; reliable and reasonably accurate. My interest lies in shooting. Owning seven .22lr target pistols and a couple of .22lr plinkers, I soon realized the HK4 would never get much use. I turned it over to my LGS to sell.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It may have been originally introduced in other calibers, but there is nothing wrong with the gun shooting the 380.

For example, mine is in the family for over 40 years now. My father's then my brother.

I know it went to pot after my brother, but when it was with my father, I know for a fact that it had at least 5000 380 rounds thru it and maybe triple that with the 22.

Aside from the neglect, there is nothing at all wrong with it structurally/mechanically. It has handled the 380 rounds just fine and extremely accurately.

I remember when we switched to using golf tees as paper targets were no longer challenging when shooting either caliber.

Doc
 

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It may have been originally introduced in other calibers, but there is nothing wrong with the gun shooting the 380.

For example, mine is in the family for over 40 years now. My father's then my brother.

I know it went to pot after my brother, but when it was with my father, I know for a fact that it had at least 5000 380 rounds thru it and maybe triple that with the 22.

Aside from the neglect, there is nothing at all wrong with it structurally/mechanically. It has handled the 380 rounds just fine and extremely accurately.

I remember when we switched to using golf tees as paper targets were no longer challenging when shooting either caliber.

Doc
I have been told by an HK Certified Armorer who services these (@Marine0303) that indeed the .380 can have a tendency to crack the frame, especially if you do not maintain and keep a good buffer installed. He suggested not shooting the .380.

If you ever need work done on yours I would contact James, he does great work and knows these guns better than HK at this point.

If I shoot mine it will be both the .22 barrel and the .380.

I may just hold mine, not shoot it and give it to my 15 month old daughter when it is time to introduce her to shooting. I figure the .22 barrel is perfect as is the size of the pistol for her and the .380 would be a great transition as she improves (she is projected to only be 5'.2", just like her mom).
 

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I don't mean to degrade the HK4. It's a nice handgun. Personally, I'm not a fan of the .380 round. Sold all my .380 pistols with the exception of a SIG p232; leaving me with more than 1,000 rounds of .380 for that one pistol. As previously mentioned, I think the round is "snappy". But, guns and ammo are personal things. I also felt the HK4 is a little bit too complicated for my taste. I have a S&W 422, which is slightly larger than the HK4 and at least as accurate, at half the cost. And, about as simple as a semi-auto pistol can be. Having a selection of barrels of different calibers can be an advantage for some folks. Again, I stress, these choices are personal. I've also sold off all my .22lr conversion kits, including the one for a SIG p210. My wife didn't like the HK4 as much as she does that little S&W. I'm target pistol oriented.
 
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