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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have watched many,many videos about drawing from holster and even the Magpul DVD's and none of them address when and how to flip the safety off during the draw. It lools like the safety was never on and some guns do not have the side safety like the HK45c. Does anyone have links or information about the proper timing of the safely lever during the draw?
 

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Good way to shoot yourself. Safety should come off, assuming two hand conventional presentation, after both hands are joined (step 3 as taught by many trainers), as pistol is being extended towards target. Safety comes back on, if not earlier, as two hands separate and prior to pistol coming back to step three, when re-holstering.
 

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Good way to shoot yourself. Safety should come off after both hands are joined (step 3 as taught by many trainers) as pistol is being extended towards target.
I can see your point if you're carrying cocked and locked but drawing a DA pistol with the safety off is no more dangerous than drawing a DAO pistol that has no safety or for that matter a revolver. I think that before this goes into debate that a little bit of clarification needs to occur.
 

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I can see your point if you're carrying cocked and locked but drawing a DA pistol with the safety off is no more dangerous than drawing a DAO pistol that has no safety or for that matter a revolver. I think that before this goes into debate that a little bit of clarification needs to occur.
Thank you, I was assuming cocked and locked, just like a 1911. That said, since the HK is capable of cocked and locked carry, I treat the thumb safety just like the thumb safety on a 1911 or the squeeze cocker on a P7, and activate it after my hands join, lest that HK 45C be in condition one that day and there be a loud surprise. Not sure how a DA HK45C is disadvantaged by treating the thumb safety the same way as if it is in condition one?
 

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Thank you, I was assuming cocked and locked, just like a 1911. That said, since the HK is capable of cocked and locked carry, I treat the thumb safety just like the thumb safety on a 1911 or the squeeze cocker on a P7, and activate it after my hands join, lest that HK 45C be in condition one that day and there be a loud surprise. Not sure how a DA HK45C is disadvantaged by treating the thumb safety the same way as if it is in condition one?
OK, but what if you need to draw and shoot one handed.
 

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Assuming dominant hand only, safety comes off same place as with two hands. Support hand, assuming you are transferring from dominant to support, safety comes off just before transferring the pistol to support hand. If this isn't a "drill," and your dominant hand/arm is injured you need to work something out appropriate to your holster, where the pistol is and your injury. Assuming no ambi safety on the HK 45 family, you typically would use your support hand thumb to move safety lever, as it is too late to have an LEM trigger put in. :)

Sounds like you might benefit from some quality training, or at the least, buy the new Scotty Reitz book that describes this in detail with pictures.
 

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Three minutes and your questions will be answered. Sit back and watch the video.

Safety comes off at Step 3 (called Click for a reason).

Note your finger goes to the trigger at Step 4 (Smack) and you're applying trigger pressure on the trigger from that point on. Complete the trigger press at the first acceptable sight picture (flash sight picture). With the LEM trigger you should have all the slack out of the first stage rather quickly so you can feel the trip point before the sights align.

I don't recall how much slack there is in a V1 or V9 in SA mode. In V1/D3 DA mode, though, there's a lot and no felt sear point - a liability to good first shots.

-- Chuck
 

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But, if you are drawing to the low ready or "guard" position, safety doesn't come off at all. This stuff is important and potentially dangerous, doesn't lend itself to brief exchanges on a forum, and is why quality instruction is so important.

That said, I don't know any competent instructor teaching that you move the thumb safety on a cocked and locked pistol to the fire position in the holster, or before the muzzle has been rotated towards the target.
 

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But, if you are drawing to the low ready or "guard" position, safety doesn't come off at all. This stuff is important and potentially dangerous, doesn't lend itself to brief exchanges on a forum, and is why quality instruction is so important.

That said, I don't know any competent instructor teaching that you move the thumb safety on a cocked and locked pistol to the fire position in the holster, or before the muzzle has been rotated towards the target.
I agree:
Even when you do what Chuck Taylor called a “speed rock” drill (starting with hands clear of the gun and making a two-shot speed rock in a second flat at arm's length targets, which is a part of his Master course.) you do not move the thumb safety on a cocked and locked pistol to the fire position in the holster, or before the muzzle has been rotated towards the target.

RJ
 

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Good way to shoot yourself. Safety should come off, assuming two hand conventional presentation, after both hands are joined (step 3 as taught by many trainers), as pistol is being extended towards target. Safety comes back on, if not earlier, as two hands separate and prior to pistol coming back to step three, when re-holstering.
Ditto... That's what I teach and have seen taught at other classes.

Dry-fire practice drawing from the holster in ultra slow motion, stopping at several points along the way to check grip, alignment, safety, trigger finger, etc. REMEMBER: the booger hook stays off the trigger thingy until your sights are on target and THEN moves on the trigger thingy when you're ready to shoot.

Most common points to stop and evaluate yourself at is...
- when your hand grips the gun in the holster... make sure your grip is good from the start.
- when your support hand meets the gun hand in front of your chest. Once your support hand is gripping the gun, sweep off the safety and now you have the proper thumbs forward grip.
- punch arms out towards the target as you aquire the sights, prep trigger and take the shot.

Your best bet though is to take some quality firearms instruction. Be aware that the quality of instruction varies - not all instructors are as safety minded as I feel they should be. I've been the one pointing/calling the instructor trainees on "sweeping" violations during the instructor training program...

Also, one of my students took another class after taking an Introduction to Handgun Competition class I co-teach and he took the instructor to task for the poor instruction on drawing from a holster and reloading technique.
 

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This is way over thinking it. Just start practicing until you start doing it right. It really doesn't matter how you do it, as long as you do it well.

And who cares when the safety goes off.. if your finger isn't on the trigger it won't go boom.
 

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This is way over thinking it. Just start practicing until you start doing it right. It really doesn't matter how you do it, as long as you do it well.

And who cares when the safety goes off.. if your finger isn't on the trigger it won't go boom.
This.



Just make sure it is off by the time you are on target. There is no set in stone way to do it. Hence the reason why there are so many different classes, and methods. I don't use a saftey when carrying because it is one extra step. I decock and put it away with one in the chamber, if I need to use it, the DA is my saftey, and if there is time, I will cock it to SA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for all your responses. My main concern was when to take the safety off during the draw without losing proper pistol grip. From my practice, the best way for me is to correctly grip the pistol in the holster, draw the gun up to my support hand and then flip the safety down. Then my grip is proper for the thrust forward to aim and shoot.

Another way I have heard mentioned is the "cocked and locked" method. The only difference is that the first shot will need much less trigger pull because you are in the single action mode.
Anyone have preferences to either the cocked & locked or the uncocked and locked?

No matter which one you choose, I think it is important to do it the same way every time and practice that move over and over.
 

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There is no need to carry a DA or DA/SA pistol with the safety ON. In fact, I consider it to be a liability as it's just something else to fumble with. Slide mounted safeties (thankfully HK has none I'm aware of) are particularly difficult to switch off during the draw stroke.

And (nagging again!) if you have a pistol with a safety (any pistol or rifle) you MUST insure it's OFF every time, even it you never safe it. Things happen like bad magic when they're not wanted. You should thumb the V1 safety off your USP every time -- or it will be magically and possibly tragically set to safe in that infamous 0200 dark parking lot. If you like or are required to carry DA/SA the V3 detent is maybe ten bucks. De-cock only so you can skip depressing the lever.

Finger goes on the trigger when the weapon is pointed toward the target ("Smack" in Gunsite parlance and the linked video). This is long before the sights are on the target. Trigger press is completed the microsecond the sights align in a acceptable sight picture. Acceptable, not perfect.

Drawing to low ready is different than drawing to shoot. Thumb on top of the safety (if there is one) finger off the trigger.

-- Chuck
 

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Three minutes and your questions will be answered. Sit back and watch the video.

Safety comes off at Step 3 (called Click for a reason).

Note your finger goes to the trigger at Step 4 (Smack) and you're applying trigger pressure on the trigger from that point on. Complete the trigger press at the first acceptable sight picture (flash sight picture). With the LEM trigger you should have all the slack out of the first stage rather quickly so you can feel the trip point before the sights align.
yeah, step 3. Rotate to target and safety off simultaneously.
 
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