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So I'm at approximately 1500 rounds through my VP9 and it's really starting to feel fully broken in. The action is smooth, trigger has gotten a little better and the feed ramp is starting to be really shiny.

I have been almost obsessive with cleaning it and each time I have used a little less Slip2000 than the last time. It has gotten to the point where everything feels buttery smooth without even relubricating the barrel, slide or rails. I ran 400+ rounds through it almost dry and it ran flawlessly.

Should I continue to apply a light coating of Slip2000 on most "wear points" or if it's running super smooth without it, will it just collect junk?

Thanks in advance!
 

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I haven't used Slip2000, but my understanding is it's the same as FrogLube which is what I use. I've been using that for a while now, and I do run it pretty "dry". Heat the surfaces up with a heat gun or hair dryer, apply the FrogLube and let it sit for a few minutes and then wipe dry. It creates a slicker surface that resists wear without the need for "wet" lube surface, and just wipes clean. I wouldn't say I "scrub it dry" I leave a little visible shine of lube on the wear surfaces, but not wet. I do clean mine after every competition or every couple range sessions, but cleaning at this point takes only a few minutes. I have about 1500 rounds through it now after switching to FrogLube from Hoppe's Elite, and I'll never go back to petroleum-based cleaner/lube again.
 

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Just run a light coat of Slip 2000 on everything and you'll be good to go. It will also make cleaning much easier. Just enough to where it looks slightly wet. That's all you need.


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I clean and lube my VP9s after each range session and have about the same 1500 rounds through my black one as the OP. I don't use Slip 2000 gun oil but I do use Slip's 2000 grease on the rails. I'm of the school that believes where metal is sliding on metal it needs grease, but only a light touch of grease.

I also don't change my cleaning/lubing procedure on my guns regardless of how many rounds that gun has through it. As far as brands of lubricants I have an even dozen different gun oils and five different gun greases on my workbench. I can tell little functional difference between them. Some I won't buy again because of smell (Ballistol) or other reason but they all seem to work.

I don't use FrogLube but I don't think it and Slip 2000 are the same.
 

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I put a drop or two everywhere where metal rubs on metal and spread with my fingers. This usually results in what most might consider more than necessary lube, but it's not like it's dripping off. I cycle the action and trigger several times, maybe shake it around a bit, and then wipe off anything that runs to the outside. Except the barrel hood, I spread/rub that in more with my finger. I'm mildly OCD and trying to protect from wear as best I can.
 

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Like Brodie I have several lubes and several greases available on my workbench. I like a light application of SlideGlide on the rails no matter what oil is used.
 

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I always clean and lube with Breakfree CLP after each range trip, I also put a drop on the wear spots.

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I haven't used Slip2000, but my understanding is it's the same as FrogLube which is what I use.
They are not even close. Slip2000 is synthetic and I believe MIL-SPEC-63460E rated. Froglube is plant based and many problems have been reported in using it in firearms including mold growing on it and turning sap like to the point of preventing a pistol from firing when it migrated into firing pin channel.

Froglube fail X2.....,,, - SIG Talk
 

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I use M-Pro 7 products on all my 'funs'. Seems to work very well, cleaning is a breeze, and even my most frequently used VP9 (over 10K rounds thus far) looks like day I bought it.

I use MPro 7 grease on rail tabs, MPro7 LPX elsewhere, for range guns, no grease on EDC, just oil and not a whole lot.
 

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Slip2000 EWL, applied as per the Owners Manual, after every cleaning, works for me.

Magazines disassembled every other range session or so. Wiped out, assembled dry.

1,900+ rounds, 0 malfunctions.
 

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In response to the title of your post, I never shoot while I am lubricated.

Sorry............I could not resist
 

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I use Hoppes oil with the needle applicator, not too wet, works like a champ
 

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They are not even close. Slip2000 is synthetic and I believe MIL-SPEC-63460E rated. Froglube is plant based and many problems have been reported in using it in firearms including mold growing on it and turning sap like to the point of preventing a pistol from firing when it migrated into firing pin channel.

Froglube fail X2.....,,, - SIG Talk
I didn't mean the products are the same, I meant the application of the products are the same, i.e. apply and then wipe off the excess and not run them "wet" which was the topic of this thread. I personally have had great luck with FrogLube, as have many local competition shooters I shoot with, and I've found that when applied correctly (with heat, and then wiped off) it does work as advertised and cleaning gets easier over time and carbon does not "stick" to the surface like it used to when I was using Hoppes. I have a friend who is a federal firearms instructor, and their armorer switched to FrogLube last year and is using it on all of their department's handguns and rifles, and swears by it. For every negative FrogLube review out there, there's a positive one to offset it, and there have been MILLIONS of firearm failures over the years with other lubes as well, which to me means it has much more to do with the routine used than it does with the specific lube being used. Just about any lube will "work", it's more about what you want to get out of it, and what your routine is, and will that produce a reliable result. It just like asking which oil to use in your Mustang or Porsche, there are gobs of people who swear by Mobile 1, Castrol or Amsoil, and gobs who will setup and say that each of those is the worst thing ever.
 

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I didn't mean the products are the same, I meant the application of the products are the same, i.e. apply and then wipe off the excess and not run them "wet" which was the topic of this thread. I personally have had great luck with FrogLube, as have many local competition shooters I shoot with, and I've found that when applied correctly (with heat, and then wiped off) it does work as advertised and cleaning gets easier over time and carbon does not "stick" to the surface like it used to when I was using Hoppes. I have a friend who is a federal firearms instructor, and their armorer switched to FrogLube last year and is using it on all of their department's handguns and rifles, and swears by it. For every negative FrogLube review out there, there's a positive one to offset it, and there have been MILLIONS of firearm failures over the years with other lubes as well, which to me means it has much more to do with the routine used than it does with the specific lube being used. Just about any lube will "work", it's more about what you want to get out of it, and what your routine is, and will that produce a reliable result. It just like asking which oil to use in your Mustang or Porsche, there are gobs of people who swear by Mobile 1, Castrol or Amsoil, and gobs who will setup and say that each of those is the worst thing ever.
To each his own. If you like it, feel free.

I did have a question for you.

Can you address this assertion in the Froglube literature:

"The second part of reducing excess lies in the fact that FrogLube CLP products absorb into metal. "

Do you believe this is true?

If so, at a molecular level, how does this actually occur?
 

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To each his own. If you like it, feel free.

I did have a question for you.

Can you address this assertion in the Froglube literature:

"The second part of reducing excess lies in the fact that FrogLube CLP products absorb into metal. "

Do you believe this is true?

If so, at a molecular level, how does this actually occur?
I have no idea, I'm not a scientist, whether it actually absorbs into the metal or just creates a surface treatment is not something that I would waste 2 seconds thinking about. What I do know is that when I apply it with heat, let it "sit", then wipe off the excess, the surface has a "slick" feeling to it, the weapon cycles beautifully for hundreds of rounds, and when I go to clean it most carbon residue just wipes right off. This has been true of my pistols and rifles both since I've been using it. The bolt carriers on my AR's love this stuff too. When I was using Hoppes Elite cleaner/lube after a couple hundred rounds it was a LOT more work to get the weapon clean again. So not speaking "scientifically", because that's theoretical, speaking "practically" I like how it works and will continue using it, regardless of whether someone could publish an article in a science journal about WHY it works. Some things just "work" and that's good enough for me.
 

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To each his own. If you like it, feel free.

I did have a question for you.

Can you address this assertion in the Froglube literature:

"The second part of reducing excess lies in the fact that FrogLube CLP products absorb into metal. "

Do you believe this is true?

If so, at a molecular level, how does this actually occur?
I don't know that I would buy that claim for a few reasons, primary of which is that surface treatments, such as Nitriding or anodizing, are performed with the specific purpose of providing a relatively impermeable layer on the surface of a part, in order to prevent contamination (such as leeching or oxidation) of the metal or alloy beneath. This doesn't mean that it can't or won't happen, or that such a surface won't wear down, in theory, over time through abrasive action or chemical interaction. This is pulling from my experience and knowledge gained from kicking around paintball for a fair span of time, but gallium and mercury will both eat away at aluminum pretty severely after exposure, and aluminum oxidizes pretty swiftly when exposed to open air, but the oxide layer is fairly inert, chemically. Powdered aluminum, for those who don't know, is actually an explosive, the oxide that rapidly forms on large surfaces made of the stuff is what keeps sheet stock from just randomly and violently bursting into flames.

Does this mean your aluminum-framed gun is going to take your hand off? No. You need a pretty sizable surface to mass ratio for that to work, and a pretty notable source of point heat on top of that. What it does mean is that, molecularly speaking, something needs to attack that oxide layer and keep it from reforming before a foreign material can pull itself into the crystalline structure of the material beneath it.

In the case of steel, and surface treatments, you can still get rapid, albeit still much slower, oxidation from it, with household materials (steel wool actually burns incredibly effectively, the finer, the better...). It can also be prone to leeching by a wide variety of materials under certain conditions, such as high heat, a trait to which anyone who has taken up a welding torch can attest. That said, it can also be chemically treated to prevent this, which is what a lot of these treatments on modern guns are taking advantage of.

So, all that background laid out (I'm not an engineer or metallurgist by any stretch, so if I get things wrong here, please feel free to correct me...), we can get to the meat of the question: does it work the way it says it does? Unless it has some way to work into, or through, a chemically treated or physically applied non-metallic finish, my bet lands firmly on "no", barring the heat needed for application somehow compromising the finish on the part, in which case, guns get hot all on their own, this doesn't bode well for the finish in question with heavy use. Does this mean it can't get everywhere it needs to be? No. Oils and some other polymers under heat can have a pretty minimal surface tension, and can be notoriously difficult to remove without chemical assistance, and can firm up
pretty solidly when heated properly (as anyone who works with chocolate or sugar can attest to...), so thorough lubrication is at least plausible here. That said, being some sort of polymer lubricant, this does raise some other questions as to FrogLube's properties under relatively rapid heating and cooling, such as shooting outdoors on a bitter, dry winter day. Will it seize up, or hold only to it's own backing surfaces, namely, the gun parts it's applied to?

TL;DR version: maybe, but it just raises more questions if it does. Just a bit of food for thought. I've got no horse in this race, and Ballistol works just fine for me in my day to day uses.
 

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I use Fireclean for all my firearms and follow the application instructions. It's a very light amount after the initial application. The guns clean extremely easy and run well.
 

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I use Fireclean for all my firearms and follow the application instructions. It's a very light amount after the initial application. The guns clean extremely easy and run well.
^^^ This. I'm on close to 1900 rounds without a cleaning since my last application of FC.
 
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