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Did you use the break in procedure from PTR91?

  • Used "proper" break in procedure.

    Votes: 5 23.8%
  • Did not use "proper" break in procedure.

    Votes: 16 76.2%
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That is JLD and not PTR. I received no such instructions with my 2009 era PTR and in over 920 rds so far it's done fine. I do clean the chamber after every shoot
 

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Its good that they define cool down, so you know exactly when cool has occurred.

It turns out my JDL was chambered in Reminton UMC... Crap I'd stocked up on american eagle. :wink:
 

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Its funny, they used to send instructions telling you how to "brake" in the gun. Now, PTR's website tells you to fire 250 rounds and see if your trunnion will break. How things can change...

I have never "broken in" a gun, and probably never will. If blasting bullets down the barrel with 50,000 or so PSI behind it doesn't affect the barrel or rifling, I don't think the bore brush with some solvent will have much to say.
 

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I broke in my PTR with 4 full auto mag dumps, just held the trigger down till the mags went dry. Only thing I did was measure and record the bolt gap when I got it. Speaking of, I should check.....
 

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I didnt. I dont think I read the manual. The need for barrel break-in was invented by gunwriters in the 1990s. Heres a email exchange found on the internet from Gale
McMillan of the firearm company.

I'm sure this has been discussed many times before but I'll post it anyway.

From: Gale McMillan <" gale"@mcmfamily.com>
Newsgroups: rec.guns
Subject: Re: Barrel break-in necessary?
Date: 7 Jan 1997 20:40:25 -0500

Mike Sumner wrote:
> ...

As a barrel maker I have looked in thousands of new and used barrels
with a bore scope and I will tell you that if every one followed the
prescribed break in method A very large number would do more harm than
help. The reason you hear of the help in accuracy is because if you
chamber barrel with a reamer that has a dull throater instead of cutting
clean sharp rifling it smears a burr up on the down wind side of the
rifling. It takes from 1 to 2 hundred rounds to burn this bur out and
the rifle to settle down and shoot its best. Any one who chambers rifle
barrels has tolerances on how dull to let the reamer get and factories
let them go longer than any competent smithe would. Another tidbit to
consider, Take a 300Win Mag. that has a life expectancy of 1000 rounds.
Use 10% of it up with your break in procedure for ever 10 barrels the
barrel maker makes he has to make one more just to take care of the
break in. no wonder barrel makers like to see this. Now when you flame
me on this please include what you think is happening to the inside of
your barrel during the break in that is helping you.

Gale McMillan
NBSRA IBS,FCSA and NRA Life Member

From: Gale McMillan <[email protected]>
Newsgroups: rec.guns
Subject: Re: Good barrels for Rem 700 in .308?
Date: 10 Feb 1996 12:50:53 -0500

Consider this, every round shot in breaking in a barrel is one round off
the life of said rifle barrel. No one has ever told me the physical
reason of what happens during break in firing. In other words to the
number of pounds of powder shot at any given pressure, is the life of the
barrel. No one has ever explained what is being accomplished by
shooting and cleaning in any prescribed method. Start your barrel off
with 5 rounds and clean it thoroughly and do it again. Nev Maden a
friend down under that my brother taught to make barrels was the one who
come up with the break in method. He may think he has come upon
something, or he has come up with another way to sell barrels. I feel
that the first shot out of a barrel is its best and every one after that
deteriorates until the barrel is gone. If some one can explain what
physically takes place during break in to modify the barrel then I may
change my mind. As the physical properties of a barrel doesn't change
because of the break in procedures it means it's all hog wash. I am open
to any suggestions that can be documented otherwise if it is just
someone's opinion forget it.

Gale McMillan
From: Gale McMillan <" gale"@mcmfamily.com>
Newsgroups: rec.guns
Subject: Re: Remington 700 break in
Date: 8 Aug 1997 00:01:07 -0400

Arthur Sprague wrote:

# On 29 Jul 1997 22:50:26 -0400, [email protected] (John W. Engel)
# wrote:
#
# #This is how (some) benchrester break in barrels, and it does work.
# #The mechanism is that the bore has pores in it (microns in size).
# #If you simply shoot a box or two through it without cleaning, the
# #pores fill up with gilding metal, and stay that way. If you
# #follow the above procedure (and they mean *clean* between shots!),
# #the pores are "smoothed over" with each successive shot. A barrel
# #correctly broken in is MUCH easier to clean than one that is
# #not. If it is a good quality tube, it will also be more accurate.
# #Regards,
# #whit
#
# Well, the range hours here are quite limited. On my first trip I
# managed to fire a whole fourteen rounds, with a thorough cleaning
# after each round. It couldn't hurt! Fun gun! Difficult to think of
# .223 as a battle round after experience with .30-06 and .45ACP, but it
# surely going to be a pleasure to shoot.
# Thanks to all for their advice.

This is total hogwash! It all got started when a barrel maker that I
know started putting break in instructions in the box with each barrel
he shipped a few years ago. I asked him how he figured it would help
and his reply was If they shoot 100 rounds breaking in this barrel
that's total life is 3000 rounds and I make 1000 barrels a year just
figure how many more barrels I will get to make. He had a point it
defiantly will shorten the barrel life. I have been a barrel maker a
fair amount of time and my barrels have set and reset bench rest world
records so many times I quit keeping track (at one time they held 7 at
one time) along with HighPower,Silloett,smallbore national and world
records and my instructions were to clean as often as posable preferably
every 10 rounds. I inspect every barrel taken off and every new barrel
before it is shipped with a bore scope and I will tell you all that I
see far more barrels ruined by cleaning rods than I see worn out from
normal wear and tear.I am even reading about people recommending
breaking in pistols. As if it will help their shooting ability or the
guns.
Gale Mc.
 

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I've fired several thousand rounds in my AW serial numbered gun.

I run a bore brush and patch w ballistol through barrel after firing and wipe gun down before putting the weapon away for any length of time.

The gun normally sits in the unheated/un- aircondtioned and damp garage.

I clean it w/ chlorinated brake cleaner and then ballistol when it gets real dirty.

It goes bang w/ every type of surplus- brass or steel case ammo that I run in it.

Its more accurate then I am.
 

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First post. I just registered and this is probably the tenth thread I have read. My brand new unfired PTR 91SC is still waiting to be "broken in".

This has been an interesting read for sure and the "argument" on both sides is very hard to fully understand. Sort of like believing in god.

Let me say that PTR currently ships with a manual that tells you to clean and lube the gun, leaving the chamber and barrel dry to begin with. Fire one round and clean the barrel. Repeat for a total of ten rounds and then start cleaning eery 10 or 20 rounds till you fire 250-300 rounds.

The barrel may or may not need to be broken in and the "pores" might or might not need to be "smoothed over". But for sure there is a descent amount of metal moving around and a lot of machines require a break in for those metal on metal moving surfaces can mate up and smooth out. I am a Jet engine mechanic and have been in the auto repair environment since early childhood. All engines and transmissions need to break in as do all jet engines and associated gear boxes etc. Another gun I own that required break in is a Ruger SR22 pistol in .22LR. The gun will fail to load on lower velocity rounds until you get a few boxes through it to loosen everything up.

I do not plan to go through the recommended break in of my PTR1 because it is a huge hassle and I think it would definitely take a dent out of the barrel life. But I do anticipate some loading and ejection issues for the first few hundred rounds. If the rifle has problems after the first 300 rounds they are gonna be hating me for sure as they will if that barrel does not last a good while.

I look forward to getting out in the dirt and dialing in the sights and the tactical scope I have laying in my toybox.

out...
 

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Any weapon is a learning curve.. I break mine in just to be sure there are no factory defects, to sight it in with irons and optics, and to train in the operational controls
 

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I feel the firearm is breaking ME in and I am learning IT. The gun is more accurate than I am. I know this. I agree with Gale- nobody seems to have any idea what physically is different before, during and after the break-in period by following the prescribed method. But it's a free country and people can do what they wish.
 

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I will do the first ten rounds as the manual specifies, cleaning the bore after each round. It only takes a minute to rod the bore a few times so it's not that big of a deal. After that I will just shoot as normal and clean the gun after each shoot. I hope to get out to the dirt this weekend and send a hundred rounds down range. If I go by myself I could eat up 300 round in a matter of minutes, having 18 loaded 20rd mags set up to go. Got to love cheaper than dirt. But If I shoot without the kids a feel guilty so I will probably make it a family shoot and hike so a hundred rounds is a reasonable goal to shoot for.
 

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Yeah right. I fired 60 rounds of the filthy disgusting SA ammo. Went home & cleaned the gun. The inside of the gun was putrid, but I cleaned it real good. I've probably fired about 600 rounds of the tar sealed SA ammo through my JLD gun, & it has never missed a beat. Not one single jam. Mine was one of the first carbine models that came with the 93 handguards. GARY
 

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The only guns that get a break in from me are the ones geared for precision work. Every manufacturer has a different recommended process for break in. Some are 30 rounds. Some are 100 rounds, Etc. etc... All others get shot and cleaned when needed. I've noticed that barrels with a higher degree of polish in the bore clean better and retain less carbon and copper. Some shoot better dirtier. It normally takes a process of shooting and cleaning to find out what it performs the best with. Both of my PTR owner manuals don't say anything about barrel break in, only recommended cleaning procedure. There are the older JLD's.
 

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I keep reading here and there about GREASE as part of the lubing of these rifles. If this is the case, what parts are to be greased. I only put a very light dose of oil on parts that move against other parts when I lube all my other guns. Like the bootom of the bolt where it engages the hammer and the lugs and grooves of the action etc.
 

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I keep reading here and there about GREASE as part of the lubing of these rifles. If this is the case, what parts are to be greased. I only put a very light dose of oil on parts that move against other parts when I lube all my other guns. Like the bootom of the bolt where it engages the hammer and the lugs and grooves of the action etc.
I run grease on the high load areas. Locking piece and rollers.

Also a little on the raills the carrier rubs on, the loose tolerances there make grease a better option.
 

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I use synthetic motor oil on my roller locks. it sticks in place and is less restrictive than grease
 
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