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lol

I used a 5 gallon bucket here. You still need to cover the bucket with a blanket or a good thermal jacket that you can zip and dont mind getting dyed. lol Make sure to leave in there overnight and keep as warm as possiblel. Easy DIY job though. I would remove all the metal parts that are possible just for safety against rust imho.
 

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When converting a SL8 to G36 or a USC to UMP most desire that authentic,great(AKA EVIL as the anti-gun culture favors) black color. Many SL8 and USC are gray. These "plastic" parts are a polymer that need to be "dyed" to darken the color.
 

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A friend of mine used this on a white KELTEC pistol the other day.It worked excellent.Very handy to know this info.
 

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I was thinking about dyeing a new set of green wide hand guards for my G3 build and also dyeing the green FMP buttstock that came with my parts kit. Would the same black-to-green ratio be a good mix? Has anyone dyed old G3 furniture? I'm curious if it comes out evenly colored or if I'll have a problem with it looking splotchy.
 

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Looks decent but I would have gone with Duracoat for a "do-it-yourself job", you spent hard earned money on your system why not protect it properly instead of the "Ghetto Dye Job" . Nohting against you but I personally wouldn't have gone that way!
My dad is a lacrosse coach and they use the same stuff to dye their heads. If it holds up during lacrosse, it should hold up just fine on a firearm!

They do some fancy stuff too, cover it in hot glue and the dye won't take there, so you could dye yellow for example, string hot glue over it, dye black, and you get a SWEET effect. Would look corny on a gun but you know, some people are into that. =D
 

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Very good thread, does anyone know the dyebrand "DYLON" here in France they don't sell RIT. I thry'd to have it shipped, but due to restrictions it's not possible.:(:
 

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guy at the gunstore told me about this idea last week...I went ahead and tried it on a tan colored lower that I bought for my 94 clone...I cut all the ingredients in half since I had a smaller bucket...Lower came out not too bad...a little charcoal greyish instead of deep black...I wouldn't have any qualms against using it
 

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I've done a couple USC's now with the following process and all of them came out almost an exact match for the Navy lowers that went on them. Most if not all of this is just rehashed from this and other threads, but I thought I'd post exactally what worked for me anyway.

1. After complete disassembly, degrease the hell out of the receiver using a biodegradable degreaser like Chomp, Purple Power, or one of the orange ones from Lowe's.

2. Rinse it under the hottest tap water you can get for about 5 min making sure to get all the grease, oil, and degreaser out of the nooks and crannies.

3. Find a disposable aluminum turkey roasting pan big enough for the part, put RIT dye in the 4 black to 1 dark green ratio and mix well with warm water.

4. Place your part(s) into the pan ensuring all surfaces are covered with water, cover the pan with foil and put it in the oven at 190° for 4-5 hours periodically checking to ensure all parts are still covered.

5. After that time, shut off the oven and let stand overnight or until the pan is cool to the touch.

6. Remove pan from the oven, drain, and rinse part(s) thoroughly with hot water. Be careful to rinse all over as the dye has a tendency to congeal when it cools and you may get blobs hiding in the crevices.

7. After the part(s) is rinsed and completely dry, wipe the part with WD40 and reassemble.

I found that HK leaves a lot of molding flash on the receivers and I like to use some 220 grit paper to remove that before I dye. I have had luck removing light flash after dyeing but you do run the risk of cutting through to gray. You also need to be careful as any sanding marks you put in will show through the black. --ST
 

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I use a similar method, but I use the stove so I can periodically rotate the parts both to keep the solution mixed up, and so that the points touching the bottom of the pan are constantly being exposed to the dye mix. Remember to keep the level high if it's not covered, as water will boil off.

I use a long rectangular stainless pan I bought at a gun show. I use the same pan for parkerizing. By using the long skinny pan, I can use the minimum amount of water which keeps the dye concentration as high as possible.

I'd thought of using the oven as well, it would work good too.
 

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The first USC I did I was really concerned about rotating everything. While in the middle of the second though, I had to leave for what should have been 20 min but turned into 5 hours or so and, quite by accident, I found that the dye was still able to permiate even without being moved. Now I just roll them about half way through and call it good.
I like the oven mainly because I think it heats more evenly. Might just be me thinking though. --ST
 

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I've wondered how deeply the die penetrates. If not too deeply, it might almost look cool do dye a gray USC before cutting the cooling slots. Then you'd have contrasting cooling slots where they cut through the gray material.
 

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Next one I do, I think I'll toss in a stock or trigger pack or something (if he doesn't want them back) and then mill a slot to see just how far it does go. Dave, you might have an idea there, that or it may be a good way to highlight SBR info if you're so inclined. --ST
 

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One note I have on this topic is that if you want to keep the red and white markings on the USC stock and lower you can't do it for too long without them fading out. My first dye job I did for 24 hours in the cooler and the markings are almost completely gone. Read my post on the one I did for SJHK for only about 12 hours total in a cooler. Color black was great and we kept the markings bright red and white.

http://hkpro.com/forum/showthread.php?t=100185

He moved the pics but I assure you the markings came out unscathed, just like on the factory black USCs.
 

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I saw someone asked farther up the thread but I didn't see an answer, Can this method be used on a USP to go from say Black to Tan?
 
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