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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have finally decided what I want to have engraved, and I have to send the gun to Ford's next week when it arrives at my FFL, but I am having a problem figuring out where to engrave, especially because I dont have the USPc yet, so I cant see it in person. I have outlined the two areas that would work in red on a photo I found online. I am engraving a sentence which will look just as good on one line as it will on two. Which area do you guys think makes more sense when it comes down to visibility, wear, aesthetics, etc.


 

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The large area to the rear. I would not engrave the front area you have marked, in case you decide to go with serrations later, thats where they will be placed. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The large area to the rear. I would not engrave the front area you have marked, in case you decide to go with serrations later, thats where they will be placed. :)
If Ford's did front serations I would have it done, but Im not going to send it out twice...I dont want them that bad.
 

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I agree with the above poster but for a different reason. I think if you did it on small area the overall look of the gun may make it look too "busy" and you will loose any first glance recognition as it will be jumbled in by make and model above and serial markings etc to the right.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Did you go with my yippie-kai-yay line?
no, but it got honorable mention (sort of) lol.


The sentence will either look like:

Si vis pacem, para bellum

or

Si vis pacem
para bellum


probably put it in all caps or capitalize the first letter of each word...not sure yet on formatting.
 

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Hopefully someone on here can do a nice photoshop job for you. I think it would look best above the serial numbers.
 

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+1 to the rear.

It would look more, like it was supposed to be there.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The more I look at it the more I agree with the comment that it would look too busy up front. I think I like the quote separated into to lines instead of using the comma as well.
 

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Here is one down and dirty...


Be Safe
Gayle
 

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+1 for the rear location... too bad Ford's doesn't do serations, I really like compacts with front serations....

good luck..
 

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Discussion Starter #15

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JL put it on the other side though, so that side isnt 'nakie' (naked/bare) hehehe :)

Just forward of the ejection port, on the top wide 'flat', it would fit in one line...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
JL put it on the other side though, so that side isnt 'nakie' (naked/bare) hehehe :)

Just forward of the ejection port, on the top wide 'flat', it would fit in one line...
I was going to put it on the same place in both sides...Im big on symmetry. But that also has possibility because it could be bigger...hmm more things to think about. I still like the idea of it being on both sides though...
 

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That will look good too, the right side wont be so lonely. ;)

*I would only put it on the right side* :)

*Concept 'Para'* ;)

 

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i kind of like having something on the right side too. i feel like my guns are lonely over there, but since i'm a righty i don't see that side.

come to think of it what i mostly see is the front sight!

please check the spelling of the quote. i'm not a latin expert but i can conclude that there is a debate going on as to which rendering is correct

si vis pacem para bellum (this seems to be the most widely accepted translation but i'm not really sure what's correct. i know enough latin to get myself into trouble...

here's some of my research (I would call a local latin professor and make sure, explain it's being engraved. stroke his ego and get your info.):

the word sic means thus or so in latin. according to one source i've found si means if.

Background of the phrase
__________________________________________________
Qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum
A maxim often paraphrased as "Si vis pacem, para bellum." The eminently reasonable philosophy that ,"If you would have peace, prepare for war." The English version is often back-rendered as "Si vis pacem, para bellum." This sentiment is attributed to Flavius Vegetius Renatus, who wrote in the "De re militari" (390 B.C.E.): "Qui desiderat pacem, bellum praeparat; nemo provocare ne offendere audet quem intelliget superiorem esse pugnaturem". (Whosoever desires peace prepares for war; no one provokes, nor dares to offend, those who they know know to be superior in battle.) -someone else

_____________________________________
Si vis pacem, para bellum is a Latin adage translated as, "If you seek peace, prepare for war". The source of this adage remains unknown;[1] however, it is universally believed, rightly or wrongly, to be based on a quotation from Roman military writer Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus: Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.[2] The saying is one of many from or based on his work, Epitoma rei militaris, possibly written around the year 390 AD.

There is a subtle difference in the grammar of the two statements. The first is emphatic, or vivid. It is a conditional sentence introduced by an adverbial clause with a verb in the indicative mood. Ordinarily one would expect a main verb in the indicative but the author switches to the imperative mood. The result is a peremptory "if you really desire peace, prepare for war."

The sentence from Vegetius is a hypothesis. It is a less vivid conditional sentence, in suppositional or should-would construction with an adjectival clause and both verbs in the subjunctive mood: "whoever therefore should desire peace would prepare for war."-wikipedia
 

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Discussion Starter #20
i kind of like having something on the right side too. i feel like my guns are lonely over there, but since i'm a righty i don't see that side.

come to think of it what i mostly see is the front sight!

please check the spelling of the quote. i'm not a latin expert but i can conclude that there is a debate going on as to which rendering is correct

si vis pacem para bellum (this seems to be the most widely accepted translation but i'm not really sure what's correct. i know enough latin to get myself into trouble...

here's some of my research (I would call a local latin professor and make sure, explain it's being engraved. stroke his ego and get your info.):

the word sic means thus or so in latin. i'm unable to find a latin rendering, declension or use of this word to make it si. although i can find numerous references to si in latin. probably use si to mean if instead of sic (thus or so) to form a question instead of thus or so it means if. it's probably a fine point of grammar that is beyond me-dmg311

Background of the phrase
__________________________________________________
Qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum
A maxim often paraphrased as "Si vis pacem, para bellum." The eminently reasonable philosophy that ,"If you would have peace, prepare for war." The English version is often back-rendered as "Si vis pacem, para bellum." This sentiment is attributed to Flavius Vegetius Renatus, who wrote in the "De re militari" (390 B.C.E.): "Qui desiderat pacem, bellum praeparat; nemo provocare ne offendere audet quem intelliget superiorem esse pugnaturem". (Whosoever desires peace prepares for war; no one provokes, nor dares to offend, those who they know know to be superior in battle.) -someone else

_____________________________________
Si vis pacem, para bellum is a Latin adage translated as, "If you seek peace, prepare for war". The source of this adage remains unknown;[1] however, it is universally believed, rightly or wrongly, to be based on a quotation from Roman military writer Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus: Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.[2] The saying is one of many from or based on his work, Epitoma rei militaris, possibly written around the year 390 AD.

There is a subtle difference in the grammar of the two statements. The first is emphatic, or vivid. It is a conditional sentence introduced by an adverbial clause with a verb in the indicative mood. Ordinarily one would expect a main verb in the indicative but the author switches to the imperative mood. The result is a peremptory "if you really desire peace, prepare for war."

The sentence from Vegetius is a hypothesis. It is a less vivid conditional sentence, in suppositional or should-would construction with an adjectival clause and both verbs in the subjunctive mood: "whoever therefore should desire peace would prepare for war."-wikipedia

There is a constant debate on this one, there is also the spelling si vis pacis para bellum and even si vis pacum parabellum. The single word parabellum I found out didnt even exist back then. I have done a bunch of research and if you look hard enough you will find someone who will want to use pacis or not like the phrase but its about 100 to 1 in favor of si vis pacum para bellum. I checked out a few latin forums where the sentence had been broken down into its parts and grammatically si vis pacum para bellum is correct although the english translation is a tiny bit rough.
 
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