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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I have a problem with my (factory) USP .45 12-rounders. I shoot USPSA where we do a lot of "emergency" reloads (i.e. drop the partial and slap another in from the belt). Sometimes when I do this, the basepad partially or completely slides off the bottom of the mag. Once, this resulted in the spring flying off to who knows where (which resulted in the purchase of some Wolff springs, which coincidentally fixed the feed problems I'd been having). The Wolff springs still exhibit this problem, so it's not a case of "the springs are too weak to hold the plate on."

I don't think I've seen this with full mags, but with four or fewer left it happens almost every time---even on the (admittedly crappy) carpet in my apartment.

Does anyone else have this problem? Would anybody care to speculate as to the cause? As I've mentioned, I have +10% springs in there, as of September of last year (so they're about five months old).

Thanks!
-- John.
 

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Yeah, I occassionally get the same thing, when dropped on dirt or concrete. I haven't had one come completely apart yet, but about 10% pop half way off.
I can't say that I understand how / why it does it. I haven't tried to solve it, since one hasn't come all apart yet. Maybe rubber bumpers would alter the "impact pulse" (if there is such a thing). ??? Good luck !!
 

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I've seen this happen with all brands of pistols at the classes I've taken. Even my robustly built P7 mag came apart once when it hit concrete.

If it happens while the magazine is in this pistol (like on a tap, rack drill) then it's called a "B-52". I'm sure you can figure out why. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah, the "exploding" mag gave the other guys in the squad a good laugh. Fortunately, they were good-natured enough to hold up the match (well, our squad anyway) and several people helped look for that spring. In the end, I decided it wasn't worth finding, as I was 90% convinced I needed to switch to Wolff anyway.

As far as "every gun does it" goes, I've never seen it happen to anyone else. Admittedly, I've only been shooting socially for about a year; usually two USPSA matches a month. Lots of Glocks, XDs, some 1911s and a whole lotta STI/SVI race guns (pretty ... want ...:-D). Only one other HK.

As for rubber pads, I've been eyeing that idea ever since it happened to me. I haven't found any pre-made, though. What do you think of just cutting some rubber sheet (say, 1/8" or 1/4") to fit the basepads, poking a hole in the center (so that you could push a stick/screwdriver/whatever in) for the disassembly? Then just glue that sucker to the existing pads ... leaving a couple untouched for carry. Just have to make sure they're under 141.25mm total length to stay legal for my division.

I guess I was hoping for an explanation like "your baseplates are worn and need to be replaced" ... something that had a quick fix. Oh, well.

-- John.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
OK, so on the subject of rubber: how about product 8461K135 at mcmaster.com? (I would link directly, but their site doesn't seem built that way.) Two inches is just shy of the full length of the extended baseplate; there's already an adhesive backing. The "hardness" of the rubber is supposedly similar to pencil erasers, which I would think is about right---soft enough to collapse some under the shock, but hopefully not so soft as to collapse all the way.

Just put a plate on there, trace, cut, enjoy?

EDIT: I forgot to mention that it's $11.03 for a thirty-six inch strip (the shortest they have) of the stuff. That would make a lot of pads!

-- John.
 

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Ive seen and heard of this happening more with the flat base plates than the extended base plates, only on the 12 round mags. It happened once to me, but only because the base plate was loose and I didnt do a good job of checking my equipment. I would not only look at the base plate to see if it has gotten warped or weak, but also look at the locking panel that holds the baseplate on (especially in the case of the flat base plates.
 
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