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I only shot a glock twice. It seems they are easy to shoot for the first time and very accurate. Yesterday, a guy next to me was double tapping a lot quicker than I could. I'm running a .40 compact, and he's on a 9, not sure which glock model. Do the glocks have faster follow up shots, or is it just me that I suck?
 

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I only shot a glock twice. It seems they are easy to shoot for the first time and very accurate. Yesterday, a guy next to me was double tapping a lot quicker than I could. I'm running a .40 compact, and he's on a 9, not sure which glock model. Do the glocks have faster follow up shots, or is it just me that I suck?
There are lots of things that could be a contributing factor. But you already named one of them. The 40cal is much more snappy than the 9mm. Also, with you not knowing which model he was shooting (if it was full size) but with you having a compact that could make a difference. Was his ported? What was his experience level versus yours? Bullet weights are also something to deal with in competition level shooting. People in comps use lighter weight bullets for reduced recoil. Lots of factors to consider but....I would say the big one is the 40 versus the 9mm in terms of time on target, and experience.
 

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Glock has a lower bore axis and shorter trigger reset, maybe that contributed...
Shorter trigger resets and whatever crazy add ons he has in there. I run a NY1 + LWD 3.5# connector in my G19 and it shoots far faster than even my LEM trigger on the HK
 

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Glock has a lower bore axis and shorter trigger reset, maybe that contributed...
I think that you've hit the nail on the head here. My USP is noticeably snappier in .40 cal than my .40 cal Glocks. The Glock trigger (once you get used to it and figure out how to use the reset) is, in my experience, quicker to manipulate than the HK trigger.
 

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Glocks? Are they still making those things?:10000000:
 

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Take it from me, owning two Glocks in 9mm and two USPs in .40, it's not the guns its the calibers involved. 9mm does make for faster more accurate follow up shots but I can really crank out rounds with my USP .40s as well.;)
 

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I think Glocks have a lighter slide also, which will make it easier to get back on target (less muzzle rise i suppose)
 

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I think Glocks have a lighter slide also, which will make it easier to get back on target (less muzzle rise i suppose)
I thought that lighter guns had more muzzle rise? Full size 1911s have MUCH less muzzle rise in .45 ACP than the Glock 21 I tried at the range. I'm also a .44 Magnum fan and have found that the lighter guns have much more muzzle rise. I had always been under the impression that Glocks were well known to have muzzle rise issues due to their lightweight construction.
 

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I thought that lighter guns had more muzzle rise? Full size 1911s have MUCH less muzzle rise in .45 ACP than the Glock 21 I tried at the range. I'm also a .44 Magnum fan and have found that the lighter guns have much more muzzle rise. I had always been under the impression that Glocks were well known to have muzzle rise issues due to their lightweight construction.
My understanding, was that the lighter the slide, the less momentum it had...

Of course this could be totally, wrong, but I remember a lot of guys say that the USP compacts had less muzzle rise than the fullsize/Expert...

The lighter the gun overall, the more muzzle rise will happen. Of course, there are a lot of things that contribute to muzzle rise, cycle time etc...
 

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Bullet weights are also something to deal with in competition level shooting. People in comps use lighter weight bullets for reduced recoil.
i was always under the impresstion that a lighter bullet had more recoil due to the higher of speed lighter bullets. am i wrong?
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I don't know which model of glock he was using, but it was not ported.
I'll give him an edge on experience - he's an assistant instructor in the class I was in. I think I'll have to bring out my P7M10 to even things out.

P.S I'm also the assumption that a lighter bullet has more recoil because of the higher pressure.
 

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^^ No, recoil is a function of total force (mass * velocity). A 230 grain bullet at 900 FPS has more force than a 115 grain bullet at 1200 FPS. Glocks have a much shorter reset on the trigger than H&K's and the low bore axis means the muzzle won't jump off target as much which translates into faster shooting. There is a reason they are so widely used in competitions.
 

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My understanding, was that the lighter the slide, the less momentum it had...

Of course this could be totally, wrong, but I remember a lot of guys say that the USP compacts had less muzzle rise than the fullsize/Expert...

The lighter the gun overall, the more muzzle rise will happen. Of course, there are a lot of things that contribute to muzzle rise, cycle time etc...
Not quite, Momentum is Mass times velocity. Now if the velocity was the same it would have more momentum, but a heavier slide also takes much more force to make it move, therefor the velocity will be much slower on a much heavier slide, The momentum would probably be a drop less in favor of the heavier slide, but at the same time momentum isn't the only thing that causes muzzle jump.
 

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First gun I shot was a loaner G21, part of armed security guard qualification where they didn't teach you how to clear malfunctions - that was the job of the instructors. 150 rounds through. 2 mechanical problems (no bang). Didn't know what they were at the time and it was explained only that I must have been holding the gun wrong to cause the problems.

Just barely accurate enough to qualify the first 50 (but it was practice, so they couldn't accept the result), just inaccurate enough not to qualify the second 50 (the real thing), and had to redo, with a barely passing score in the final 50.

Now, I went in prejudiced against Glock, and was horribly disappointed that they didn't bring the 1911 they showed off in the lecture, but I tried my best and Glock was not so accurate that it hit where I aimed.
 

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Lighter bullets do not always yield less recoil. Most competition shooters, shooting 9mm will use a 147gr bullet. While bullet mass does play a factor in recoil, more important is the powder burn rate and the amount of powder used. Lighter bullets will require more powder to get moving up to a higher velocity. Heavier bullet uses less powder. The result of using less powder is you get less of the rocket effect from the powder coming out the end of the barrel which won't propel the slide as fast.

Why are Glocks faster to shoot than HK.

1. Glock's trigger has less travel and shorter reset. It's easier to learn than HK's.
2. Low bore axis reduces muzzle flip.
3. Low slide mass, less mass in the slide, less moving of the gun on recoil.

Now compare a Glock to a P7, the P7 has even lower bore axis. The bore axis on a P7 is roughly where the guide rod is on an USP. The slide is even lighter than the Glock. The trigger is pretty much all creep which is good since you don't exactly know when the break will occur. Only downside is the short sight radius.

Oh and if you don't like Glock, Springfield XD and S&W M&P are very good also. M&P's design is basically take a Glock and fixed all the problems people have with it.
 

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"How do I get to Carnegie Hall?" "Practice, practice, practice."

;)

The same holds true for shooting accurately quickly.

Learn to shoot super accurately and the speed will come with practice. Just hammering the trigger as fast as possible does NOT guarantee worthwhile hits. This ain't Da Hood where yooz Spray & Pray dat you getz Da Homeyz.

It is not only unwise, but dangerous to shoot faster than you can hit the target.

A "hammer" is one flash sight picture, two quick presses of the trigger. With practice this is quite effective at closer ranges with shot splits down in the .15 second range easily obtained. Muscle memory plays a major part in the effectiveness of this technique, and you get that through lots and lots of practice.

A "double-tap" is two seperate and complete sight pictures with two presses of the trigger. Shot splits for this technique can range from .25 seconds apart to as long as 1 full second apart, which is an eternity.

I can't stress it enough, practice, practice, practice. Buy a reloader and reload a ton of cheap practice ammo. Get a timer, join a range, get your trigger time.
 

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The M&P looks interesting, although I hate the fact that you need a tool to take it apart. I also like the sub-compact Springfeild XD, but I HATE grip safetys so I will never buy one. Give me an "unsafe" Glock anyday over either of these competitors.

The guy was probably shooting a G19. Hands down the most popular 9mm Glock out there. The G17 is a very close second in popularity but for a carry gun the G19 fits better so it seems like they are more popular. The G26 is a good backup gun but the "baby Glock" is very distinct and you would notice right away if it was that small and I figure you would have mentioned that in your first post. If he was shooting a G34 then theres no comparing it to your USP because it's a competition model and built for better accuracy than the carry models.
 
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