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Discussion Starter #1
I went to the range for the 2nd time today with my V1 LEM P30SK. I was shooting that white box of the Federal Range ammo and about 2-4 times, the gun misfired. Now, it did this out of the 150 rounds I shot. I was doing a little rapid shooting here and some slower shooting there and every once in a while, when I shot, all I got was the click. I pulled the mag out, unloaded the gun, and continued shooting and it went as normal til I had the hickup again. Now, I'm aware of if your hand placement is off, it can cause the gun not to eject ammo and the slide to not lock back at the end of a mag but can it also cause the gun to not fire? Can it be a bad batch of the Federal ammo or is that ammo known to not be that reliable? Should I do another range trip with the same or different ammo with slower shots and access from there? Or do y'all think it can be a gun problem?
 

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Can you clarify the failures? Were there unfired rounds in the chambered or empty casings? Did you notice if the slide was in full battery during these failures? If unfired rounds, how did the primer look compared to fired rounds?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
They were unfired rounds. I thought maybe it was just the last round and I wasn't keeping the hands right but when I ejected the bullet, it was an unfired round and I still had more bullets in the mag. I didn't think to check the primer because I thought maybe it was just a error on my part but after 2 or 3 times, I figured it was some else.
 

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Is your gun new? If so, it likely isn't broken. Some say they require a break-in period; I personally clean and oil my firearms when I get them and if they are going to the range, if new, I will cycle the action a lot to help it... I did this with my P30v3 and out of ~850 rounds I haven't had a single malfunction...

It can also be your grip, if you have large hands try swapping the backstraps.. same with smaller hands.. I use medium all around except on the right I use a large to fill in my palm. Although the most common grip issue causes the slide to not lock back, if I recall correctly, because the fingers end up on top of the slide-lock/release lever.

Take some photos of how you hold it.

Edit: The way the firing pin block works is when you depress the trigger a circular springed-pin is pushed upward which releases the firing pin to allow it to move.. I haven't heard of this so I don't know if it is possible to do it quickly enough or if there are safe-guards to prevent this but: if you're squeezing the trigger and letting go quickly enough to where the hammer hasn't struct the firing pin, the mechanical stop may block the pin... For the unfired rounds in the chamber, was there a strike-mark from the firing pin or not?
 

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It can also be your grip
I am by no means a pistol expert. I do understand that a faulty 'grip' can cause, FTE, stovepipes, slide not locking after last round. But, if a round is properly seated in the chamber, I am curious just how your grip can cause the firing pin or the primer not to work ? I guess with a hammer fired gun if the web of your hand somehow came in contact with the hammer to slow it down, but that would be one strange grip...what am I missing here? I would think if the hammer fell it would have to be a bad primer, weak hammer spring or a firing pin issue, could it really be his grip?
 

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I owned 2 different XDS Guns in .45, & had light primer strikes like crazy. Had as many as 4 other shooters try them & they had NO problems. They each watched my grip & trigger discipline & could see no issues, yet it was obviously me.

I don't own P30sk so not sure how it would be for me, but Shield .45 has been flawless.

Not trying to start HK vs Whatevs (I own ~5 x 1 HK over Other), just an example that grip can play a role.

Praying for VP9c, the one gun to rule them all! Good luck in working it out.
 

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Edit: The way the firing pin block works is when you depress the trigger a circular springed-pin is pushed upward which releases the firing pin to allow it to move.. I haven't heard of this so I don't know if it is possible to do it quickly enough or if there are safe-guards to prevent this but: if you're squeezing the trigger and letting go quickly enough to where the hammer hasn't struct the firing pin, the mechanical stop may block the pin... For the unfired rounds in the chamber, was there a strike-mark from the firing pin or not?
I find this extremely unlikely unless the original poster is named Jerry Michulek. To be outracing the firing pin block would be pretty impressive. If the firing pin block has anything to do with it, I'd assume the block was damaged or defective and the trigger was not engaging it properly.

Grip can cause a lot of problems like failures to eject, stovepipes, failures to return to battery (though not common), and a failure of the slide to lock back on the last round as mentioned earlier. However, I've never heard of grip causing the gun to fail to fire. lowkeyizzy, are you sure the gun was in full battery each time this happened?

My theory is the ammo. I've read a number of threads over the years about WWB ammo not being that consistent. It doesn't surprise me since it's cheap target ammo. If the bullet on the ones that didn't fire are seated really shallowly, the overall length will be too long and the gun may not return to full battery. I don't think the hammer would drop though if it was that far out of battery.

I think a more likely scenario is that the bullets are seated too deeply and when the hammer drops, the round isn't properly headspaced. The extractor will certainly help hold the casing against the breach, but it may not be enough for a proper primer strike. If the OP has the rounds that failed to fire, then he could look at the overall length compared to other 9mm cartridges. I would expect an odd or shallow primer strike also.

Or, the primers may have just been duds. It's cheap ammo. Or the hammer spring may be defective.

I think the bottom line is that the OP should shoot the gun a lot more with a different brand of ammo and see what happens. Diagnosing the issue with this little info is going to be hard.
 

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Seems to me that it's worth a couple of bucks to run off a box of Hornady HD/CD ammo to see if this repeats. A dozen or so of 135g or 147g rounds will be a good break in for the recoil spring. Obviously if the problem repeats...it's the gun.
 

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Best test, buy several types of good factory ammo, take a basic pistol course where you shoot at least 300 rounds, then if you,still have the problem, the instructor should be able to tell you what might be happening. My VP9 didn't have any problems until I took a course. It happened because I was gripping the pistol too tightly, because we had to hold the pistol for long periods of time.

Is it possible that your grip is slowing down the slide?(Thumb rub)

JPG
 

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I experienced a couple light primer strikes in the first 50 through my P30SK. No further issues in the few hundred since then.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Sorry I haven't been able to reply to everyone's separate post, been at work but I will buy some different types of quality ammo and do another range trip and go from there.
 

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All new guns from factory (this is how my dealer orders them for me) are inspected upon pickup for scratches, malfunctions, movement of slide, etc etc.

Upon bringing home my new acquisition, completely looked over, detail stripped, cleaned like it was a present for Queen Elisabeth wearing her white gloves. Scrubbed, detail cleaned with q-tips, every nook & cranny meticulously checked and cleaned. Then the light oiling, and reassemble, numerous, slide racks, trigger pulls in both actions. Clean out the mags, wipe and apply a superficial coat of oil which is then wiped down before re assembly.

Before a range trip........(see thread about oil or grease) this sums it up.

Then when at the range, only +p ammo is used in HK pistols, as this is closest to the NATO pressure rounds. The American standard rounds are horribly under pressured, 400-600 rounds are fired at a fairly fast pace for the first hundred, gun gets damn hot, but is a good endurance test of my own.
Brought home, cleaned yet again as if the queen was receiving it. Light oil, and light bead grease on rails, then back in the case, or pistol stand in the safe. I know I'm mega anal, because t if you take care of em, they will last longer. I will never store any firearm without a proper meticulous cleaning. If you need it, and there is gunk, it may go click.........that is not good.

A clean well lubed firearm is a reliable firearm. And at the prices of these darn things, you had bet your a$$ I'm taking care of them. :)

I have yet to have any malfunction in any of my firearms.

Use +p ammo. If the factory haus mark is eagle or CIP-N it's +p rated, enjoy!

NATO too +P pressures are within a yack hair.

Fire 200-300 +P then report back.
 

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^^^ You know what ? I treat my HK's the exact same way .

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 
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