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I have always been a cocked and locked sort of person. My current carry is. P2000sk 40 DA/SA w decocker. I have always been a little Leary of the Light LEM because it was a little too light.

My questions is: Does it matter how heavy or light a "DAO" trigger is?

It seems to me that even the heaviest of DAO trigger will allow the firearm to fire it there is something caught in your holster.

I used to hate the DA part of my DA/SA USP9F, then I found that staging the trigger solves the problem. I am now considering Light LEM.

I have no problem with a safety in Home Defense, but for Concealed Carry, DAO seems to be the way to go.

JPG
 

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Any gun can fire when placed in a holster.

That's why I reholster with my thumb on the hammer, you'll feel it moving back if it's caught on something. LEM, DAO, SA/DA.
 

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Any gun can fire when placed in a holster.

That's why I reholster with my thumb on the hammer, you'll feel it moving back if it's caught on something. LEM, DAO, SA/DA.
What he said ^^^^

I only carry firearms that are well made and in proper working order; I test that periodically. I only carry in well made and well designed holsters, and I consider that a proper firearm in a proper holster is as safe as any lethal weapon can be. On the other hand I work hard to never be complacent about placing a firearm in a holster - I think that's one of the most dangerous actions we perform with our weapons on a regular basis and I always think twice and thrice when I do that - it's as much a discipline to me as keeping my finger off the trigger until I have what I wish to destroy in my sights and have determined that it's safe to fire.

Holstering any firearm is probably going to result in applying enough pressure to "pull" any trigger - whether conventional DA or LEM or light LEM - it could happen with any firearm and to anyone. Like RHINO I much prefer the HK pistols in this regard because they are hammer fired and allow you to use your thumb on the hammer to insert the firearm in the holster. If the hammer moves even the slightest bit - you know it because you feel it - and are in a heightened state of alert because you know you're doing something that is potentially dangerous - and you stop what you're doing and find out what's wrong. So it doesn't bother me if the HK is DA, LEM, light LEM or SA/DA with a safety on - I do the same thing the same way regardless.

I hope that for the rest of my life I can avoid an AD or ND.
 

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Any gun can fire when placed in a holster.

That's why I reholster with my thumb on the hammer, you'll feel it moving back if it's caught on something. LEM, DAO, SA/DA.
^^This.
As a former Glock shooter I really like the ability to cover the hammer with my thumb when holstering. Even more so when carrying IWB.
 

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Quick re-holstering may look slick at the range but is not a gunfighting skill. It's an administrative skill and if it takes two hands or checking your shirt do it. Yeah, it speeds up a training class but it's not gunfighting.

A story I recall from several years ago when a Texas CHL holder went to the aid of a policeman who had just been shot by a bad guy. The citizen drew his pistol, put two shots center of mass in the BG ("standard response"), and expertly reholstered the pistol. Bad Guy then shot him dead while he stood there empty handed. Several lessons there and his training certainly failed him.

-- Chuck
 

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I used to hate the DA part of my DA/SA USP9F, then I found that staging the trigger solves the problem.
JP,

Try and take a course with an instructor that actually knows DA technique, not just any instructor. Staging a DA is generally a bad practice in self-defense marksmanship. It should be a continuous pull. In the context of self-defense, the only people I've known to advocate staging a DA trigger are those who don't really shoot them, or don't shoot them well.

The two best instructors that come to mind are Todd L. Green and Ernest Langdon. They're pretty much the pimps of TDA pistols, but you'll have to work a little to meet their prereqs. If we lived closer, I'd be all about some lunch and range time to share some of the technique I've learned along the way.

___________________________________________________

If there's a hammer, and you're not thumbing it on re-holstering, you're wrong. Plain and simple. There is no better way to keep a loaded handgun from firing while re-holstering than physically blocking the hammer from cocking the pistol and having tactile feedback to know if the trigger is being snagged.

A light LEM is generally considered a safe firearm for carry. Although it doesn't have the weight of a TDA or DAO, it has the long travel in pull. There's a lot more margin for human error with a light LEM than there is with a typical SFA pistol. If you want to use LEM as a CCW, go for it.

No mechanical device can replace a lack of training or lack of implementing safety procedures.
 

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My questions is: Does it matter how heavy or light a "DAO" trigger is?
That question, and the corresponding answer, depends on the context.

From a legal perspective? That will vary from venue to venue.

From a mechanical safety perspective? No, there's no difference. It takes a deliberate pull of the trigger to make it move.

The real question is: What do you feel comfortable with.

I'm actually a bit bothered by the idea that you are comfortable with operating a safety (may I assume SA "cocked and locked"?), but feel compelled to change to DAO for CCW.
 

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P.S. The reason why you see so much "DAO" style of triggers in duty carry, is because it dumbs down the weapon handling skills, reducing training time for new employees. Not for any reason other than not having to teach unfamiliar people how to operate the safety lever.
 

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I used to carry Glock primarily... But I hardly ever carried with a loaded chamber. I like being able to ride the hammer on the HK's... It gives me that warm and fuzzy.
 

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There are no liability or "legal" requirements for trigger weights in DA, SA, DAO, LEM, etc. Not talking about stupid laws like the MA 10 pound minimum requirement (only applies to new pistols sold by dealers in MA). You're responsible for every round downrange regardless of the weight of your trigger pull. Intentional shot; accidental shot; negligent shot -- they're all yours.

-- Chuck
 

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There are no liability or "legal" requirements for trigger weights in DA, SA, DAO, LEM, etc. Not talking about stupid laws like the MA 10 pound minimum requirement (only applies to new pistols sold by dealers in MA). You're responsible for every round downrange regardless of the weight of your trigger pull. Intentional shot; accidental shot; negligent shot -- they're all yours.

-- Chuck
What he said!!
 

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I used to carry Glock primarily... But I hardly ever carried with a loaded chamber. I like being able to ride the hammer on the HK's... It gives me that warm and fuzzy.
Lucky you were never in a gunfight with that Glock. Glocks are designed, as are all guns to carry one in the chamber! If anyone feels uncomfortable with this, then they need more training.
 
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