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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Given the current ammo situation I have decided to start loading for my HK 91. Brass seems to be a bit scarce also and the only reasonably priced stuff I can find is Winchester. I have heard though that it is thinner than military brass and I am concerned at to whether it will stand up to the rigors of a flutted chamber weapon like the 91. I doubt that I will try to reload it more than once and as long as it stands up to a first time firing I will be happy. Anybody out there used commercial Wichester brass to load for there 91? Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Thanks !

Dean
 

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The anti-reloading reputation of the HK91/G3 is mostly based on hearsay and "opinions" of people who have never tried it but "know" all brass automatically self-destructs if you bring it within ten feet of a roller lock gun, etc. blah blah ad nauseam

According to my personal experience the same brass can be used several times in a G3 and it doesn't appear to suffer in any unusual degree at least due to the fluting. The black stripes are purely cosmetic. The flutes do not "cut" into the casing or anything like that. If anything, quite the opposite - they make sure the case won't stick in the chamber as they allow the gases between the chamber wall and the case.
Without a buffer it will get dinged pretty bad but that doesn't mean it won't straighten out while resizing. With a buffer you get a single, wider but shallower ding instead of the two sharp dings.

I've never had a brass failure with reloaded ammo in my G3, but several times my FAL has pulled a rim off a case completely or partially.

I have also used the same brass both in the G3 and FAL without any ill effects.

AFAIK Winchester brass should be quite decent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info Finn. I have never actually had a brass failure with a G3/HK91 nor do I know anyone who has. Just trying to be careful. I do know of one person who had a Sig PE 57 explode on him while using reloaded ammo.A very expensive and dangerous occurence. The Sig of course uses the same delayed roller blow back system as the G3 and also has a fluted chamber. The Sig from what I understand was engineered around the GP 11 Swiss military round and the general feeling among the community of people who own them is that sticking with GP 11 is the prudent thing to do.

Dean
 

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The anti-reloading reputation of the HK91/G3 is mostly based on hearsay and "opinions" of people who have never tried it but "know" all brass automatically self-destructs if you bring it within ten feet of a roller lock gun, etc. blah blah ad nauseam

According to my personal experience the same brass can be used several times in a G3 and it doesn't appear to suffer in any unusual degree at least due to the fluting. The black stripes are purely cosmetic. The flutes do not "cut" into the casing or anything like that. If anything, quite the opposite - they make sure the case won't stick in the chamber as they allow the gases between the chamber wall and the case.
Without a buffer it will get dinged pretty bad but that doesn't mean it won't straighten out while resizing. With a buffer you get a single, wider but shallower ding instead of the two sharp dings.

I've never had a brass failure with reloaded ammo in my G3, but several times my FAL has pulled a rim off a case completely or partially.

I have also used the same brass both in the G3 and FAL without any ill effects.

AFAIK Winchester brass should be quite decent.
Will the resizer remove dings like these? And... does the nick in the rim cause any problem? -- I'd like to try reloading, I have a progressive press, but just have never bought the .308 dies.

 

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Will the resizer remove dings like these? And... does the nick in the rim cause any problem?
The brass looks fairly typical to me, I would use it.
If it will go through the resizing die, it will generally straighten out enough to be reusable.
The dings may not disappear altogether - until for a moment in the chamber while fired, before it's ejected and dinged again - but in my experience they straighten out pretty well and slight cosmetic imperfections are not a practical issue.

I haven't noticed any problems due to the (normal) extractor marks on the rim. BTW they are a pretty good gauge for how hot the loads are. With hot loads the rims will start to look pretty scary, I have had some experimental hunting loads after which I did not reuse the case any more...

The port buffer is nice for reloaders, the cases won't look as bad and they will only fly to the next town over, not the next county.
 

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That ding seems drastic when talking about reloading. I have reloaded the single dinged cases. I evaluate every piece after the resize. It bothered me enough in the beginning that I reloaded them and put them in the plinking stack. I then shot them through my bolt action to fire-forge them back to true round chamber size. I get tons of Federal Gold Medal Match Brass from work and it killed me seeing the brass get dinged. They chamber forge perfectly. The dings cause accuracy differences at longer ranges. I don't mind due to only utilizing this platform as a 200-300 yard battle rifle. I have noticed that a dinged case can cause a feed problem and if the case gets caught just right it can bend or crush the case under the heavy recoil impulse as it tries to chamber. I prefer form and function. Jams in training or practice are great for training but I get enough of those from factory ammo. Good luck. I hope that was helpful. Its just an opinion and we all know what those are worth.
 

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That ding seems drastic when talking about reloading. I have reloaded the single dinged cases. I evaluate every piece after the resize. It bothered me enough in the beginning that I reloaded them and put them in the plinking stack. I then shot them through my bolt action to fire-forge them back to true round chamber size. I get tons of Federal Gold Medal Match Brass from work and it killed me seeing the brass get dinged. They chamber forge perfectly. The dings cause accuracy differences at longer ranges. I don't mind due to only utilizing this platform as a 200-300 yard battle rifle. I have noticed that a dinged case can cause a feed problem and if the case gets caught just right it can bend or crush the case under the heavy recoil impulse as it tries to chamber. I prefer form and function. Jams in training or practice are great for training but I get enough of those from factory ammo. Good luck. I hope that was helpful. Its just an opinion and we all know what those are worth.
have not reloaded my 911 in a long time as surplus was available until recently but the small nicks in the case mouth I seem to remember were taken off by the Dillon case trimmer I also bought a long time ago. bought everything I needed powder(IMR 4895?)military brass and commercial brass and sierra match king bullets. then put it away for more than 10 years now I am getting ready to shoot some more in the near future. any reason this stuff should go bad? reloaded rounds? If I remember this stuff was really accurate with the Williams set trigger I had done. less than 1" if I remember. the other thing Brian at wts told me was that the hk did not like sandbags and was made to fire offhand with the sling as a tensioner and was most accurate sitting with this hold. maybe a lie but he said all 91's shot this way after his trigger polishing would shoot 1 inch or less groups with good ammo. conversation from 91 or so but that is what I remember him saying. kinda goes with the idea that this is a battle rifle and made to use this way not as a target rifle. stands to reason. am I crazy or remembering wrong? my personal reloads in the wts trigger 911 would shoot very tight groups. maybe my memory is wrong but does 44 grains of 4895 sound right. still have some of the reloads here may have to try out my new fero z24 and see if they match the bdc. thanks for looking at a very amateur's post. bob
 

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Yes, you can get a sweet load of 4895 and either 168 or 155 grain bullets. There is data in loading manuals for you to compare to.

I have actually used mine for prairie doggin' using these components. What a hoot.
 

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prarie dogging

Yes, you can get a sweet load of 4895 and either 168 or 155 grain bullets. There is data in loading manuals for you to compare to.

I have actually used mine for prairie doggin' using these components. What a hoot.
what kind of range/accuracy did you get? I thought I was crazy when I saw how the setup shot. I also picked up one of those old barrel tensioners that replace the flash hider from a show a while ago. supposed to tighten groups even more. can this setup shoot 2-300 yards accurately? what power scope would work? thanks bob
 

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I'm not talking about the case mouth. The case body will still have deformity after the resize, which can cause failure to feed.
 

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what kind of range/accuracy did you get? I thought I was crazy when I saw how the setup shot. I also picked up one of those old barrel tensioners that replace the flash hider from a show a while ago. supposed to tighten groups even more. can this setup shoot 2-300 yards accurately? what power scope would work? thanks bob
can a 91 with the standard twist stabilize a 110 grain sierra bullet? bob
 

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what kind of range/accuracy did you get? I thought I was crazy when I saw how the setup shot. I also picked up one of those old barrel tensioners that replace the flash hider from a show a while ago. supposed to tighten groups even more. can this setup shoot 2-300 yards accurately? what power scope would work? thanks bob
The accuracy was hindered mostly by my abilities and the magnification of the scope, combined with the low position from the light bipod. However, in front of witnesses, I shot one on the run at about 425 yards. The shot felt good on its way out the tube, and voila. Got him!

Other than that I connected maybe 1 out of 8 times.

It is fun.

Next is a JPRifles tank brake for the recoil reduction.
 

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recoil eliminator

The accuracy was hindered mostly by my abilities and the magnification of the scope, combined with the low position from the light bipod. However, in front of witnesses, I shot one on the run at about 425 yards. The shot felt good on its way out the tube, and voila. Got him!

Other than that I connected maybe 1 out of 8 times.

It is fun.

Next is a JPRifles tank brake for the recoil reduction.
how does that attach to the rifle? bob
 

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can a 91 with the standard twist stabilize a 110 grain sierra bullet? bob
Before I got serious about coyote hunting 25 years ago I loaded both the Sierra 110 HP and 125 gr spitzer with very good results. I never loaded any single round more than a few times because I was worried about set back.
I used H4895 and small base dies.
My brass never had multiple dents like the photo posted and the ones I did have were not a problem.
 

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can a 91 with the standard twist stabilize a 110 grain sierra bullet? bob
how does that attach to the rifle? bob
Sorry I missed your questions.

Yes. It will stabilize the 110's just fine. I used some Hornady 110 spire point soft nose bullets, and it actually cycled ok too with the same load of 4895 I use with my 155 grain bullets.

The JPRifles dot com muzzle brake threads on to the barrel in place of the flash hider. I have one of their Cooley brakes on mine presently, which sort of butted up against the shoulder on the barrel (PTR 91), and held in place with Red Loctite. The Cooley is pretty good, but it is designed for the 3 gun game "Tactical Division," and it gives up some effectiveness in order to fit within the rules, and I don't think I'll be shooting that game again. So I guess I'll go for the gusto and get the tank brake.

I suspect that the tank brake will need shimming or the like to get it up real snug, and then something to pin it in place. I'll take it to my gunsmith for that work. I'll let you guys know what I learn as I learn it.

Here is a photo of the Cooley when it was new.

 
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