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Discussion Starter #1
Alright folks, I'm kind of curious on how you guys that use Militec apply it. I've read stories from using hair dryers, heat guns, baking it in the oven to apply and forget it. So with that said, how do you guys apply Militec to your beloved HKs?
 

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This time o year i just wipe it on, really keeps my AR and 93 bolts clean= just wipe the soot off.

In the summer, i put a generous coating on and leave it sit in the sun on a teel plate,,, it gets hot enough for me.
 

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There are two ways I use. First is the hair dryer method, where I coat the entire inside of the slide, the frame (except for the grip) and the barrel with a fair portion and then blast away with hot air. This I do if I'm not going to immediately shoot the gun. The second method I use if I'm going to shoot right away is to put a generous amount on and shoot till the gun is hot...real hot. Some high wear areas may not get up to temperature this way I think, so it isn't my prefered method.
 

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For the first time I drench the entire gun, dissembled, into the oven at the lowest temp... put it in, turn off the oven and wait till its cool (several hours)... maybe even cook it for an hour (170 the lowest temp?) and re-oil then back in and turn off. After that I just final coat it after cleaning....

This could well be only a ceremonial process that does nothing for the gun, but I enjoy it and I think the gun likes it.

Oh, when I had my Tac sonic cleaned, I was VERY disappointed as it went from black to gray. I did the above process and the black came back and has stayed.

PS some people say a gun needs to be wet in oil to run well... not my Tac, just a light oiling and wipe off and it runs fine. Hope this helps
 
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I doubt that Militec's lubricity characteristics are equal to those of Mobil 1. Militec was "invented" as a crankcase additive. Didn't work out well in the sales dept., so somebody got the bright idea of selling it as a firearms specialty lube in small bottles for a lot of $$$$.
 

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militec

I agree, I think its mostly a gimmick to get you to buy a high price oil/grease/lube etc. As you state how could any product be better than a synthetic motor oil that lubricates engine parts at high temperature for literally hour after hour without breaking down? I don't think a firearm will ever endure such abuse with the exception of sustained full auto fire ie; Saw, M60, M250 cal., mini/gatling guns etc. Just look at the last the gatling gun, you can't possibly think lubricants adhere to that metal as it rips through ammo @6000rpm? I think for the most part people like the ritual of cleaning, oiling, maintenance of firearms as if it really matters for most applications. Rem-oil, CLP, militec, mobil 1, other than the process of clean, apply, clean, repeat, I don't see any appreciable difference.
 

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I think for the most part people like the ritual of cleaning, oiling, maintenance of firearms as if it really matters for most applications.

Maybe.
:79:

"I love the smell of militec in the morning.
It smells like.......viscosity."
 

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I have been speculating on this for some time.
The original synthetic oil was developed by Al Amatuzio, and his company was AmsOil. http://www.amsoil.com/ He had the patent on it but that patent ran out more than a decade ago, and that is when Mobil1 and all the other automotive oil brands of synthetic came out. All the modern automotive synthetics are Amatuzio's synthetic. That much I know for certain.
Now, I'm guessing on this next part, but I'm thinking that Militec (which I use) and all the others are all the same synthetic that Amatuzio developed. That oil was (and is still) available in different viscosities, from a range of engine oils, to heavier gear lube, to light weight oil similar to WD40 they called MP, or Metal Protector.
All the gun oils, available now since there is no patent restriction, I'm guessing again, are the same basic stock, with perhaps a little bit of additives, but I'm wondering if the basic oil isn't Amatuzio's synthetic. It would be interesting if someone was in the industry and really knew the story and could tell us.
Buy the way, I used AmsOil MP on 2 very old long guns that were starting to show a little rust on the outside of the barrels. Just a light wipe of MP on the outside of the barrel and they not only cleaned up nicely, but all rust has stopped and they look great.
And no, I'm not a dealer so that is not an add.

One more thing, if Militec is the synthetic that Amatuzio made, then heating it would only serve to get rid of additives, not the base synthetic, since the synthetic can take very high temps, and your polymer frame would not do well at those kind of temps. Furthermore, Amatuzio's synthetic was very good at penetrating not only the surfaces between metal parts, but actually gets into the pores of the metal, then stays there due to a small electromagnetic charge.
 

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I have been speculating on this for some time.
The original synthetic oil was developed by Al Amatuzio, and his company was AmsOil. http://www.amsoil.com/ He had the patent on it but that patent ran out more than a decade ago, and that is when Mobil1 and all the other automotive oil brands of synthetic came out. All the modern automotive synthetics are Amatuzio's synthetic. That much I know for certain.
Now, I'm guessing on this next part, but I'm thinking that Militec (which I use) and all the others are all the same synthetic that Amatuzio developed. That oil was (and is still) available in different viscosities, from a range of engine oils, to heavier gear lube, to light weight oil similar to WD40 they called MP, or Metal Protector.
All the gun oils, available now since there is no patent restriction, I'm guessing again, are the same basic stock, with perhaps a little bit of additives, but I'm wondering if the basic oil isn't Amatuzio's synthetic. It would be interesting if someone was in the industry and really knew the story and could tell us.
Buy the way, I used AmsOil MP on 2 very old long guns that were starting to show a little rust on the outside of the barrels. Just a light wipe of MP on the outside of the barrel and they not only cleaned up nicely, but all rust has stopped and they look great.
And no, I'm not a dealer so that is not an add.

One more thing, if Militec is the synthetic that Amatuzio made, then heating it would only serve to get rid of additives, not the base synthetic, since the synthetic can take very high temps, and your polymer frame would not do well at those kind of temps. Furthermore, Amatuzio's synthetic was very good at penetrating not only the surfaces between metal parts, but actually gets into the pores of the metal, then stays there due to a small electromagnetic charge.
Great post -- I, for one, would certainly like to know just what we're buying as well...

FWIW, I like the Militec grease -- don't use their oil, prefer Boeing's T9 for my oil uses...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
This topic has educated me on, and I appreciate it. However, being the typical OCD person that I am, I'd be nice if anyone can provide empirical data to support their thoughts (e.g. links)...TIA
 

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from Militec website...

FIREARMS APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS: SELF-LUBRICATION
CHARACTERISTICS: MILITEC-1 Synthetic Metal Conditioner has the unique ability to create a complex, molecular compound within the surface of heated gunmetal. This causes MILITEC-1 to become part of the metal, not merely a temporary coating or a boundary film. There are two main characteristics of this safe new compound. First, it seals and conditions the metal by stiffening (not hardening) the metal surface. Second, it makes the gunmetal self-lubricating under all environmental conditions.

SELF-LUBRICATION: After a complete application, a MILITEC-1 conditioned firearm is self-lubricating. Self-lubrication gives the firearm's gunmetal the dry lubricity that is required for sustained fire under all environmental conditions. If exposure to dust, sand, or extreme cold is a concern, all excess MILITEC-1 must be wiped away, leaving the firearm's surface metal clean, dry, and constantly lubricated. Please note: Complete corrosion protection and self-lubrication is attained only after both Step One and Step Two (below) are completed.

PREPARATION: To take full advantage of MILITEC-1's unique properties, start with a clean firearm. Although MILITEC-1 contains a mild detergent that will help with subsequent cleaning, there are no solvents or other hazardous materials in MILITEC-1, so it cannot remove old caked-on fouling and build-up from other lubes. Thus, if a firearm is dirty, you must clean it with a solvent before you proceed. Normal fieldstrip cleaning should be perfectly adequate. If possible, remove the handgrips, clean and prepare.

INITIAL TREATMENT: Applying MILITEC-1 to a firearm for the first time is a two-step process: (1) Application and (2) Firing.

STEP ONE: APPLICATION. Now that the firearm is clean and dry, apply a light film of MILITEC-1 to all surfaces, including the bore. Burnish/polish MILITEC-1 into exterior surfaces by rubbing rapidly using a cloth lightly dampened with MILITEC-1. Sparingly apply drops into the action, concentrating on springs, moving parts and metal-to-metal contact areas. If your firearm has a magazine, be sure to apply MILITEC-1 both inside and out. Leave a very light film of MILITEC-1 on all surfaces during reassembly. Now proceed to Step Two.

STEP TWO: FIRING. Once you fire your weapon enough times to reach operating temperatures, the heat and friction will activate MILITEC-1, strengthening the bonding process that was started in Step One. While firing, MILITEC-1 creates a self-lubricating, water-repelling, dry compound within the gunmetal.

Additional Application Instructions: If Step Two is not immediately possible, consider applying low heat to the firearm to facilitate the bonding process until you can perform Step Two. In field conditions, place your lubed firearm in the sun underneath black plastic or a similar ventilated heat source for at least two hours. Alternatively, you may use a heat gun, hairdryer, burnishing or polishing tool to heat the gunmetal. In heat controlled environments, do not exceed 150° F (65° C). In all applications that require heat to condition the firearm, always insure proper ventilation and wear protective clothing. Please consult our MSDS for additional information.

ULTIMATE PROTECTION: To maximize the effects of MILITEC-1, repeat Step One and Step Two while the firearm is still hot from the first firing session. MILITEC-1's impregnated molecular bond intensifies during the next 2-3 applications on hot gunmetal. MILITEC-1 has now become a physical part of the gunmetal.

SUBSEQUENT APPLICATIONS: It is important to continue using MILITEC-1 to lubricate your firearm throughout its normal service life. Consistent use of MILITEC-1 will maintain the self-lubricating effect, maximize corrosion protection, and minimize wear on all friction surfaces. Fouling, deposits and metallic debris do not adhere as easily to gunmetal surfaces conditioned with MILITEC-1. Use a safe, inexpensive cleaner or solvent to detail the firearm, if necessary. For maximum corrosion protection, and especially if long-term storage is anticipated, leave a very light film of MILITEC-1 on all surfaces, after both steps or field application procedures are completed.

APPLICABILITY: MILITEC-1 is recommended for all pistols, shotguns, rifles, automatic weapons, tank guns and artillery of all calibers and sizes. Note: MILITEC-1 will alleviate jamming due to tight tolerances.
 

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Not all synthetic oils are equal.

AMSoil is good stuff, however if I were going to use a motor oil on my guns I'd probly use Motul.

AMSoil is a PAO based oil with Esters added to it.

Motul's 8100 and 300v line's are Ester based with additional Esters added.

Ester based oils 'soak' into the metal and stay there. There's a somewhat famous test done by BMW where they dipped crankshafts into an oil bath and then left them outside in the elements for 6 months. Only Motul showed no rust. I dont believe AMSoil was in the test, so you cant compare them, but regardless Ester based oils are the best available right now.

The 4-ball wear test is probly the most similar to replicating what happens when you fire a gun.

Something to keep in mind for those that like to use motor oil to lube their guns.

FWIW, I liked Militec as a lube, but not as a corrosion preventer. I've been using Weapon Sheild and so far it's the best I've used. Militec with Break-Free worked well as a combo, but it's just easier and cheaper to use one product.
 

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http://www.synthetic-motor-oil-change-and-filters.com/motorcycle-oil/motorcycle-oil-10w40.php

found this page. It's the only one I can find that compairs amsoil and motul. It's a compairison of motorcycle oils. Very close results, identical on 4 ball test.
What is a PAO?
Amsoil makes a blended oil but they also make pure synthetic and as I understand it, the pure synthetic is an ester synthetic.
has anyone used one of their products on their HK?
I have only used their MP and that only on an old gun that was starting to show rust. That stoped the rust entirely. (I have also treated other iron and steal items with outstanding rust stopping results)
anyway, it would be interesting to know if Militec starts with one of these synthetics as it's base stock, or maybe is just repackaging.
 

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Polyalphaolefin (PAO) = API (American Petroleum Institute) Group IV base oil

Synthetic esters, etc = API Group V base oils (non-PAO synthetics, including diesters, polyolesters, alklylated napthlenes, alkyklated benzenes, etc.)

Hydrocracked/Hydroisomerized = API Group III base oils. Chevron, Mobil, and other petrochemical companies developed processes involving catalytic conversion of feed stocks under pressure in the presence of hydrogen into high quality mineral lubricating oil. In 2005 production of GTL (Gas-to-liquid) Group III base stocks began. The best of these perform much like polyalphaolefin. Group III base stocks are considered synthetic motor oil in North America

Ester based oil's are group V base oils.

Group IV oils are very good, and with group V additives, can get extremely close to group V oils.

More or less, to keep it simple, if you use motor oil to lube your gun, find a group IV or group V oil.

Here's a test comparing motorcycle oils. Some of the tests are irrelevant when it comes to gun lubrication and corrosion protection, but if you think about how a gun works, the tests you should pay attention to will stand out.

http://www.amsoil.com/lit/g2156.pdf
 

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Use Weapon Shield now, its proven superior to Miltec and the others tried in the past - very happy with its performance. I dont see a need to use synthetic motor oils for weapons.
 

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Interesting info. Looks like Amsoil is the best for wear and tear and rust prevention. I may start using this stuff on one of my guns and see how it runs.
 

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Use Weapon Shield now, its proven superior to Miltec and the others tried in the past - very happy with its performance. I dont see a need to use synthetic motor oils for weapons.
+1, but since it was brought up, I figured I'd share my thoughts on oils.

Have you tried the other Steel Shield products yet?

I got a tub of Lithi-Shield when I placed my last order, and have been using it on the rails of my alloy/steel framed pistols. So far it seems to be working great and it's nice to have something a little thicker. The Weapon Shield sticks to it really well too. Run some Lithi-Shield on it, and then put drops of Weapon Shield on top. It's pretty cheap, you should give it a try sometime, and let me know what you think.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Upon you guys advice, I placed an order for Weapon Shield. The product looks interesting, and it is cheap enough to at least try. I swear I'm collecting more solvents, lubes and oils than I know what to do with?!?
 

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I have a USPc .40 which has had the weapons shield treatment with 2000+ rounds through it (since application) and my USP .45 with Militec process with nearly 3000 rounds through it just to test these products;

One does not seem any better than the other.....

So I'm sticking with the more cost effective solution..
 

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I have a USPc .40 which has had the weapons shield treatment with 2000+ rounds through it (since application) and my USP .45 with Militec process with nearly 3000 rounds through it just to test these products;

One does not seem any better than the other.....

So I'm sticking with the more cost effective solution..
Havacgar, I think your observation may be in fact very realistic. I think most applications are equal in performance; it might come down to the costs associated. I finally got my package of weaponshield, and the product looks pretty reasonable. I am looking forward to trying both products.
 
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