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Discussion Starter #1
Good old 10 day waiting period....

Bought a new HK 9mm USPf last week at Turners. I'm very excited to get the gun, it'll be my first. To pass the time, I've ordered extra mag's, a speed loader, ammo, and a rail adapter for a tac light (GG&G). Basically, just trying to get over this horrible waiting period (I'm really bad with patience)....

Anyways, any suggestions on any other accessories? Using the gun mainly for range and home protection. I'm planning on classes at my local gun range (On Target in Laguna Niguel).

Thanks, and I'm excited to be a new member of the HK world!

Zach
Mission Viejo, CA
 

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I'm in the same boat with you

I know how it feels.

You know what I do?

1. I stare at the pictures, taken from various angles.

2. print them out, and stare at them when you are not on the computer.

3. go to www.youtube.com and watch the USP shooting videos. There are plenty of them.

This will help you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
hehehehe

check, check and check. Did #3 just about 10 minutes ago....

I'll pop by Turner's today and buy more crap that I don't need. That should help...LOL
 

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I would look into getting a holster, possibly a range bag, hearing protection, eye protection, etc. Sky's the limit! Welcome aboard!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks!

Got eyes and ears and a bag, I think you have to be approved to use a holster at On Target...perhaps I'm wrong though.

Otherwise, I think that I've got a good cache of starting items, just trying to figure out which Tac light to go with and if I should do a light only or light/laser combo.

There is a TON of great information here, thanks everyone. I've been on the site non stop since purchasing the gun last week.

Zach
 

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Zach, I like the Streamlight TLR -1 for just the light or TLR-2 for light/laser. The Surefire X200B and new X300 are nice, but pricy and no laser options. Stick with LED lights. The light is more even and brighter in illumination and there is less tendency of bulb burn out. Aside from shooting the gun, the fun part is shopping for accessories! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good stuff....and yes, the accessories are a blast :)

question, are lasers really "useful" or is it just better to stick with a light only...
 

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On top of what everyone else mentioned to purchase for your USP stock up on as much ammo as you can (the most important thing) :).

Congrats on getting your new HK. Post up some pics once you pick her up.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Will do for sure...

Spend a bunch of time researching the best places to get ammo, found that Wal Mart was the best for WWB, which I've heard it great for simple range time.
 

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If there is a ****'s Sporting Goods out by where you are, check them for ammo. They have some of the cheapest prices I've seen on regular ball ammo (for target practice), even better than Walmart and some online vendors!

I find the laser to be a novelty. But if your gun is for home defense, the visual impact of a laser dot can make an intruder poopoo in his pants and you might not have to fire a shot at all, LOL :D
 

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congrats, nice choice for your first gun!
I'd second the advice to get ammo and practice.

If you want to get some real quality training, check out Bruce Gray's classes. He's doing a class in San Diego this weekend, and might be back down in that area soon.
http://sigforum.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/451105858/m/292102569

In addition to training classes, try some competitions also! IPSC, IDPA, speed steel, bowling pins etc. It's great fun.
 

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By the way, I was going to say it's a brilliant choice you made with the caliber.

I have shot USPf 9mm and USPf 40 S&W, but it felt like USP with a 9mm was nearly "perfect".

I don't remember the ammo I used (but it was a "regular" 9mm), but the recoil was like shooting a .380 ACP, and the accuracy was excellent.

I shot the 9mm USP with a double tap, tripe tab, emptying the mag without a pause, and because of it's plastic frame and dual recoil spring, the entire shooting was very comfortable (the recoil was absorbed to the plastic frame very smoothly). Most of all, I loved the way the gun gave the least stress to the shooter when firing.

But on the other hand, with my .40 S&W experiences with USP was not that good. The recoil was somewhat "weird" (it's hard to describe, but it was not a crisp or soft ), the accuracy was not good, and the stress delivered to the shooter was not comfortable. Often times I had to change the way I grip the pistol, because the vibration while firing was pretty vigorus.

Most of all, the feeling when firing the gun was not "clean". I think they should have designed the gun little bit more bigger and little more suitable for acommodating the .40 S&W ammo.

The USP compact in .40 was even worse. The accuracy was terrible, the recoil felt "unstable" (absolutelly uncomfortable, too powerful, and you can feel the plastic frame still vibrating and slide boucing a little, a half second after the firing) , and the stress to the shooter was unacceptable.

It was very hard for me to hold the gun and fire without re-positoning my gripping hand often. Simply cutting the size small yielded this result.

Anyway, once again, choosing the 9mm USPf is a brilliant choice.

Congrats, and have fun with your new gun.

If you are going to use it for the home defense, I highly recommend 9mm Federal JHP with %10 more powerful ammo than the regular 9mm. It's very accurate ammo, the recoil is still low enough while the power is pretty good.

And most of all, the Jacket Hollow Point (JHP) ammo will cause "tramatic" wounds to the living target because it will tear out the tissue of the target as the bullet changes it's shape at the moment of the impact.

And, for my last advice, this is just my opinion. If you are really serious about the home protection, what I would do is chamber load the gun with 8~9 rounds in the mag ( since you live in California, the new mags are limited to accept only 10 shots, unless you buy the pre-ban mags).

Keep the gun in the very top drawer (at your lower abdoment level), with safety off, and keeping the trigger in the double action mode. Place only the gun (with a couple of more extra loaded mags), but nothing else, so you can pick up the gun quickly. If you are right handed, place the gun left side facing the floor.

This is for the situation when some crooks break into your house, yet they do that undetected.

Unlike Glock, the USP has traditional double actioin trigger, so it's safe to do that. Also USP has interal firing pin block saftey, so unless YOU pull the trigger or heat the gun to the extreme level, it won't self-fire (it's called "cook-off").


And, remember; don't ever let anyone uneducated about the gun go near to your gun!

Welcome aboard, and have fun with your "nearly perfect" weapon!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Man, that's one hell of a post, thank you a TON for the wonderful advice....:)

I went with the 9mm because, after hearing a bunch of local shop owners tell me that .45 was the only way to go because 9mm was not "powerful enough to stop an intruder", and than comparing prices of everything having to do with .45 vs. 9mm, I thought it was more of a sales pitch than anything. Personally, I know that living in a gated community I'll probably never pull the gun for home use, meaning that most all of the time will be range time. The 9mm is significantly less expensive across the board to learn on, and if someone one day is stupid enough to break into my house, I doubt that they will be able to walk through 10 rounds of 9mm.

My thinking is this: It's more cost effective to learn how to be a solid shot with a 9mm. I can use the extra money in cost difference between 9mm and .45 to take classes and get in range time so that if a situation occurs, I won't NEED the .45 because I'll be a solid shot with a 9mm.

Also, I just ordered a TLR-2 for the gun. Again, my thinking here was that if a bad guy walks into my house, a laser on his chest and a flashlight in his face should be enough to make him either lay down or run away. A shot is probably the last thing I'd do in that situation (thanks lawyers), but knowing that I have the last line of defense if something one day occurs is key to me.

Having three young kids in the house (2.5 year old boy and twin 1 year old girls), though, it becomes tough to leave the gun in a drawer at night. I'd be more likely to just leave the safe unlocked as it's in close proximity to my bed. Any thoughts on this? Also, I KNOW (at this point at least) the wife would not be comfortable with a loaded and chambered gun in the night stand ;)

I'm most excited to actually LEARN how to be a good shooter with the gun. I'm a noob and I know it, so I'm going to take the time to take classes (planning on private lessons) and get good with the gun. In my mind, that's the most important and responsible thing that I can do right now.

Thanks guys, again, this is an amazing source of information.
 

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Excellent suggestion!

Im planning on doing some basic work at On Target, hopefully private lessons. My long term goal would be to run some classes here:

http://www.internationaltactical.com/index.asp

The school looks top notch!

Has anyone attended? How would it compare to the Gray school?

Zach
ITTS is a good school, very well regarded. I would go in a heartbeat.

Bruce Gray is a well-known competitor and gunsmith. He does work on HKs, 1911s, Sigs, and others. His classes are great, a friend of mine took one in Seattle earlier this year and raved about it. He has traveling classes and you can get information at sigforum.com, where he hangs out most of the time.

If you go to Vegas a lot, Front Sight is a well-regarded training facility also.

Definitely go to a class sooner rather than later. The more you practice on your own without a firm foundation, the more you will need to unlearn.

good luck!
 

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Man, that's one hell of a post, thank you a TON for the wonderful advice....:)

I went with the 9mm because, after hearing a bunch of local shop owners tell me that .45 was the only way to go because 9mm was not "powerful enough to stop an intruder", and than comparing prices of everything having to do with .45 vs. 9mm, I thought it was more of a sales pitch than anything. Personally, I know that living in a gated community I'll probably never pull the gun for home use, meaning that most all of the time will be range time. The 9mm is significantly less expensive across the board to learn on, and if someone one day is stupid enough to break into my house, I doubt that they will be able to walk through 10 rounds of 9mm.

My thinking is this: It's more cost effective to learn how to be a solid shot with a 9mm. I can use the extra money in cost difference between 9mm and .45 to take classes and get in range time so that if a situation occurs, I won't NEED the .45 because I'll be a solid shot with a 9mm.

With 2~3 rounds of 9mm JHP with good shot placement will stop most of an assailant. 9mm is still good. You don't have to go absolutelly for the .45. The dealers you spoke can be fit into one of those debators always appear in the forum, always talking about what's the perfect caliber for a pistol.

LAPD (Los Angeles Police Dpt.), NYPD (New York Poice Dpt.) and U.S. Army use 9mm. Get it?

And you said you are going for the training. This will maximize your ability to protect yourself. Ask your instructor, if proper use of 9mm is good. I am certain he will agree with you.

.45 would be a good choice, because it has a fantastic stopping power. Any big guy with a thick winter jacket would get knocked down by a single shot in the chest.

But if you are a beginner in firearms, then yes, 9mm is still fine. It all depends on the person, but at first, shooting .45 will give the shooter big stress, because of the powerful recoil (although USP 45 is known to be one of the most comfortable .45 caliber pistols to shoot.).

And, I honestly think .45 is little bit out of practicality, in real shooting situation. Since its recoil is powerful, it's difficult to shoot the gun in double tap (shooting two rounds at one instance) or multiple shots, and many of the gun fights are not finished with a few rounds being fired.

Speak to any experiences law enforcement officers or soldiers who have had a pistol fire fight, and they'll tell it's the both side - you and your enemy- shooting plenty of rounds, creating a hale of bullets flying to each other, while both sides moving around and hiding behind a cover. It's not like the enemy is standing in open view and say "cheese." Not like regular shooting range experiences.

Unless you have been practicing with firing the .45 for many years, it may be uncomfortable to use when engaging in a fire fight.

Most important thing of all, I was told, is the shot placement. Try to hit the vital organs of the (human) target, like head, heart, rib+lung, etc. In my opinion, when dealing with a mere robber (who is not willing to die in fighting), taking the eye shot is the best; although it will be extremely hard to do that.

If you can successfully do the eye shot, you are not only destroying his eye and make him jump around and scream instantly, but the bullet -from 9mm to up- will continue traveling into the head, so effectively damaging the brain and stop the assailant for good.

And just like you said, with 10 shot of 9mm would take a life away.

One of the good things about the USPf 9mm is, you can shoot more powerful 9mm rounds than the average guns like Beretta M92FS can accept. HK designed the gun to comsume powerful ammutions, so you can use 9mm +p in your USPf (ask about this to your ammo salesman).

And lastly, occationally I heard some bad stories about USP 45, as they jam or shoot with poor accuracy if fired in fast sequence. I think it has to do with the flexibility of the USP's plastic frame design (Glock's plastic frame design is very different from the USP, and that's why Glock never jams) and dual-recoil spring. In other words, I don't recommend USPf in large calibers above 9mm.

Good thing you are living in rich neighborhood. And you have kids... then you can be relaxed, and I think you don't have to chamber load the gun with safety off, as I recommended earlier.

By the way, how many days left 'till you get the gun?

I hope this post keeps you staying excited (I know how you feel!).
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Three days and counting....Monday at 1:10 pm is my exact pick-up time.

I've already got range time lined up, and I talked to an instructor yesterday. I should be doing the private lesson thing within 2 weeks. As I told him, I want to develop GOOD habits and learn correctly.

I'm already thinking of focusing on getting ready for a CCW some time in the future and looking at some of the compact issuing that HK has :)_

Z
 

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Discussion Starter #18
LOVING IT?

put about 200 round through it the first day, and I'm finally back from vacation so I'm back on the range today :)

EDIT: HOW DO I POST PICS?
 
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You have to upload them to photobucket, and then click the link at photobucket for forums, then come here and paste the link in your new post. Its easier than it sounds I promise LOL
 
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