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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Gday Guys n Gals,
I'm from Australia- and I've been getting back into shooting over the last 12months or so (after nearly 20 years away).
I'm teaching my son what I know , and learning lots of new gear and techniques with him at the same time too.
I've started with a few platforms I'm familiar with , but I foresee an HK or two in my future, so I thought I'd join here to learn what I can before making a purchase.
P
 

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Welcome from a new guy in Florida, USA. I've found the people on this site to be very willing to share their knowledge.
 

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Welcome to the land of the free.

My understanding of the Australian Gun Laws include:

(2) The objects of this Act are as follows:
(a) to prohibit the possession and use of all automatic firearms,
self-loading rifles and shotguns (including pump action
shotguns), except in special circumstances;
(b) to establish an integrated licensing and registration scheme for
all firearms;
(c) to require each person who possesses or uses a firearm under
the authority of a licence to establish a genuine reason for
possessing or using the firearm;
(d) to provide strict requirements that must be satisfied in relation
to the licensing of firearms and the acquisition and sales of
firearms;
(e) to ensure that firearms are stored and conveyed in a safe and
secure manner;
Important concepts Part 2
Section 6
R47
24/08/16
Firearms Act 1996
Effective: 24/08/16
page 5
Authorised by the ACT Parliamentary Counsel—also accessible at ACT Legislation Register - Home
(f) to provide for an amnesty period to enable the surrender of
certain prohibited firearms.

Is the above information correct?

Just curious as to what an individual has to provide to the Australian Government in order to "...to establish a genuine reason for possessing or using the firearm..."

This question is not intended to start any controversy, I am simply curious as to what is considered a "genuine reason" in the territory that you live in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the welcome!
Joe, The quote mentioned ab love is a summary of the "intentions " of the Firearms Act (for one State only- all are a little different)
The actual laws are far more specific.
For handguns, "Genuine reasons " for the average citizens mean that they are a member of a Sporting Pistol Club - and they must complete a minimum number of shoots through a year for each tree of pistol they own (centrefire/rimfire/air). There are also caliber and magazine capacity restrictions (generally nothing above 9mm/.357 cal , and 10 round mags - there are a few exceptions re caliber)
Transport and storage are tightly regulated, and self defence is not considered a justification for owning of use.
Security officers have a totally different class of license .
For long arms, "genuine reason " can be sporting use OR hunting/vermin control (two totally different "justifications") . Generally all action types and caliber share available ((most with 10round mag limits), accept semi-autos which are restricted to some professional shooters and land owners.
So we have access to a "fair"amount of nice stuff - but we have to work to get it.
There are lots of loopholes and things that don't make sense , for example, on my sporting pistol license I cannot own Even ONE 17round mag for my Glock34 - but I can buy TWENTY of the 10round mags without question if I wanted!
There's a lot more to it all - that should give you an idea though.
 

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If you want a Fudd guns, it's basically doable. No semi autos. No pump shotties. No folding stocks. No pistol grips. Nothing that looks or smells tactical or military. 5-10 rounds mag capacities. Pistols have to be big in size (barrel length) and small in caliber.

Genuine reason means you have to work for it. You cannot just buy even a hunting rifle and put it in the cupboard. You need to actively be an engaged club member and / or hunter. If you want a pistol, you need to commit a bunch of time and effort to getting and keeping one. Oh and buy a safe and submit to police checks.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Folding stocks are permitted in some states (not mine though) although the overall length must still reach a certain point (example the Ruger Precision is OK) and pistol grips a fine in most states (not Western Australia)
My Tikka T3 CTR 308 pictured below
Gun Firearm Rifle Trigger Air gun
 

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If you want a Fudd guns, it's basically doable. No semi autos. No pump shotties. No folding stocks. No pistol grips. Nothing that looks or smells tactical or military. 5-10 rounds mag capacities. Pistols have to be big in size (barrel length) and small in caliber.

Genuine reason means you have to work for it. You cannot just buy even a hunting rifle and put it in the cupboard. You need to actively be an engaged club member and / or hunter. If you want a pistol, you need to commit a bunch of time and effort to getting and keeping one. Oh and buy a safe and submit to police checks.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
Sounds almost like a "Police State" to own a firearm in your neck of the woods. Makes us appreciate what we have here in Virginia.
 

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Genuine reason means you have to work for it. You cannot just buy even a hunting rifle and put it in the cupboard. You need to actively be an engaged club member and / or hunter.
All the other draconian bs aside, I don't think this little portion of their laws is such a bad idea. I know a lot of guys who bought an AR when it looked like they're last chance to do so and haven't touched it since. I bet it would take them a couple minutes to figure out how to load the thing lol, let alone hit anything with it. It wouldn't hurt for them to be forced to shoot it once in a while in case they ever actually needed to. I think that owning firearms is only part of being a responsible citizen -- being trained in their use, safe handling and storage is the part that takes a lot more time, money and commitment. I would be happy if the NFA was done away with altogether and replaced with some sort of training mandate that could be fulfilled by private industry if you wanted to pay for higher quality training or government funded sessions to fulfill basic requirements so ownership wasn't priced out of reach for anyone, perhaps on our domestic military installations.

E.g. you can walk into your LGS and buy something full auto with a NICS check but only after you've been appropriately trained on it.

The result would be the anti-gun morons having a lot fewer accidental shootings to point at and a civilian force much more capable of defending itself.

Sorry for that digression, I'm on cold medicine. Welcome Ozzie!
 

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I think that owning firearms is only part of being a responsible citizen -- being trained in their use, safe handling and storage is the part that takes a lot more time, money and commitment.
Well, I agree - the risk is that it wouldn't be long before the "training" became a serious impediment to being able to have a firearm at all. But your approach ends up leading to something like the citizen militia army. Basically, it's your duty as a citizen to be involved in the defence of your community and doesn't fall onto an increasingly narrowly selected professional military class (history teaches us that having a professional military class rarely ends up well).

This is the basic Swiss approach. I have a friend here in Switzerland - his grandfather went to the Town Hall to get married (you have to legally get married separately to the religious element). He was asked to go home and bring back his rifle before they would let him tie the knot. He basically had to show he was willing and able to defend his new family and the community.

Good luck getting that through the snowflakes today!
 

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Well, I agree - the risk is that it wouldn't be long before the "training" became a serious impediment to being able to have a firearm at all. But your approach ends up leading to something like the citizen militia army. Basically, it's your duty as a citizen to be involved in the defence of your community and doesn't fall onto an increasingly narrowly selected professional military class (history teaches us that having a professional military class rarely ends up well).

This is the basic Swiss approach. I have a friend here in Switzerland - his grandfather went to the Town Hall to get married (you have to legally get married separately to the religious element). He was asked to go home and bring back his rifle before they would let him tie the knot. He basically had to show he was willing and able to defend his new family and the community.

Good luck getting that through the snowflakes today!
That's awesome. If only...
 
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