HKPRO Forums banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had previously posted observations about the P30 in a previous thread. I had mentioned that the P30s decocker button was a little hard to get to with my big fingers. Several other people had also commented on the decocker.

At the gun store yesterday several guys were looking at the P30 from the display case. Everyone, except one guy, thought that the decocking lever felt a little awkward and was a little hard to activate.

Here is what seems to happen as I was observing everyone pressing the decocker. It seems that the natural unconscious tendency is to try and push with the tip of the thumb of the grip hand, basically under the fingernail. For you to do this with the P30 you have to move your thumb back a little, which changes the angle that your that you thumb is approaching the decocking button. Now your thumb has to get around the hammer.

They guy that had no problem just flipped his thumb up and hit the decocker with whatever part of his thumb happened to rest on it. After everyone else consciously switched to that method, it felt comfortable and natural.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
exactly....Just put your thumb over the decocker, it doesn't have to be the tip of the thumb, it can be anywhere on the whole finger. With the thumb finger over the decocker just oush downward and it should work.
 

·
ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
Joined
·
1,921 Posts
Same as how I did it with my P2K I didn't see where anyone could have a problem with it myself. So it naturally just carried over to the P30 on the range. But since everyone does things a little differently it just left me scratching my head when someone said they had problems with it. Glad to know you guys sorted it all out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
510 Posts
I had previously posted observations about the P30 in a previous thread. I had mentioned that the P30s decocker button was a little hard to get to with my big fingers. Several other people had also commented on the decocker.

At the gun store yesterday several guys were looking at the P30 from the display case. Everyone, except one guy, thought that the decocking lever felt a little awkward and was a little hard to activate.

Here is what seems to happen as I was observing everyone pressing the decocker. It seems that the natural unconscious tendency is to try and push with the tip of the thumb of the grip hand, basically under the fingernail. For you to do this with the P30 you have to move your thumb back a little, which changes the angle that your that you thumb is approaching the decocking button. Now your thumb has to get around the hammer.

They guy that had no problem just flipped his thumb up and hit the decocker with whatever part of his thumb happened to rest on it. After everyone else consciously switched to that method, it felt comfortable and natural.
Interesting. I have such big hands that I have always done it this way with a USP. I catch the decocker on my usp45 with the side of the first knuckle back on my thumb without regriping.
Interesting observation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,199 Posts
I really like the decocker on the P30/P2K and think that it is one of its best features. It is alot easier for me to decock the P30 then it is on a Sig or USP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
Haven't held one yet.

Can you guys tell me what it's like using your left hand? Us...well me... Lhanders want to know. Can it be done at all with the hammer in the way?

Thanks,
Gayle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Can you guys tell me what it's like using your left hand? Us...well me... Lhanders want to know. Can it be done at all with the hammer in the way?
As for left handed operation of the decocker – I am sitting here holding the P30 in my hands and trying left and right handed decocking. Please forgive me if I am a little verbose but let me explain in a little detail what I think.

For a right handed person – try and picture this - when you are holding the pistol and your right index finger is outside the trigger guard and along the left side of the pistol – the entire length of your index finger and the flesh continuing back to the web of your hand is in contact with the gun. When you move your thumb to the decocker you can keep all of this area on the right side in contact with the side of the gun and also some of the fleshy part of your palm in contact with the backstrap. This gives you some control over the gun.

For a left handed person – the entire situation is the same as the right handed person until you go to move your thumb around the hammer. You CAN operate the decocking button, BUT when I move my thumb around the hammer, the upper part of my hand back to the web comes away from the gun, leaving less surface area of the hand in contact with the side of the gun. Also almost all of the fleshy part of the palms moves away from the backstrap. It feels like I have less control of the gun.

I have big fleshy hands. My wife, (it is actually her gun), is tall and thin – she has long fingers but her hands are not so fleshy. The situation is even worse for her – the fleshy part of her palm is not even touching the backstrap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I don't care for the button style decocker, though it's a simple design and compact compared to a side mounted lever.

I still prefer the traditional lever on the left side ala USP V1, but with a recently purchased P2000 SK, I had no choice but the button.

It's a little awkward, but I live with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,479 Posts
Does it have to be pushed in, or up and then in?

*Just curious*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
For a left handed person – the entire situation is the same as the right handed person until you go to move your thumb around the hammer. You CAN operate the decocking button, BUT when I move my thumb around the hammer, the upper part of my hand back to the web comes away from the gun, leaving less surface area of the hand in contact with the side of the gun. Also almost all of the fleshy part of the palms moves away from the backstrap. It feels like I have less control of the gun.
So a two handed grip would work for us lefties? Almost better than a single hand grip from a rightie?

Thanks
Gayle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So a two handed grip would work for us lefties? Almost better than a single hand grip from a rightie?
Sorry, when I was writing for a single hand grip - I was thinking worst case. It will work for a left handed single or two handed grip.

Better than a single hand rightie? Not necessarily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Am I missing something?

I don't quite understand the concern about the ergonomics of a rear mounted decocking lever. Since the act of decocking would be a means to make the weapon safer, and not as a function to fire the gun in self defense, what difference does it make what is required to operate the lever? I'm thinking that if you are decocking the gun then you are out of harm's way.

Just wondering...

ARKAY
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I don't quite understand the concern about the ergonomics of a rear mounted decocking lever. Since the act of decocking would be a means to make the weapon safer, and not as a function to fire the gun in self defense, what difference does it make what is required to operate the lever? I'm thinking that if you are decocking the gun then you are out of harm's way.

Just wondering...

ARKAY
It's a comfort of use thing. By a similiar analogy, if you had to remove your seatbelt by reaching under the seat and turning a knob clockwise each time, it would still work, but it just doesn't feel as ergonomic and thought out as where the release button has worked well for years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,199 Posts
In and down!
It's really a very smart design!
Yeah I think it is the best decocker on the market. When I shoot Sigs I need to move my hand to decock. With the P30/P2K I just move my thumb and decock without having to move my hand at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Certainly not!!

Every tried decocking while holstered?
I have more sense than to operate gun controls while the weapon is holstered. To do so would be foolhardy at best. Proper training and good tecnique should prevail at all times while handling firearms.

Regards;

ARKAY
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
WOW!...

It's a comfort of use thing. By a similiar analogy, if you had to remove your seatbelt by reaching under the seat and turning a knob clockwise each time, it would still work, but it just doesn't feel as ergonomic and thought out as where the release button has worked well for years.

That's a bit of a stretch isn't it?

Best...

ARKAY
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top