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They did point out that the HK45 should hold 4 more rounds for a gun that size. Dumb!
 

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Does anybody actually read gun rags, let alone place merit in the author's observations?
I give them just as much merit as some stranger on a forum :).

Not all gun writers are idiots. I read the articles and look for what I think is useful info. Sometimes it's not there, but most of the times there is something worth noting.
 

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Does anybody actually read gun rags, let alone place merit in the author's observations?
Yeah, I do. I also have particular author's who I trust and others who I ignore. I do put merit in articles written by several writers. Some guys are also good at doing gun reviews. Personally, I don't write traditional gun reviews. I never want to endorse something without really running and carrying a gun for a long period of time. I carried my Hk45C's for well over a year on a high end protection detail before I penned my first article on the gun, and I have owned and carried P7's since the late 80's that provided the basis for several articles. I am also an anomoly in the business in that I buy my guns at retail and usually don't have things sent to me directly from the gun makers. I usually have a significant personal investment into everything I write on. It keeps things on the up and up and I don't "owe" the maker.

What you have to understand is that gun magazines are in the business of selling magazines first and foremost. I have had many discussions in the past with some very well established folks who also write. I wish there was a way to do a peer reviewed professional journal, but most folks won't pay $50.00 an issue. Maybe with the road technology is going this will be a possibility as a internet subscription thing.
 

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I too, consider the author. There is also something else to consider. Today, information is abundant. One can find very good information on the internet in forums such as HKPro and other sites. Therefore, these authors are very careful about printing anything that cannot be proven, or is merely subjective. I will be so bold as to say that the information competition also ensures that the magazines hire only the most qualified writers for their magazines. Personally, I've noticed higher quality articles overall from the mags over the last five years.
 

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I too, consider the author. There is also something else to consider. Today, information is abundant. One can find very good information on the internet in forums such as HKPro and other sites. Therefore, these authors are very careful about printing anything that cannot be proven, or is merely subjective. I will be so bold as to say that the information competition also ensures that the magazines hire only the most qualified writers for their magazines. Personally, I've noticed higher quality articles overall from the mags over the last five years.
Depends on the type of article. Some guys are really good at taking technical data (that is often available from the net these days) and formatting that information into a review. Not my cup of tea, and often very subjective. What I believe is very much lacking is having real end users writing. Many of the writers out there have no real experience or heavily embellished levels of experience. Back in the old days, writers bio's used to be included in articles. It is the same issue that plagues the net. Many "forum hero's" with massive post counts don't have any real documented background or experience. Along with this, many folks who are well vetted, experienced subject matter experts are turned off by both the internet and writing due to being assailed due to a low post count, or lack of celebrity status. Many of the real experts have been chased off the net. This is also true in the print world as well. It can be very frustrating to write for the magazines.

This is not limited to the gun media, it is all media.
 

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Depends on the type of article. Some guys are really good at taking technical data (that is often available from the net these days) and formatting that information into a review. Not my cup of tea, and often very subjective. What I believe is very much lacking is having real end users writing. Many of the writers out there have no real experience or heavily embellished levels of experience. Back in the old days, writers bio's used to be included in articles. It is the same issue that plagues the net. Many "forum hero's" with massive post counts don't have any real documented background or experience. Along with this, many folks who are well vetted, experienced subject matter experts are turned off by both the internet and writing due to being assailed due to a low post count, or lack of celebrity status. Many of the real experts have been chased off the net. This is also true in the print world as well. It can be very frustrating to write for the magazines.

This is not limited to the gun media, it is all media.
+1 Nailed it.
 

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No problem! Hmm: "Several major police departments in Europe have adopted the P30 and also the HK45" ... police departments in Europe are using a .45??
 

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No problem! Hmm: "Several major police departments in Europe have adopted the P30 and also the HK45" ... police departments in Europe are using a .45??
yeah... they also recommend the HK45 over the P30 for the fact that it's "U.S. made". mmmmh. Who cares... the author got two free guns from HK and wrote a nice ad piece ;) reminds me of the gun reviews in the NRA magazines.....
 

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After reading the article I still stand by my original post. Why pick a firearm based solely on where it's made? How about overall performance, reliability, durability and most importantly, how the shooter performs with it? If all things being equal, then the final decision should be which can I personally afford to train with. Not where it's manufactured.
 

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After reading the article I still stand by my original post. Why pick a firearm based solely on where it's made? How about overall performance, reliability, durability and most importantly, how the shooter performs with it? If all things being equal, then the final decision should be which can I personally afford to train with. Not where it's manufactured.
I agree 100%
 

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After reading the article I still stand by my original post. Why pick a firearm based solely on where it's made? How about overall performance, reliability, durability and most importantly, how the shooter performs with it? If all things being equal, then the final decision should be which can I personally afford to train with. Not where it's manufactured.
Trust me, I have a ton of issues with the article. Stuff like this is why I write the way I do. Keep in mind that the article is a "blog" type article. I felt like it was what I would see from a counter person at a gunshop............and I take most of those with a pound of salt. The idea that the gun is better because it is made in the US is funny for many of us. In the past the best way to ruin a good Euro gun was to make it in the US. What has impressed me the most with the US made HK45's is how good they are "considering" they are made here.

In the case of reliability, performance, durability and shooter performance............this is the biggest issue with many of these reviews. Shooting a couple hundred rounds through a gun and taking a group picture is a very small part of the equation. I usually try to take a gun I am reviewing through a class with a top trainer. This will get a solid round count, test reliability under adverse conditions, truely test ergonomics and running at speed, and have a comparison to the performance against different systems that other students are running. To me, this is really the way to go.

As an analogy that I am sure gtmtnbiker98 will get-Back in the day, I was REALLY hard into Mt. Bike riding. Bike selection was very much like gun selection. One of my favorite bikes was my GT RTS-1. Got fair magazine reviews, but I was sold when I went to my annual trek to the world championships and watched the bike run and perform and talked to the factory riders. I ended up buying the exact bike that won the womens championship. I like to use the gun (or bike, boat, automotive, etc....) media for exposure and to see what is out there. I tend to do a lot of research once I see something I like before I plop my money down (unless it is a purely illogical emotional pride of ownership buy....which I know going in) for something. I look at many people as simply lazy who buy something based on a review by an unknown anonymous author or interent post. Don't even get me started on my thoughts about those who buy based on an internet poll.
 

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Trust me, I have a ton of issues with the article. Stuff like this is why I write the way I do. Keep in mind that the article is a "blog" type article. I felt like it was what I would see from a counter person at a gunshop............and I take most of those with a pound of salt. The idea that the gun is better because it is made in the US is funny for many of us. In the past the best way to ruin a good Euro gun was to make it in the US. What has impressed me the most with the US made HK45's is how good they are "considering" they are made here.

In the case of reliability, performance, durability and shooter performance............this is the biggest issue with many of these reviews. Shooting a couple hundred rounds through a gun and taking a group picture is a very small part of the equation. I usually try to take a gun I am reviewing through a class with a top trainer. This will get a solid round count, test reliability under adverse conditions, truely test ergonomics and running at speed, and have a comparison to the performance against different systems that other students are running. To me, this is really the way to go.

As an analogy that I am sure gtmtnbiker98 will get-Back in the day, I was REALLY hard into Mt. Bike riding. Bike selection was very much like gun selection. One of my favorite bikes was my GT RTS-1. Got fair magazine reviews, but I was sold when I went to my annual trek to the world championships and watched the bike run and perform and talked to the factory riders. I ended up buying the exact bike that won the womens championship. I like to use the gun (or bike, boat, automotive, etc....) media for exposure and to see what is out there. I tend to do a lot of research once I see something I like before I plop my money down (unless it is a purely illogical emotional pride of ownership buy....which I know going in) for something. I look at many people as simply lazy who buy something based on a review by an unknown anonymous author or interent post. Don't even get me started on my thoughts about those who buy based on an internet poll.
Well thought out. Knowing a little about your background, I would lend credence to the things that you write about, but by and large, the majority of gun rags are driven by advertising dollars. That is why you hardly ever read a negative review, despite the gun failing miserable when shot. That is the only point I'm trying to make, not making personal judgement on any gun writer. But some, after observing them shoot and handle firearms should stick to writing about firearms and leave the shooting to those that can. Thanks for sharing your insight, NYETI.
 
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