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Discussion Starter #1
I have owned my P30LS that I bought from Cross Creek Guns since last December. The gun has been a dream, and is dedicated as my competition gun (USPSA Production Division, and Steel Challenge when I get around to it). I thought I'd post some things I noticed and learned about this gun, and perhaps it helps a few folks that either want this gun, or want to shoot it for sport.

Break In

The interwebs are correct when you read that the gun likes a little hotter ammo. This gun has never has a factory round through it, and I began with a light load to work up with. The original load was moving around 1000 f/s with a 124g bullet. This was not enough to get the slide to cycle with any authority. The brass fell out of the gun with this velocity, so back to the drawing board. I moved up a notch in the Hornady book to 1100 f/s and the gun started running just like I wanted. The recoil spring felt like it loosened up around the 800 round mark, but I am still shooting the 1100 f/s load as it gives me great slide speed.

Accuracy

I have only shot 124g FMJ round nose Hornady bullets through this gun on a regular basis. I can absolutely say that it loves this bullet. Hornady makes some of the most consistent, and quality components I have ever tried. Their bullets a easy to load and fly great. I tried three other bullets out of this gun, but the Hornady just out preformed everything else. I would highly suggest someone look at their line for their bullet needs. The gun is very accurate, and is easy to drive. I tested from a ransom rest, and had excellent results. However, away from the rest where the human is taken out of the equation, the stock sights are tough to be consistent with at distance because they are so big. The little target gets too small to really get a consistant point of aim on. I switched to Dawson sights and have not looked back at all. This solved the distance issue for me, and the gun turns out great groups when I am verifying my "zero" on the sights. As everyone already knows, HK's have a ton of mechanical accuracy, the rest is up to the operator.

Speed

This gun is the light LEM, and is completely stock besides the sights and some grip tape. The LEM has a rhythm to shoot at speed. The reset is a little long, and this is a complaint I hear a lot. When I started shooting this gun I had a lot of my peers ask what I was shooting. When they found out, I kinda got the rolled eyes as if to say that you can't run the HK fast. This gun is absolutely able to keep up with any other production division gun out there. I am a big believer in the saying that "it's the Indian, not the arrow". With that being said, I came from a G17 Gen4, and I had to learn this trigger system to become proficient with it. LEM is not a magical end all cure and will not make you faster if you don't put in some work with it. So many times on this forum you hear about DA/SA not working, and LEM is suggested. I would say that LEM can work for a novice shooter, but to run it with speed and accuracy, you need time behind the gun. I watch videos of my stages and see that my concentration sometimes breaks, and my rhythm is slightly off. This gun can run fast, even without a trip to GGI; you just have to learn to drive it.

Reliability

The gun participated in a 2000 round challenge. Basically, you clean it and lube it when you get it, and leave it until it crosses the 2000 round mark. The gun laughed in the face of this challenge, and did not have any issues. I clean it about once every four matches/practice sessions. The gun runs just fine dirty. Here in Colorado we have had a lot of wind lately. I try my best at matches to protect the gun from the fine grit, but it gets everywhere. I went to the safe area and checked it the last match I shot to find that the grit was all over the gun and making it into the inside of the slide. I was not able to do much about it, as field stripping was going to make it worse. The gun functioned great, and the only thing that I noticed was the slide looks a little sand blasted on the front from holstering and drawing with the grit in the holster. The finish is pretty worn here, but the corrosion protection is still in place and there has been no rust issues. The gun has some great character after three matches in a row in these conditions. The gun is built to work in combat conditions, I am sure the conditions I run it in are child's play for it. Also, the magazines have been excellent. Through all of the rounds I have on them, and the countless times they have been dropped on the cement and the dirt they function great. I would only say that they need to be kept clean and dry. I use an Arrendondo mag brush after each range session to keep them happy.

Usability

The P30LS was a must for me, as I needed to get a longer slide for my thumbs forward grip. The slide length is really natural feeling and the gun has great balance. The other question I get is about the high bore axis on this gun compared to a Glock. The bore axis is what the shooter makes of it. If you get used to one thing and switch to something else, you'll notice. However, after getting this gun and dry firing for a few sessions, all of my Glock low bore axis stuff went away. The gun points perfectly, and there is no extra muzzle flip to it. The grip is excellent, and the finger groves fit perfectly. I added some skate board tape to the sides, front strap and back strap. The stock grip was pretty good, but I wanted a more positive grip, and the tape did the trick. I kept the medium all around, and think this is a great size for most hands. The folks that have shot my gun with small and large hands like this set up, and so do I. The safety is a reference point for me. I use it to tell my thumb where it can be and where it cannot be if I don't want to hit the slide release lever. The gun has the shorter lever on it, so this also helps. I am thankful for the presence of the safety on both sides. When I shoot weak handed, my left hand needs all the help it can get, and the safety is perfectly placed. The Dawson sights really helped make this gun more usable for me. The sights have a wider notch in the rear, and a thinner blade. This makes it a lot faster when I am on close targets, but is still usable on the distant ones. The sights were the number one upgrade I did to this gun, the grip was the second. The rest of the gun is stock.

Conclusions and Tips

The gun has been everything I have ever wanted in a production gun. Sure the trigger is not on the 1911 level, but it fits the intent of the division it is shot in really well. I would not hesitate to use this gun for duty, CCW, home defense, range use or obviously competition use. My gun is north of the 6K mark, and has experienced no breakages or stoppages. The gun is not one that is as simple as a Glock to drive. It can be shot well with out too much work, like the Glock; but the get the potential out of it you need to work. I am still working. After giving this gun a try, I firmly believe that folks can be confident that with enough work this gun can run as fast as any other production gun out there.

Here are some tips and tricks I have learned along the way:

-Hotter ammo is better for brake in and increased slide speed

-LEM needs rhythm to shoot fast

-LEM is not a magic easy trigger, it must be practiced to shoot well

-DO NOT over lube this gun. My friend Sam at HK gave me a gentle reminder about this when he had it back a few weeks ago. The trigger becomes gritty when the crap sticks to it and it makes it's way down into the trigger parts.

-Give yourself a chance to learn the nuances of the gun before changing things just because the interwebs say so. HK did a pretty damn good job with this gun from the factory.

Here are some obligatory pictures. Thanks for reading.





 

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Nice review. I have been leaning towards a p30ls v1 for duty use, but i have never carried anything with a safety. but it feels ohh so good in the hand.....
 

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Here are some tips and tricks I have learned along the way:

-Hotter ammo is better for brake in and increased slide speed
I wonder why HK warns against using +P loads when the newer 9mm's such as the Gen 4 Glocks and obviously the P30 are being built to withstand the punishment from hotter loads.

-LEM needs rhythm to shoot fast

-LEM is not a magic easy trigger, it must be practiced to shoot well
I learned this the hard way. I listened to all the hype and thought that I was just automatically gonna be Annie Oakley once I picked up a LEM. Boy was I wrong, I'm still better with my DA/SA but I'm coming along with the LEM and you are right sir. Good word choice with "Rythym"... that's exactly how I would explain it.

-Give yourself a chance to learn the nuances of the gun before changing things just because the interwebs say so. HK did a pretty damn good job with this gun from the factory.

Thanks for reading.
Thank you for posting. A word on your sights, maybe I'll look into these. I currently have Mepro's but the 3 dot sights are just harder for me. I just recently had the pleasure of shooting a M&P with XS big dots on them and it was so easy for me to shoot accurately. Alot of folks warn me against these XS sights, and Heinies are super expensive so I don't know what to do. If my HK45c becomes a dedicated HD gun then maybe I'll look into those Dawson sights with a WML.

Great review, thanks Apollo11.
 

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Fantastic read.
 

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Good read. Thanks for sharing budd!
 

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Nice review. I have been leaning towards a p30ls v1 for duty use, but i have never carried anything with a safety. but it feels ohh so good in the hand.....
For a working duty gun, I think this setup is ideal. Think of all the situations where guns are handled under stress while guys are sorting out who's who and what's what, yet end wihout a shot needing to be fired. It is easy to say 'keep the finger off the trigger' etc....and you should...but the street is not a square range. I'm retired now, but I would happily carry my P30LS V1 as a duty pistol if I had to suit up again now.
 

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Outstanding review! Thank you for taking the time to author and post it.

I too bought my P30LS V1 in .40 S&W from Mike @ Cross Creek Guns and I couldn't be more satisfied with it. My P30LS has become my carry pistol which is the highest praise I can give it.

Darebear: With their limited lifetime warranty, Heckler & Koch is simply looking out for itself by warning against the use of +P and +P+ ammo, steel and aluminum case ammo, and cast lead bullets. What their ammo recommendations are not is any kind of reflection on the pistol itself. They say as much themselves, "Note: Use of +P and +P+ ammunition accelerates wear and reduces the service life on the component parts of any pistol, including the P Series pistols, and is not recommended."

Notice they don't say you CAN'T use this ammo in the pistol, only that they don't recommend it. A translation of this statement goes something like this: This pistol has a lifetime warranty and if you use +P and +P+ ammo in it, it is going to wear faster, parts will have to be replaced sooner, and this is going to cost us money so please don't! :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the kind words on my write up everyone. I am a firm believer that forums are the new way for folks to research things, and it's nice to be able to contribute to some good information.

As for the pressure of the ammo, I am not sure what the pressure I am running is as the Hornady book does not specify. I do know that it is not a +P pressure however, as this was confirmed by Hornady Tech Support. For longevity I think HK recommends standard pressure, and as was said previously there is no defined standard for +P+.

I just got back from a match again today, and the pistol continues to impress. Did a fair bit of one handed shooting and lots of targets with small windows through no shoots. The gun is seriously a dream to shoot.
 

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waiting for one of these WITHOUT the safety, as are many others. great report, thanks!
 

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Terrific read and darned accurate with regard to the LEM trigger. I bought mine as a V2 and converted to a V4. I like the feel of the V4 better than the 2 but LEM still takes some time to realize its full potential and I know I have a ways to go.

One thing I like about LEM is that I think long term the rhythm aspect of shooting with this trigger will actually make you a better shooter. Even if you go back to different trigger variants I have a sneaking suspicion that the things the LEM forced upon you will actually help you. One thing that has really helped me is that the darned thing fits my hand so well and seems so well balanced for me that there is just no strain anywhere at least for me. That is I am sure just pure luck in that it fits my hand and fingers better than anything I have had before. The mag release falls so perfectly for me that I actually have to work to try to screw up and the longish slide release is just not an issue for me (mine does not have the safety so it does have the long slide release).

On the other hand I am not sure you will want to change after putting all the time into getting used to the LEM. For now I am really not shooting anything else as I want to get as completely comfortable with this trigger as I can be. I will sneak in a box with my CZ now and again but only for the heck of it.

Really great write up. Really appreciate you posting this up.
 

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waiting for one of these WITHOUT the safety, as are many others. great report, thanks!
I would have preferred one without the ambidextrous safeties, but it wasn't a big enough deal for me to wait for one. Like many pistols with safeties, they're easy enough to ignore. I never engage mine, it's not in the way, it's a non-issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The one caveat I would add to not using your safety, which I don't use either; is you have to make sure it is not engaged. The presence of that safety must be taken into account. For me, I use it like a 1911 safety and keep my thumb there. I do this for both reference and to make sure it is off.
 

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The one caveat I would add to not using your safety, which I don't use either; is you have to make sure it is not engaged. The presence of that safety must be taken into account. For me, I use it like a 1911 safety and keep my thumb there. I do this for both reference and to make sure it is off.
I don't know about yours, but there's no way mine is accidentally going to engage. Leave it off and it's going to stay that way. It takes not a small amount of conscious effort to engage.
 
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