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Looking at getting a p7m8. Been doing some research on years, where made, what helps the value. Would someone mind giving a brief history lesson on the pro/cons of age, Chantilly, Sterling VA guns vs German. Which ones are more desirable? Just the basics. Thinking I may get one to shoot/carry and one as a collectible at some point. Thanks
 

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Teufelshund Tactical
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You won't find more information on the P7 series in one single place then here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ilVWOg_ju8A&t=7282s

Overall condition, which can rarely be represented in an online sale listing, is the real concern with these pistols, as parts are out of production. In other words, it is easy to make a pistol look good with a simple left and right profile photo. I get pistols in every week that owners think are in awesome shape and a complete disassembly cleaning, inspection and reassembly proves otherwise. Buying the best condition you can afford is always the best advice, regardless of what year of production or specific model.
 

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If I watch that 3 hour lesson, I’m either going to want one, or be afraid to look for one!
I suspect the latter...
Honestly, after a member was kind enough to let me fire one, I’m not sure I get what all the fuss is about. Now when he let me shoot his Mark 23...

!!!! :) :) :)

But being a subject of the People’s Republic of Commiefornia sort of puts the kibosh on trying to find one...
 

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Simply put... condition is key, next the importer Chantilly is the most desirable, then Sterling, then Trussville, then the Euro versions. The accessories (original box, manual, test targets and tools) are also important for value in holding its value.
 

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You won't find more information on the P7 series in one single place then here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ilVWOg_ju8A&t=7282s

Overall condition, which can rarely be represented in an online sale listing, is the real concern with these pistols, as parts are out of production. In other words, it is easy to make a pistol look good with a simple left and right profile photo. I get pistols in every week that owners think are in awesome shape and a complete disassembly cleaning, inspection and reassembly proves otherwise. Buying the best condition you can afford is always the best advice, regardless of what year of production or specific model.
I have always been curious if P7 aficionados like yourself have a contingency plan in place for when parts will in fact be depleted for this system. Has anyone thought of creating or developing a fabrication template for parts and present it to a shop like RCM or ?
 

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Teufelshund Tactical
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I have always been curious if P7 aficionados like yourself have a contingency plan in place for when parts will in fact be depleted for this system. Has anyone thought of creating or developing a fabrication template for parts and present it to a shop like RCM or ?
I have my own stockpile and am working to have replacement parts made here in the US. We'll see how challenging that will be.
 

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I watched that video after I bought my P7 and thought it was great. I wish I had watched it before I had made my purchase. I agree that the condition is very important and it is hard for P7 novices like myself to evaluate thoroughly. I know more now for the next time around, but it'd have been better if I had done my homework first.

Where I differ from the more knowledgeable P7 connoisseurs is that I do not necessarily prize certain attributes (like important marks) more just because the experts some ascribe importance to them. For example, I recognize that the Chantilly guns are worth more but they do not necessarily have any extra utility to me. If you are someone who is interested in buying one just to shoot it, then your evaluation system might be different. That difference can work to your advantage, especially if what you want is not what everyone else wants. So, I suggest paying attention to the experts and learning from them, but you do not always have to feel constrained by what they think when choosing your P7.
 

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If I watch that 3 hour lesson, I’m either going to want one, or be afraid to look for one!
I suspect the latter...
Honestly, after a member was kind enough to let me fire one, I’m not sure I get what all the fuss is about. Now when he let me shoot his Mark 23...

!!!! 🙂 🙂 🙂

But being a subject of the People’s Republic of Commiefornia sort of puts the kibosh on trying to find one...
Why do you state that?

I’m in Kalifornia and have two. I imported one a few years ago. Keep in mind that the California Roster of handguns for sale is only for NEW handguns. You may import guns not on the list.
 

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I watched that video after I bought my P7 and thought it was great. I wish I had watched it before I had made my purchase. I agree that the condition is very important and it is hard for P7 novices like myself to evaluate thoroughly. I know more now for the next time around, but it'd have been better if I had done my homework first.

Where I differ from the more knowledgeable P7 connoisseurs is that I do not necessarily prize certain attributes (like important marks) more just because the experts some ascribe importance to them. For example, I recognize that the Chantilly guns are worth more but they do not necessarily have any extra utility to me. If you are someone who is interested in buying one just to shoot it, then your evaluation system might be different. That difference can work to your advantage, especially if what you want is not what everyone else wants. So, I suggest paying attention to the experts and learning from them, but you do not always have to feel constrained by what they think when choosing your P7.
Wholeheartedly agree. I paid less than $500 for a German trade-in P7M8 > 20 years ago. Liked it so much I bought two of them. I carried one as an EDC for a couple of years and the other sat in the safe. Now both have sat in the safe for probably 20 years. Are the pristine? No. And while I take them out to shoot every now and again, I doubt that I’ll ever shoot ‘em up. So being in pristine condition, or the ability to find spare parts for things that I probably won’t break isn’t that big a deal for me.

Sure, I like new guns and pristine guns just like everybody else, but I’m not a parts guy. The guns I shoot a lot (say 5000+ rounds a year) are either so common or I’ll just replace the gun if/when I shoot it out. Heck, I’ve had guns that I shot 2000+ rounds a month for a year or two and they’re far from being all shot out.

Now I will say it’s pretty crazy what the P7M8s are going for these days. My kids are gonna be pleasantly surprised when it comes time to split up my stuff... lol.
 

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The Precise reason that I have recently sold 3 of the 4 I own...From just two of the P7’s I was able to purchase a new SP5 PDW and optic!

The P7 is still the finest shooting handgun, in my opinion, but it’s time to let go and move on especially with such a complex system like the P7.

Good Point!!!

I have always been curious if P7 aficionados like yourself have a contingency plan in place for when parts will in fact be depleted for this system. Has anyone thought of creating or developing a fabrication template for parts and present it to a shop like RCM or ?
 

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3 hours is an insanely long technical video and it was AWESOME. Marine303 has an obvious passion and a ton of knowledge.

That kind of in depth info is not for everyone but I guarantee you will learn something and there is always something satisfying about watching/dealing with folks who are passionate and know their **** no matter the subject.

I know folks here have sent him their stuff over the years but if I ever have a need I know I damn sure will. Give the video a watch, even if it’s “ background” knowledge.
 

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Simply put... condition is key, next the importer Chantilly is the most desirable, then Sterling, then Trussville, then the Euro versions. The accessories (original box, manual, test targets and tools) are also important for value in holding its value.
Brobus, just for clarification, in the case of the P7 family, would a gun bearing the Chantilly import mark be more desirable than the same gun from the same year imported from Europe with no import mark at all (i.e., private import on Form 6)?
 

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Brobus, just for clarification, in the case of the P7 family, would a gun bearing the Chantilly import mark would be more desirable than the same gun from the same year imported from Europe with no import mark at all (i.e., private import on Form 6)?
Yes, the one with the Chantilly import marks would be worth more then one with no import marks. A great example of this would be the factory .22LR P7K3s. Even though the Euro versions are more rare here in the states, the ones with the Sterling VA import marks sell for about 20 percent more. The euro versions with no import marks would obviously be worth more then the ones with import marks.
 

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Yes, the one with the Chantilly import marks would be worth more then one with no import marks. A great example of this would be the factory .22LR P7K3s. Even though the Euro versions are more rare here in the states, the ones with the Sterling VA import marks sell for about 20 percent more. The euro versions with no import marks would obviously be worth more then the ones with import marks.
Very interesting! Thank you for the info.
 

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Teufelshund Tactical
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3 hours is an insanely long technical video and it was AWESOME. Marine303 has an obvious passion and a ton of knowledge.

That kind of in depth info is not for everyone but I guarantee you will learn something and there is always something satisfying about watching/dealing with folks who are passionate and know their **** no matter the subject.

I know folks here have sent him their stuff over the years but if I ever have a need I know I damn sure will. Give the video a watch, even if it’s “ background” knowledge.
Many thanks. If you check out the channel, you'll see similar, thorough reviews of other H&K weapons. I'll keep them coming.
 

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You won't find more information on the P7 series in one single place then here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ilVWOg_ju8A&t=7282s

Overall condition, which can rarely be represented in an online sale listing, is the real concern with these pistols, as parts are out of production. In other words, it is easy to make a pistol look good with a simple left and right profile photo. I get pistols in every week that owners think are in awesome shape and a complete disassembly cleaning, inspection and reassembly proves otherwise. Buying the best condition you can afford is always the best advice, regardless of what year of production or specific model.
Holy cow, James! That video was 3 hours long!!! I hung in there till the end, and learned a ton. Thanks for putting that out there for us! I must say, after watching I have a MUCH greater respect for my P7M8 I bought used for $700 back in 2000-2001. I’m going to go clean it now!
 

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Priest of the P7
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I have always been curious if P7 aficionados like yourself have a contingency plan in place for when parts will in fact be depleted for this system. Has anyone thought of creating or developing a fabrication template for parts and present it to a shop like RCM or ?
My plan was to buy all the parts I could find, especially springs, pistons, mags, and various other parts that are usual suspects when they quit working. I have a pair of M13s that were high miles and James restored them to function — those are the ones that see all the action. I’m sure they have lots of worn parts that will break along the way so I wanted to ensure they’ll keep running into the future.

Hopefully James will teach his kids and grandkids how to fix P7s so my kids and grandkids will be able to shoot them when we’re both gone haha.
 

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Teufelshund Tactical
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My plan was to buy all the parts I could find, especially springs, pistons, mags, and various other parts that are usual suspects when they quit working. I have a pair of M13s that were high miles and James restored them to function — those are the ones that see all the action. I’m sure they have lots of worn parts that will break along the way so I wanted to ensure they’ll keep running into the future.

Hopefully James will teach his kids and grandkids how to fix P7s so my kids and grandkids will be able to shoot them when we’re both gone haha.
That's the plan :)
 
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