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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm kind of new to rifles, and I've seen some of the other pictures of HK91 clones with wood pistol grips. My grip seems to be one piece with the lower. How can I get a wood grip on my rifle, what do I need to buy? Any tutorials? yea I'm a giant newbie.

Thanks,
TR
 

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As robag99 says, you should be able to get everything at RTG - you'll also need the grip screw if the clipped and pinned lower doesn't come with one and I believe a shorter safety selector - however, I've never messed with any of the plastic lowers so I may be missing something. Your trigger group should come right out of the plastic lower as an assembly, just turn the safety selector around until you can pull it out, then the whole trigger group should slide out. Drop into the metal lower and install the shorter selector lever.

Now the grip I do know a lot about :wink:

They're shipped unfinished, sanded to 80 grit or so. When finishing one, I sand at 100 or 120 grit, followed by 220 grit and then some fine steel wool. You can sand finer if you like, but I generally stop at 220. Burnishing with steel wool will show up any scratches that may have been hiding from you. You can also wet it with a damp cloth before the steel wool, that will show any of the coarser scratches, remove dust, and raise the grain a bit. Following with the steel wool will then cut off the raised grain and give you a smoother finish.

For stain, I often use a mix of minwax "gunstock" and "English chestnut", half and half. This warms up some of the plainer walnut nicely. Not all walnut needs it though, some looks fine just with oil or varnish and no stain. You can get an idea of the finished color before staining by wiping a bit of mineral spirits on the wood after sanding. If you're matching to surplus German stocks, you might need a bit redder stain, like "red mahogany". All the surplus stocks I've messed with have been birch with a heavy red stain, though I've heard early ones were walnut (never seen one myself though). The stain they used seemes to have been a dyed and thinned raw oil, in some cases it penetrates entirely through the part.

Most stain products you buy are wiped or brushed on, then the excess wiped off. They have some mineral pigments in addition to dye, so leaving a heavy application to dry without wiping will give you a muddy look. So apply stain, let stand a few minutes, then wipe off the excess. Leave it to dry overnight, then apply a clear topcoat like Danish oil, boiled linseed oil, or a wiping varnish. Its best to do several very thin coats than a heavy application that requires steel wooling to smooth back out - you risk burnishing through in the high spots in that case.
 
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