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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Where do you guys find Brass or Acrylic punches for use on firearms? I've seen sets here and there, but they are usually, where the brass is concerned, too big. And, I have never seen the acrylic or synthetic tip ones I read about. I've tried Lowe's, Home Depot and the local hardware chain stores. And, yes I called all of the local gun shops. There response is they have the steel ones. It's like a punch other than good ole steel around here is unheard of. Personally, I'd rather be safe than sorry. Yes, scratches may add character, in some peoples opinions, but I'd rather not help that process along. Anybody got a source for the aforementioned?

Thanks
 

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Where do you guys find Brass or Acrylic punches for use on firearms? I've seen sets here and there, but they are usually, where the brass is concerned, too big. And, I have never seen the acrylic or synthetic tip ones I read about. I've tried Lowe's, Home Depot and the local hardware chain stores. And, yes I called all of the local gun shops. There response is they have the steel ones. It's like a punch other than good ole steel around here is unheard of. Personally, I'd rather be safe than sorry. Yes, scratches may add character, in some peoples opinions, but I'd rather not help that process along. Anybody got a source for the aforementioned?

Thanks
Acrylic punches? Never seen those. Acrylic shatters like a mofo though, wouldn't be very good as a punch.

But what are you trying to punch out? If you're talking about the solid pins used a lot in the HK rifles, you NEED steel punches. Some of them REALLY need to be beat upon to get out. As for roll pins, they don't take near as much force, but I still use a steel punch. By being careful, you won't ding anything up.

But if you really want brass punches, you can get them at Harbor Freight for practically pennies. There are a few things nice about brass punches - first, they will bend further before they break, unlike steel which is a little more brittle. And secondly, when they do break, they are a lot easier to drill out and remove than a steel punch.

I have both, but very rarely use the brass ones - most everything I need to punch out is way too tight for brass pin punches.
 

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You might have better luck if you use the term "drift" instead of punch.
CTW - What types of pins are you working with? Roll pins, grooved pins or solid pins? What are they fastening? The two pins I've had to remove recently are the locking lever pin on a G3 carrier, and the roll pin that holds the P7 front sight on. In the case of the G3 pin, it took many very hard swings with a large hammer to get it to budge. I was worried I was going to shatter the pin punch. The P7 sight pin took a lot less force, but the punch got stuck and I was afraid I was going to snap it off. A brass punch would have been good for the P7 pin, but would have mushroomed for the G3 pin.

As for drift punches - a lot of places call them drift punches, but technically a drift punch is tapered. There are drift pins, and there are drift punches. But you do not use a drift punch to drive in a drift pin. The taper of the punch shifts (or 'drifts') the holes into alignment. They are used extensively in sheet metal fabrication to align rivet holes.

Force should never be applied to the end of an actual drift punch. Pin punches are the proper tool to drive pins (drift, straight, or roll) in and out with.
 

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Personally I was able to take apart every piece of my USP with a ball point pen and a pair of pliers, aside from the firing pin of course.
 
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