HKPRO Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I have a clone made from stamped receiver. The A3 stock cap I use does not seat all the way to line up with the pin hole on the receiver. Is there any trick to getting these aligned? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
975 Posts
I had a similar problem with my clone. On the inside bottom edge of the receiver the weld was a little tall and was hitting part of the A3 stock. I just filed that area down a smidge and problem solved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Ok, I got it on, the receiver is clone, and the stock is clone, so there must be some spec issues. I gave the butt cap a couple whacks with 2x4, it went on (but I'm sure it'll be tight if I want it off.)

The end result is pretty good, very tight when closed, and slight up/down wobble when open. Is the HK94 stock tight when fully open with no wobbles? Now I know why people prefer the full stock, there's no cheekweld on the metal stock. A3 stock looks cool and saves space, but not as functional in terms of usage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
280 Posts
The real B&T folding stocks are the best compromise between the solid feel and good cheek weld of a fixed stock and a shorter length of a collapsing stock for stowing away smaller. Do NOT buy the clone B&T stocks off of Ebay or Gunbroker. They are junk and you will hate yourself for wasting the money.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,625 Posts
Ok, I got it on, the receiver is clone, and the stock is clone, so there must be some spec issues. I gave the butt cap a couple whacks with 2x4, it went on (but I'm sure it'll be tight if I want it off.)

The end result is pretty good, very tight when closed, and slight up/down wobble when open. Is the HK94 stock tight when fully open with no wobbles? Now I know why people prefer the full stock, there's no cheekweld on the metal stock. A3 stock looks cool and saves space, but not as functional in terms of usage.
An HK94 in good shape with an A3 stock in good shape will have almost no vertical wobble when the stock is locked in the extended position.

But as for cheekweld - if you learn to use the MP5 like a subgun is meant to be shot, you don't even try for a cheekweld. Shoulders and feet squared to target, butt stock very high up on the shoulder, just below the collar bone and closer to the middle of the chest.

So basically, if you plan on using it for clearing rooms, you want the A3 stock and a cheekweld isn't even used. You want your head to be on a swivel, not welded to a stock.

But for longer range target type shooting where you'd use a bladed stance and a cheekweld, yes, the A2 stock is much more comfortable.

The shoulders square subgun method definitely takes some practice to get used to, especially if you've been shooting rifles all your life and are new to a subgun. It sure felt strange to me at first.

Oh, and eric10mm's comment - what he said! The folding B&T stocks are very good, the cheap ones are junk. They're just as sloppy as the collapsing stock, but in a folding configuration.
 

·
Merchant of Death (Admin)
Joined
·
11,640 Posts
For those who are viewing AviatorDave's comments with a wrinkled brow...

Dave has been through the HKPRO MP5 class (so have I!). This class is taught by the head HK addict around here and is a super condensed version of the old HK ITD course. Let's face it, it's tough to cram an entire week into just one day, but Pro pulls it off as long as nobody passes out. In this class you are taught the correct way to shoulder the MP5. This method usually comes as shock and major pain to those who have been shooting rifles and shotguns all their lives. It's even more difficult for folks with military experience with FA rifles.

The concept of a subgun is for instant reaction at CQB range. There is simply not enough time for a slow, cheek-welded, precision aimed shot. By placing the butt of the stock in a position as describe in the previous post, one retains the ability to be aware of the surroundings and very quickly bring the weapon on target with amazing speed. It's a swing up, front sight, fire thing. Staying square, keeping your elbows down, and using the stock plant pivot is amazingly effective. And yes, it's uncomfortable to learn and deploy.

The retractable stock does not have any bearing at all on this technique because cheek weld isn't part of it. If you haven't been to an HKPRO MP5 class... what are you waiting for? Just don't show up with an Uzi. First, it's bad form, second, it will break. :100000:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
For those who are viewing AviatorDave's comments with a wrinkled brow...

Dave has been through the HKPRO MP5 class (so have I!). This class is taught by the head HK addict around here and is a super condensed version of the old HK ITD course. Let's face it, it's tough to cram an entire week into just one day, but Pro pulls it off as long as nobody passes out. In this class you are taught the correct way to shoulder the MP5. This method usually comes as shock and major pain to those who have been shooting rifles and shotguns all their lives. It's even more difficult for folks with military experience with FA rifles.

The concept of a subgun is for instant reaction at CQB range. There is simply not enough time for a slow, cheek-welded, precision aimed shot. By placing the butt of the stock in a position as describe in the previous post, one retains the ability to be aware of the surroundings and very quickly bring the weapon on target with amazing speed. It's a swing up, front sight, fire thing. Staying square, keeping your elbows down, and using the stock plant pivot is amazingly effective. And yes, it's uncomfortable to learn and deploy.

The retractable stock does not have any bearing at all on this technique because cheek weld isn't part of it. If you haven't been to an HKPRO MP5 class... what are you waiting for? Just don't show up with an Uzi. First, it's bad form, second, it will break. :100000:

Does anyone offer a video tape training on the MP5?
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top