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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Got a quick question. I noticed when I fire more rapidly at the range with my p2000, my support hand (while using the todd jarrett combat grip) gets a little sweaty and starts slipping off. Since my support hand is mainly in contact with my other hand (skin on skin), it gets slippery. This is in contrast to my primary hand which is gripping a nicely textured, high friction, plastic handgun grip.

Am I gripping wrong? With the thumbs forward combat grip, is my support hand in contact with any part of the gun?

Thanks!

jason
 

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Hi all,

Got a quick question. I noticed when I fire more rapidly at the range with my p2000, my support hand (while using the todd jarrett combat grip) gets a little sweaty and starts slipping off. Since my support hand is mainly in contact with my other hand (skin on skin), it gets slippery. This is in contrast to my primary hand which is gripping a nicely textured, high friction, plastic handgun grip.

Am I gripping wrong? With the thumbs forward combat grip, is my support hand in contact with any part of the gun?

Thanks!

jason
Ummm. Bring a towel and wipe your hands between shooting strings or even between magazine changes?
 

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I will sometimes lock the thumb of my firing hand over the thumb of my support hand. Don't know if this will help or not. Are you in an unusually hot or humid climate?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No, not in an unusually hot or humid place. I guess I just grip sorta tightly and just the hand on hand contact gets it sweaty. Not drippy though, just slippery.

I was just wondering how they do it in competition and stuff because just shooting 10 rapid rounds in a row can be difficult to grasp.

Thanks!

Jason
 

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I have the same problem when using the standard "crush grip" that is commonly used by law enforcement. I learned this grip from a magazine article. It is used by most the top target shooters. I'll try to find it since they describe it in better detail.
this is tom jerrett explaining it his way.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=ysa50-plo48&mode=related&search=
The main thing is to get the heal of your support hand as much on the grip as possible. Point both thumbs to the target.
start with the strong hand on. be sure that you have the recoil force lined up to go through the center of your arm. This is often rotated a bit from what is natural to just grab the gun. Try a couple of shots one handed. If you get any left or right motion rotate untill it's dead center.(you will still get up motion of course) The web of your hand should be well seated up in the tang.
Next, keeping the strong hand thumb up out of the way, bring the heal of your support hand to the grip and make some contact.
Position your support hand thumb so that it is pointing at the target. for me it is resting on the side of the slide release. Your hand may be different.
Index fingers of the support hand should come up snug under the triger guard
Next position your strong hand thumb above the support hand thumb, also pointed at the target.
With this grip the strong hand will control most of the up and down movement of the gun, and the support hand applies most of the left and right pressure to the gun. I give the gun a light squeeze left to right, with the support hand pushing tward the strong hand.
My accuracy increaced significantly with this grip. I would not say dramaticly, but clearly better scoring. I shoot out here when its 120 in the shade and I'm sweating like a race horse and zero slip with this grip.
edit note: this seats the support thumb on top of the strong fingers, which helps keep the support hand from slipping down. It also keeps some of the support hand on the grip which is a big part of keeping a solid grip.
 

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Try a nail....kidding sorry it is late and I can't sleep I couldn't help it.
 
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