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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Was MK 2225:




As was typical of all the early semi auto's imported by Golden State Arms, is has a matte blued finish:



Compared here to a 1982 with HK blue/grey paint:

Only 50 were imported in November of 1962 and while this example shows the standard HK attention to detail, it's clearly a military rifle complete with military inspection marks. The 1981 shown above bears commercial inspection marks and as nice as the 1962 rifle is, the 1981 is even better finished. The design features incorporated to preclude select fire modification are better thought out and executed on the later rifles too. All in all, while the earlier rifle is obviously more sought after by collectors, the later one is more practical from a pure shooting perspective.


Usually, collectors prefer rifles without an importer's mark and if there is one, they prefer it to be as small and discreet as possible. The early import G3's are a notable exception to this rule. Not only was an unnecessary import mark applied, it was among the largest ever applied by any importer:

Still, collectors don't seem to mind because these jobbers are highly sought after by HK folks.

I'll eventually be writing an up close and personal article about this rifle (and a July 1962 one too) on my upcoming website and I'll let you guys know when I do. Enjoy!
 

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Was MK 2225:




As was typical of all the early semi auto's imported by Golden State Arms, is has a matte blued finish:



Compared here to a 1982 with HK blue/grey paint:

Only 50 were imported in November of 1962 and while this example shows the standard HK attention to detail, it's clearly a military rifle complete with military inspection marks. The 1981 shown above bears commercial inspection marks and as nice as the 1962 rifle is, the 1981 is even better finished. The design features incorporated to preclude select fire modification are better thought out and executed on the later rifles too. All in all, while the earlier rifle is obviously more sought after by collectors, the later one is more practical from a pure shooting perspective.


Usually, collectors prefer rifles without an importer's mark and if there is one, they prefer it to be as small and discreet as possible. The early import G3's are a notable exception to this rule. Not only was an unnecessary import mark applied, it was among the largest ever applied by any importer:

Still, collectors don't seem to mind because these jobbers are highly sought after by HK folks.

I'll eventually be writing an up close and personal article about this rifle (and a July 1962 one too) on my upcoming website and I'll let you guys know when I do. Enjoy!
Thank you for that!!!!!! I'm a HUGE fan of the Santa Fe G3's, and hopefully one day an 11/62 will be hanging on the wall. :biggrin:

Please let me know when you post...… Thanks again!!!!
 

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I see the clipped trigger housing. The paddle release, and a push pin in different locations.

Is the trigger housing held in place with that push pin? Can you tell us how that is set up? Can we see photos of it disassembled?

Super cool rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes, the push pin retains the trigger housing but it doesn't swing down like a standard G3 or the March of 1962 imports would. I'll be posting all of it once everything is up and running.
 

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I wonder how a rifle made 9 years before I was born could look so much better then me, time capsule �� for sure.
 

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As a testament to HK's great mechanical uniformity;

Taking my MK G3 (2201) and my IB code 91, you could swap the scope ringmount (though zeroed for the 91) the impact @ 100m was off just a couple cm on the G3.

Not bad for spanning over 20 years of production.

Conelrad
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Will do.
 
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