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What ever it is its not ready yet and they couldn't tell us. But more word in the next couple of months. But they said it would really cool!
 

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Damn! Finally had the chance to run thru this thread! Thanks for putting in the effort to keep us informed and entertained!
 

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Ok, I promised this a day or two ago - how about the agenda for the weekend - we’ve already done Thursday night, Friday and Saturday. Tomorrow is the last day (sad), and most of us are headed home on Monday. It’s about a five hour drive for me, although we’ve seen guys from the west coast and New England. I’ve probably talked to 10-15 other students, there are 30 (I think) in the class. Five of them are on my squad, so we attend the instruction periods together. The other folks I’ve spoken with came about during breakfast or lunch breaks (provided by WOFT), or dinner where we all kind of congregated in the lobby around supper time.

So what’s my week been like? I left home on Thursday and took a leisurely drive from SC to the Orlando area. Easy peasy. Took some non-interstate routes and looked up and saw Camp Blanding, which is apparently a major USAR post for the Army Reserve and FL National Guard. They have a museum - so I’ll probably stop on the way home. I screwed around a bit on the way down and showed up at the hotel around 5p. We drove out to WOFT and had a meet and greet and said hello to the guys from HK. They did let us know that the surprise announcement wasn’t quite ready yet, so perhaps we’ll see it in a few months. No idea what it is and everybody is pretty tight lipped about it. There for a few hours and then back to the hotel. Met up with a local pal for dinner and we went out a Italian place across from the hotel.

Up early on Friday and headed for WOFT. We started with a breakfast provided by WOFT - eggs, bacon, super duper hot coffee. Then on to our first training rotation. Our first class was with James Williamson and it was focused on CCW using the VP9SK. We worked on body positions, drawing from holster, and engaging at various distances. I learned two helpful things from this session - 1. Foot position is super important. When shooting pistols from the safety of my static little 3‘ box at the gun range, I typically angle my body 45 degrees with my weak shoulder pointing forward and my strong foot to the rear. That works well if nobody is trying to kill you and you don’t have to think about moving. My instinctive setup (simply because I’ve always done it that way - with no particular formal training to say that’s the way to do it…?) was debunked in about two seconds by James. James asked us to assume our regular stance and pretend that we were holding a weapon and to focus on his face. Then, he suggested, we should close our eyes and rotate our feet - move them so that we weren’t standing with our feet at a 45 degree angle (most were), but instead to not move our body, not move our heels, but rotate our feel so that they were pointing at James. And then open our eyes. **** me if my point of aim hadn’t shifted to now I wasn’t pointing my gun at James any longer - I was pointing about six inches past his right side. Why would I move my feel from a 45 degree angle to parallel positions? What if I needed to move? Yeah, that was an eye opener. The whole session had all sorts of nuggets offering suggestions on how to be better. Our way wasn’t necessarily “wrong”, but the course (and, really, the whole weekend) was all about “think about doing it this way…” And, honest, ”my way” wasn’t something that I learned at the heels of somebody like Jeff Cooper, it was just something that I picked up over the years. And, really, I’m a pretty decent pistol shot. I wouldn’t have guessed that a slight correction like that would have impacted my point of aim. It’s all about the muscular and skeleton system - your feet move, your legs move, your hips move, your chest moves, your shoulder moves, your arms move. And all of a sudden you’re shooting at some dude that is no longer there - and he’s likely gonna be pissed and will shoot back. Eye opening. The second thing that I learned is to use a cadence when shooting. I think I’m pretty smart and I count shots to know when I’m out of bullets and need a mag change, but the whole idea behind cadence is to shoot at the appropriate speed for the distance you’re shooting from. It makes sense that these kinds of drills will make you a faster shot too. We used various forms of “One thousand one (bang), One thousand two (bang), One thousand three (bang)”, etc. And then “One and Two (bang). One and Three (bang), One and Four (bang), One and five (bang), etc.”, then on to “One (bang), Two (bang), Three (bang), Four (bang), Five (bang).” All in all a very nice way to control your rate of fire - without making it too complex. Something I really hadn’t thought about doing before. My formal training consists of the Army, literally thirty years ago, where pistol shooting wasn‘t in vogue for the typical infantry grunt. Along the way, I’ve attended a variety of ”shooting classes” where the instructor was most likely the one that got that got his instructor certification from a Cracker Jack Box. That’s on me, though, not them. This class was the first formal shooting class that I’ve attended beyond, “Introduction to shooting” (in fact, I’m an NRA Basic Rifle/Pistol/etc. Instructor and have trained/introduce literally thousands of young people to shooting). So, all in all, I thought I had my **** together and learned some nice tips in the first five minutes of the class. There were plenty of other tips that came across in the training, but you should attend your own class and see what you know and what you think you know. I’ll definitely take more classes with James - and will focus on those longer classes he offers instead of shoe-horning a bunch of stuff into three hours.

Then we all headed towards the main classroom and everybody had an opportunity to comment on what they liked and disliked - this took place after each session and was a good session to learn what worked well and what didn’t work so well for the other students.

Then we were headed off to the ”coffee shop” for lunch. Lunch consisted of sushi, chicken, salmon, salad, snacks, and a variety of deserts. It was all very good.

Ok, after lunch, we headed off to hang out with Bob Schultz from HK. He’s their director of training and we had an abbreviated Armorer’s Course on the VP9. Google Bob and you’ll see some great videos, and you’ll probably read up on this guy. He’s been described by some as the guy who has forgotten more about HKs than most people know. Bob began his conversation with the history of HK and the early years of the company. We talked about the various product lines, his experiences, and then we just lobbed random questions at him - none of which he wasn’t able to answer. We spent about half of the three-hour block talking about various HK initiatives and the history of the company and Bob’s experiences. It was, simply put, incredible value of an HK aficionado - in fact, I think it was worth the entire cost of the course. We then get into the VP9 and learned how to detail strip everything abut the trigger control part. In short, we took everything apart on the slide and had conversations about how the receiver worked. We just wouldn’t have had time to detail strip the receiver. I’ll probably take a VP9 class with James as it’s different enough from the USP and the P30/HK45 models (all of which are similar enough that if you can detail strip one of those, you can detail the rest of them too).

Back to the main classroom (which is in the lowlight facility) and we debriefed.

Then there was an extra event on Friday night - we headed down to the 100 yd range, which starts inside of a huge air-conditioned building with airplane hanger type doors that opened up to the range. It was a pretty cool room and, if you’re gonna shoot in Florida and the temperature is 100 degrees (it has actually been very pleasant, weather-wise, this week). So… we hit up the 100 yd range and shot the M27 and the SDMR (Squad Designated Marksman Rifle). Some folks got to shoot the MP7 as well, and we all drooled over the XM8. It got late and we all wrapped up at around 7:30p - since we had arrived by 7:30a for breakfast, it was a 12-hour day.

Then off to dinner - we found some local place that was a Fish & Chips kind of place - I actually had ”Bangers & Mash”, which sounds pretty disgusting but was actually pretty good.

Ok, Saturday morning rolls around. Up at 6a to goof off and get ready, out the door by 7a and then at the WOFT facility by 7:30a. Breakfast was the same as Friday morning, lots of variety and plenty of food. And bacon. Did I mention the bacon? Good way to start the day.

My first session this morning was with Tom Dresner, the founder of HKPro.com and a self-admitted HK fanatic. Tom worked with us on the MP5/SP5 and this was a morning full of shooting. Most of us shot several hundred rounds of 9mm through out this session. We learned a little bit about the history of the MP5 and, most interestingly, Tom’s experience with the MP5. We learned various carry methods, shooting SA and FA, drills on how to move and shoot, focusing on turning (90 degree and 180 degrees), and working together as a team to advance on a target as a line of shooters shooting to stop the bad guys (steel targets). It was a very informative and fun morning (who doesn’t like shooting machineguns?). I feel bad that this will be my shortest review section in this email, but I assure you that’s because I’m pretty well versed in the MP5 and have tens of thousands of rounds down range with them. Tom covered the basics, was rigorous on safety issues, and then spent a **** load of time having us shoot. Let me say that again, a ****load of time. One of my pals mentioned on the way back to the hotel that we had all shot probably 500 rounds by the time we completed the MP5 course. As Tom called it, “OPA and OPG” - who wouldn’t like that? No ****, I thought.

Ok, back to the debrief where we talked about want went well, what needed work, etc. All in all, a very enjoyable morning.

My afternoon session this afternoon was the low light shoot house. This was the coolest thing I’ve done in a LONG time. Let me tell you the last time I shot in complete darkness? It was probably in 1987 at Fort Campbell when I was a grunt in the 101st. And then we had daylight, twilight, and even moon light. When was the last time I shot in a completely dark, zero light environment? Ummm, let’s see… oh, that’s right, NEVER. We talked about how important it is to carry a flashlight with you when you carry a handgun. And, uh, yeah, this is something I had previously done… maybe every tenth Friday in February. So it was pretty cool. How did it work? The rest of the team got up in the balcony and watched the scenario. It was a big garage with a mini-van in it. Phil pointed at me and said, “you’re first”. Damn. Everybody goes upstairs and I gear up with a VP9 setup to handle UTM munitions - basically a pellet gun that shoots a low power round. The idea was that I was leaving the mall after hanging out with an old friend and entered the COMPLETELY ABSOLUTELY 100% DARK (scary dark) “garage” to get in my car and go home. I had a key fob for the car, a flashlight, and my VP9 UTM gun. We each did five scenarios - I did five in a row. The first time I walked in the room I turned on my flashlight and scoped out the room and looked for bad guys. Hmm. Interesting, I didn’t see any. So I started walked towards the mini van. Some random dude all decked out in protective gear approached me and wanted money. I kept an eye on his hands and basically told him to **** off. He wasn’t listening too much, so I shined my 3000 lumens flashlight in his face and told him to hit the road. Then I looked around the room for another bad guy, didn’t see anyone and then headed for the car. I got in the car and had just gotten myself situated and saw another bad guy coming for me - I grabbed for the key fob and had to look at it closely to figure out how to lock the door. Ok, boom, exercise over. But, you know, does it really make sense to lock yourself in the car with a bad guy on the other side of the drivers door? Hmm. Probably not. Assume that I have my wife and kids with me. Am I really gonna blast off a round through the window at the guy? All sorts of legal/morale issues with that. Ok, I come out, they turn on the lights and start providing feedback on what I did, what I could have done better, and what could have gotten me killed. Come to the class yourself if you wanna figure out those kinds of things. Ok, boom, I go back outside and then I’m back in a few minutes later. Boom, I make it to the car with no threats and no worries. Ok, that’s cool. That’s pretty much what happens most of the time when you go out to your car in the parking lot at the mall, right? Sure. Boom, back outside. This time I come back in and I’m using my flashlight pretty liberally the whole time (on all my scenarios) as it’s dark as **** in this room. Have I mentioned zero light - that I couldn’t see ****? Yeah, it was that dark. Ok, I come in and I have TWO FREAKEN’ guys approach me. The key to my survival is I kept moving, keep my attention on these guys, and shined my light all over that garage. There were some very tight spaces (between the drivers door and the wall of the garage) - I was very leery about putting myself in such a tight funnel. My adrenalin is pumping and I’m thinking, man, there’s a lot to think about. Then Phil turns on the lights and asks me what I saw. I say, “two guys” and he asks me, “what else did you see? did you see that guy?” I turned around and there’s a little 3” tall statue of a king-type guy looking like he came from the British pub we visited last night standing in the middle of the room, just steps behind me. I’m like, “no ****en’ way” was that thing standing there just a moment ago. I point to one of Phil’s cohorts and I’m like, “did you just put that there when my back was turned?” And they’re like, “no, it was there the whole time”. I think I said something like, “Shazam! That’s straight out of I dream of Jeanie - no way was that funky little statue thing standing there when I walked the course.” You know it, it sure was. All the people in the balcony were like, “Yep, been there the whole time.” I missed it - serious tunnel vision. Ok, lesson learned. My fifth session rolled around and I walked in and there are THREE FREAKEN’ BAD GUYS in there. Two in front of me and between me and car and some dude that came out of nowhere but he’s behind me. ****. The one guy with the mouth (Phil) is going on about wanting money or asking me for a smoke or something - I’m trying to watch the two guys in front of me and the one guy behind me, opening up distance and maneuvering so I don’t have to fight on two different fronts. I’m pretty worried about what’s happening with the guy behind me, but, you know, he could be just some dude like me in the garage going for his car. Other than scaring the crap out of me, he’s not done anything to really cause my alarm to fire. But the two guys in front of me? They’re approaching fast. Phil more so than the other guy. They preach you should use your voice, your flashlight, and keep your eyes on the bad guys hands. Phil approaches me and I’m trying to use my drill sgt voice to get him to “STOP” and “BACKUP” and he’s having none of it. I can’t see his right hand. It’s behind his body, but it’s not obvious that he’s holding a weapon. I think he’s about 15’ away from me when I see him sweep his right hand forward and he’s got a knife. I’m a HUGE BELIEVER in the Tueller Rule and immediately draw my VP9 (three-o’clock strong side holster) and put three rounds in Phi’s chest. Guess what? It’s not over. Phil is laying on the ground bleeding and asking why I shot him and he needs help. The other bad guy that was in front of me starts moving in on me asking me why I shot his friend and I point the flashlight in his eyes, and am pretty sure I kept him at gunpoint - I can’t honestly remember. And then, speaking of remembering, I remember there’s a third guy behind me. I glance over my shoulder and he’s just standing there near the entrance and I can’t recall if he said anything. But he’s not charging me, which is good. I try to put some space between me and the more obvious threat. I yell at the guy at the door to call 911 and direct my attention back to the guy in front of me - he’s coming at me. I’ve definitely got him at gunpoint and I’ve got 3000 lumen’s right in his face (sorry about that…). I‘m telling him to **** off and to get on the ground and he could give two ****s about what I’m saying and man, he’s pissed. I’ve just shot his friend. I’m really worried about him coming at me, but I’ve not seen any offensive move (other than him seriously (seriously, good job) looking like he wants to kick my ass. But, you know, no gun, no knife, I’m trying to not just shoot anything that moves. I glance back at the guy behind me and he’s on the phone to the cops and has both his hands in the air. I can’t remember if I told him (in my drill sgt voice) “hands up” - I think I did, but can’t say so one way or the other. So now the guy in front of me is not doing **** that I want him to do - and i get to wondering, why the **** am I trying to get this guy to “GET DOWN” - I’m not a cop and he clearly isn’t doing **** that I want him to do. He then heads for his shot friend (Phil) and he kneels down to help him. I’m getting kind of worried that one of them will pull out a gun or the not-shot guy will make a move on the knife that is laying on the ground. I’m hollering and blubbering and tell them something stupid like, “Don’t touch that knife” when they mercifully call the scenario and the lights come on.

Turns out that Phil was a LOT closer to me than I thought - I thought he was 15’ away - everybody else said in the critique that he was about 5’ away from me. So… ****. Screwed up that Tueller rule - which I knew about and had consciously thought a lot about in the past. Then somebody was like, “Dude, what the **** were you sticking around for?” And, you know, good question. I had just plugged some guy and, what, was I waiting for the referee to come out and ring a ****en’ bell or something? Whether you decide to stick around for the cops or not, you can call the cops from three blocks away or from the safety of the mall. There’s no law anywhere on the books anywhere in the US that requires you to stay in a dangerous situation. And it was ****en’ A dangerous with that second guy looking at me with murder in his eyes. He would have kicked my ass in a real life scenario. On a more positive front, people said that I drew quickly and didn’t hesitate - but I kind of knew this was coming. Would I hesitate in real life? Again, I realize that 21’ and a knife and you‘re as good as dead. I’d like to think that I’d at least do that part again.

There are so many thoughts running through my mind, even now, ten hours later. Truth be told, my heart got to racing a bit as I was typing this post. All I can say is that was a very valuable training experience that made me think about things I could have done differently and the things that I actually did. I’m for sure a novice at this kind of stuff, and the great thing about WOFT is that they train to your level. There was a Ninja 10x in my group and when he went later in the day all three of the trainers jumped on him - so WOFT really does try to map to your level and it’s all about building blocks and causing you to think. Also it was great fun. Who doesn’t think about doing stuff like this? But, you know what? I can’t think of a single gun person in my circle who has gone out and done this type of training. I learned a lot today and it’s all scratching the surface.

Highly, highly, highly recommend this experience for anyone.

Since I had the honor (?) of going first, I got to watch five other guys go through their own five scenarios. It was great and I’d bet that they all enjoyed it.

We debriefed as a group later and then headed to the 100-yd range at the end of the day and we all got trigger time on the XM8 and the MP7. Bonus material, for sure. Lots of fun and I’ve posted a handful of the videos.

Ok, tomorrow? Tomorrow is going to be pistol shooting with a red dot and then the “coffee house” scenario. Totally looking forward to it.i
 

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Just completed the coffee shop and we’re having lunch now. Probably did five or six scenarios and I didn’t even draw my gun for 90% of them. I did draw down on the first guy, but didn’t shoot him mostly because everybody else in the room ventilated him.

Then there Was a scenario where I took a round to the face. Damn. Then the last round, active shooter, I got nailed pretty quick. More comments and pictures towards the end of the day. Lunch now and the red dot handgun shooting. 😁
 

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Er spricht schlechtes Deutsch...
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Morning, gents, and greetings from MCO. I am at the gate and waiting for a connecting flight. Will be a long day, but what a great weekend. I am still amazed at how cool it was. It was cool because of folks like danbrew and many others. Great times! I am exhausted, but it was so worth it. As for the auction items, I won the beer stein. I missed out on those when they debuted, and was glad to snag one. The rifle pistol combo went for a paltry $4875 and was grabbed up by our very own @straightgrain.

More later, but safe travels home for everyone. Tentatively, we are shooting for six months out for another one. I know slots will go fast, because there is already one paid in full registration, without knowing what the dates will be. Holy smoke. I will post some pix later as well.
 

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@danbrew just wanted to say great writeup and would +1 everything you've said, but most especially the line: "Highly, highly, highly recommend this experience for anyone."

It was an honor and a privilege to train with all of you. Looking forward to doing it again.
 

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Hello everyone!

I haven't been on the forums in awhile, but what makes these events so special aside from the great camaraderie and wonderful trainers, is that some of us get to rediscover and rekindle the HK-addiction.

First, thank you to Straightgrain for arranging this event, you did a great job and you are an awesome cheerleader!

Second, thank you to the WOFT staff for providing an exceptional facility and experience that exceeded my high expectations. I could not have been more impressed by the professionalism and hospitality shown to us and to me personally.

Third, thank you to all the participants. Although I didnt get a chance to get to know all of them, those that I had a chance to share conversations with and especially those in my group...meeting all of you was worth the price of admission.

Special thanks to:

Derek Giddings: For someone who had not instructed before, you are a natural. Your enthusiasm and real desire to see others succeed is obvious. I hope you seriously consider doing alot more instruction, this community would be richer for it.

Teufelshund: James, your teaching philosophy is exceptional. I've learned to do many different things from different instructors in my life from celebrity firearms instructors to 2-Time James Beard Award family members teaching me how to cook. I can't remember the last time a 15 minute block of instruction opened my eyes more than your one-handed shooting instruction. Thank you.

HKPRO: What really is there to say? You're the guy I hope to be, in every respect.

Heckler and Koch: You love us. You really love us.

This was a great event and I'm very much looking forward to doing it again. It's hard to imagine a more worthwhile program for the HK enthusiast.
 

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What to say about this event, I mainly went for the HK portions of the event with the WOFT parts as the other parts. I was really surprised and humbled with the training I received. The coffee house scenarios were a real eye opener as I didn't realized how extremely fast things deescalate and your reaction times matter with your split second decision making in the balance between shooting or running away. If you have never thought about how extremely quick your life can change, and not training to best self might be the difference between life and death for you or a loved one. So look up the WOFT website and check out their training scenario training. Extremely highly recommended! As for the HK training events, the once in a life time to shoot the XM8 5.56 was spectacular. Getting to go full auto on an MP5, MP7, and a M27 infantry automatic rifle was now an itch to do it more often! Thanks to Jeff, James, Derrick, Tom, Bob, Phillip, and all of the other great instructors over this past weekend; you made this event 100 times better. Derrick I know it was your first time teaching red dot, but you did a fantastic job and I learned what I needed to get started practicing with my own red dot pistol.

If this event happens again next year, you all have to go, it is worth the money and time for one of a kind experiences. Make good life choices(inside joke)!
 

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My AAR of the event:

 

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I’m sorry, I can’t make that promise.

Here‘s the rest of the story for those of you who weren’t with us (and maybe some who were…). So there we were in the low light room, really, “no light” scenario and during my run they had moved around some of the props. Phil was debriefing me and asked me if I had seen “the other guy” and I was like, “what other guy?” He grins and points behind me and there, not 1 foot away from me is this nutcracker statue. I was seriously astounded, so much so that I didn’t believe that thing had been there all along. It had been. The lesson? You get tunnel vision when you’re in a situation like that and your adrenalin is pumping. And, of course, tunnel vision can kill you.

So I finish up my scenarios and I’m now an observer In the balcony. Somebody else is doing their exercise and it was completely dark in the room. I pulled off my shirt and just stood there. To be fair, I wasn’t expecting the participant working the scenario to see me - but nobody else did either once the lights came back on. I stood there sans shirt for almost five minutes before anybody noticed. Lol.
 

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I think I can start by saying that this event exceeded my expectations in every way.

The WOFT facility is awesome. The ranges are well outfitted, the grounds are beautiful, the indoor facilities are well appointed, everything is clean and the food provided for breakfast and lunch everyday is really good. The staff are absolutely fantastic. They’re super accommodating and helpful, from making sure you have loaded magazines to making sure you’re staying hydrated. The focus on safety is excellent and the realism of the lowlight and the coffee shop scenarios is top notch. Phillip and the whole WOFT team just do an amazing job to make sure you get the most from your experience and you leave having learned a lot.

@HKPRO has so much to share. Even though I shoot the MP5 regularly, Tom helped me identify things I can do better in my operation of the firearm. I definitely need to get more efficient at those reloads. Tom is also super personable and has a ton of great information to share beyond the firearm instruction.

@bystok is a great instructor, even though he doesn’t identify as one. Derek helped me gain a level of comfort with the VP9 outfitted with red dots. I went from uncomfortable in the draw finding the dot, to running the shoot house with my new friends in an afternoon. Derek has a great sense of humor and the afternoon flew by.

@Teufelshund Tactical really helped me overcome my weak strong hand pistol shooting, which was a skill that came in useful in the training scenarios the following day. James had a methodical approach to training, concepts and techniques building upon one another. I think this is a very effective way for most people to learn. You can always talk about Bojangles or Magnum PI during breaks. James has some great stories to share, particularly about free fall parachute failures!

@straightgrain I really enjoyed chatting with you. Thank you for all of your help organizing the event. Thank you for bringing your post sample MP5’s for us to shoot, and thank you for providing the 4.6x30 ammunition for the MP7 demo shoot. We could all see that you were expending a lot of effort to make sure everyone really enjoyed themselves.

Getting to run the M27 IAR, the MP7 and XM8 was an awesome experience. Particularly getting the trigger time on a real unicorn, the XM8. Attending an abridged VP9 Armorer course with Bob Schultz is a wonderful experience. Picking Bob’s brain and getting stories about the development, teething and success of various weapons platforms and accessories was definitely another highlight of the trip. Thanks to Heckler & Koch for supporting this event, bringing experts for us to interface with and providing some amazing firearms to shoot.

Lastly, meeting my fellow HK aficionados was fantastic. Being around people that suffer from the same HK affliction that I do, is not an opportunity we get everyday. I really enjoyed meeting everyone. I particularly enjoyed the time I spent with those in my group. Everyone was dialed in, knowledgeable, supportive and a lot of fun to spend the weekend with.

I’ve already reserved my spot for the next event and I hope I see you guys there!
 

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Teufelshund Tactical
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I think I can start by saying that this event exceeded my expectations in every way.

The WOFT facility is awesome. The ranges are well outfitted, the grounds are beautiful, the indoor facilities are well appointed, everything is clean and the food provided for breakfast and lunch everyday is really good. The staff are absolutely fantastic. They’re super accommodating and helpful, from making sure you have loaded magazines to making sure you’re staying hydrated. The focus on safety is excellent and the realism of the lowlight and the coffee shop scenarios is top notch. Phillip and the whole WOFT team just do an amazing job to make sure you get the most from your experience and you leave having learned a lot.

@HKPRO has so much to share. Even though I shoot the MP5 regularly, Tom helped me identify things I can do better in my operation of the firearm. I definitely need to get more efficient at those reloads. Tom is also super personable and has a ton of great information to share beyond the firearm instruction.

@bystok is a great instructor, even though he doesn’t identify as one. Derek helped me gain a level of comfort with the VP9 outfitted with red dots. I went from uncomfortable in the draw finding the dot, to running the shoot house with my new friends in an afternoon. Derek has a great sense of humor and the afternoon flew by.

@Teufelshund Tactical really helped me overcome my weak strong hand pistol shooting, which was a skill that came in useful in the training scenarios the following day. James had a methodical approach to training, concepts and techniques building upon one another. I think this is a very effective way for most people to learn. You can always talk about Bojangles or Magnum PI during breaks. James has some great stories to share, particularly about free fall parachute failures!

@straightgrain I really enjoyed chatting with you. Thank you for all of your help organizing the event. Thank you for bringing your post sample MP5’s for us to shoot, and thank you for providing the 4.6x30 ammunition for the MP7 demo shoot. We could all see that you were expending a lot of effort to make sure everyone really enjoyed themselves.

Getting to run the M27 IAR, the MP7 and XM8 was an awesome experience. Particularly getting the trigger time on a real unicorn, the XM8. Attending an abridged VP9 Armorer course with Bob Schultze is a wonderful experience. Picking Bob’s brain and getting stories about the development, teething and success of various weapons platforms and accessories was definitely another highlight of the trip. Thanks to Heckler & Koch for supporting this event, bringing experts for us to interface with and providing some amazing firearms to shoot.

Lastly, meeting my fellow HK aficionados was fantastic. Being around people that suffer from the same HK affliction that I do, is not an opportunity we get everyday. I really enjoyed meeting everyone. I particularly enjoyed the time I spent with those in my group. Everyone was dialed in, knowledgeable, supportive and a lot of fun to spend the weekend with.

I’ve already reserved my spot for the next event and I hope I see you guys there!
Indeed, the only thing to make it better was clearly adding Bojangles to the catering schedule and more references to Magnum PI during training. We'll definitely take that to task in next year's event :)
Great training with you!
 
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