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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
hey guys, ive noticed that theres a few gunsmiths out there who can reduce trigger pull down to about two pounds. i also noticed that HK doesnt really like people doing theyre own work to the trigger, which is understandable, but ive done mods to all the rifles ive shot simply by polishing, clipping spring length, and the famous JB weld trick on the sear.

well i just ordered an lem kit, and im still looking to get my pull to about 3.5 lbs at least..... but i dont want to just jump in and without any knowledge and destroy my trigger group. besides leaving the old springs in when i do the mod does anyone know of any other modification i can do to reduce the pull? a pistol group is quite a bit different than a rifle (obviously) and ive never done work to a pistol before.

edit*** i just looked more into the operation of the grouping and found that the sear is very similar to those ive worked on, since hammers are only 10 bucks and i have an LEM kit en route with a new hammer anyway i was wondering what you guys think of taking a small amount of material off the sear catch point on the hammer to make the trigger pull a bit crisper. it seems the pull is about 1/16 after the slack is out until the suprise break in single action. so that might shorten it up a bit..... somewhat similar to the JB weld trick for 10/22's. let me know what you think.

polishing all the connective points is another idea as well.... duh

and yet another idea.... if i was to put a set screw thru the top of the frame that sat somewhat diagonally on the top of the trigger so that you could adjust forward slack in the trigger the gun could be basically turned single action with an extremely short pull. the only thing is that you would have to keep the safe on and rack the slide or cock the hammer by hand. but that would make the overall pull way shorter than it is now, it would only be the length of the actual break point to the reset point
 

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I'm no expert but from what I understand that "slack" in the trigger is actually the firing pin block, once you take up that slack you're ready to fire whether you want to or not, so removing that slack would make it (in my opinion) a rather unsafe weapon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
can you try to explain how that works? that is a part unconnected to the frame and the trigger pull is the same in my opinion with the slide on or off (the Firing pin block is on the slide)..... plus if you take your frame of and look at it while you slowly cycle the action, you can see how the sear has a bit of play before it disconnects with the hammer, letting the hammer fall and firing.

i havent yet looked at the details of the operation of the slide id love if you could explain what you are talking about
 

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Work done on the gun by people other than certified armorers will in all likelihood void your lifetime warranty. Tinkering around the guts of a weapon without having a good understanding of the mechanical works is dangerous. You could end up turning your not so inexpensive gun into a paperweight or worse.

Have you called experienced gunsmiths around to see what they charge for trigger work? May not be as expensive as you think. Had my MP trigger done to a crisp break for $50 plus shipping.
 

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In conjunction with polishing the contact points, the sear on a V1 USP has a small "speed bump" before the hammer notch slips off, allowing the hammer to drop in SA mode. This induces "negative pull"...fighting the hammer spring when the trigger is pulled. Radius this down till its somewhat flat, the round the sharp edge just a hair, anymore than that, it will drop into double action mode when the trigger is pulled. It is difficult to get in there to perform any work as this area is shrouded. This will get you a nice pull ~4lbs; hope this helps.

Whats the JB weld trick on the sear? Never heard that one before.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
the 10/22 sear is a bit rounded and doesnt have a perfectly sharp 45 degree edge, so you put a big glob of jb weld on the edge, and wait until its somewhat cured, then cut and shape it to a sharp edge, then let it finish curing to its maximum hardness. this really shortens the trigger pull and makes it very very crisp,and you dont have to pay 80 bucks for a volquartsen sear. it basically makes the sear get tripped with much less energy and distance, and the gun is still very safe.


i dont see exactly what you are talking about.... would you mind taking a photo and using microsoft paint to put a little circle around the area you are speaking of? i would greatly appreciate it. thanks a bunch
 
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