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Hi guys,

Haven't posted in a while but still readin around the forums and enjoying my p2000 .40 v3 that I got a few months ago.

I have a question about aiming with two eyes open. I've been trying to master this technique ever since I've gotten my p2000 and working on my accuracy at the range. I've been fairly successful with this technique, (I can keep my shots within the 10pt chest area now) but not sure how it all works when shooting rapid fire (like people shoot in competition).

I guess I just want to make sure I am doing this right so I don't get bad habits. So, when you focus on the front sight, the target gets completely blurry. If you can't see the little 10 point chest area on the target, how do you aim at it? When I shoot non-rapid fire, I focus on the target, bring up the gun, then aim the blurry sights on the target. Then when I focus on the front sight, everything else gets blurry and I fire. I usually hit where I was initially aiming for, but, I often don't trust myself when I fire since I can't see anything I'm really aiming at (blurry target).

If I shoot rapid fire, am I supposed to just focus on the clear sights and guess where to put them on the blurry target? Am I doing this all wrong or what? From my understanding, the purpose of keeping two eyes open is so you can more easily acquire the next target (as if you were in competition). Is that right?

Thanks!

Jason
 

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You focus on the front sight. always always always. Yes, the target will be somewhat blurry--you're going center of mass. If your sight alignment is good and your trigger squeeze is consistent, you'll find the center. Good luck.
 

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When you're shooting with both eyes open, your focus should be on the front sight, but your eyes should be pointed towards the target. It's hard to explain in words--imagine that you could shoot laser beams out of your eyes :), they would converge on the target. That's where your eyes are pointing. Your focus should be on the front sight. You will see two sets of front sights, both crystal clear, and one blurry target.

This is hard to do and takes some practice as it's not a natural act for your eyeballs to do. I'm still in the beginner's stage myself. A bit of scotch tape on your glasses over your weak eye can help. Gradually reduce the size of the tape (so it obscures your sights and noting else) until you don't need it. There are dry-fire drills too where you can look at a spot on the wall, then bring your gun up and try to switch focus to the sights without moving your eye's point of aim.

If you're trying to shoot ultimately-tight groups, I think most bullseye shooters switch their focus back and forth between the sights and target and keep going back and forth until they're happy and squeeze off the shot. That's fine if you have a lot of time and a bench rest.
 

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Fron Sight

Unless your presbyopic like me and all those 50+. Then everthing is blurry.
i now close one, it helps me.
 

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When you're shooting with both eyes open, your focus should be on the front sight, but your eyes should be pointed towards the target. It's hard to explain in words--imagine that you could shoot laser beams out of your eyes :), they would converge on the target. That's where your eyes are pointing. Your focus should be on the front sight. You will see two sets of front sights, both crystal clear, and one blurry target.

This is hard to do and takes some practice as it's not a natural act for your eyeballs to do. I'm still in the beginner's stage myself. A bit of scotch tape on your glasses over your weak eye can help. Gradually reduce the size of the tape (so it obscures your sights and noting else) until you don't need it. There are dry-fire drills too where you can look at a spot on the wall, then bring your gun up and try to switch focus to the sights without moving your eye's point of aim.

If you're trying to shoot ultimately-tight groups, I think most bullseye shooters switch their focus back and forth between the sights and target and keep going back and forth until they're happy and squeeze off the shot. That's fine if you have a lot of time and a bench rest.
two sights? how's that? i only see one.
 

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Try some of the links in MueveloNYC's FAQ, they cover this in a lot more detail.

Basically, hold a finger up between your face and your monitor right now, keep looking at the monitor. See two blurry fingers and one focused monitor, right? That's what you want except the lenses in your eye need to adjust so that the finger is focused and the monitor is not. If you end up getting one finger and two monitors while bringing your eyes into focus, you're moving your eyes too, not just the focus. Yes, it's hard to do.
 

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Understand that two eyes open is breed out of combat shooting, it so that you are more situationally aware and dont tunnel vision as bad as closing one eye.

You will not see any marksmen pistol shooters shoot this way (or at least very few), you will however see just about every "operato" engaging and presenting a sight picture to his full view.
 

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OK, Now I am Dizzy!

My problem is that if I focus on the front sight with both eyes open, I get 2 blurry targets and 2 blurry rear sights. I know this takes practice, exspecially with right handed/left eye dominant.

I need to go to Rehab!

Rick
 

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Understand that two eyes open is breed out of combat shooting, it so that you are more situationally aware and dont tunnel vision as bad as closing one eye.

You will not see any marksmen pistol shooters shoot this way (or at least very few), you will however see just about every "operato" engaging and presenting a sight picture to his full view.
Yea, I keep hearing people say to keep both eyes open for situational awareness. Hell, I heard an instructor at the range I go to tell a girl shooting a ruger .22 for the first time that.

I used to shoot arrows with both eyes open, but now my left (non-dominant) eye has a slight stigmatism and everything goes blurry with both eyes open no matter where I try to focus, so I've had to start shutting it when I shoot. But I figured that since I'm only shooting paper, I don't really need to worry about some dude stepping out from behind something and trying to take me out.
 

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Yea, I keep hearing people say to keep both eyes open for situational awareness. Hell, I heard an instructor at the range I go to tell a girl shooting a ruger .22 for the first time that.

I used to shoot arrows with both eyes open, but now my left (non-dominant) eye has a slight stigmatism and everything goes blurry with both eyes open no matter where I try to focus, so I've had to start shutting it when I shoot. But I figured that since I'm only shooting paper, I don't really need to worry about some dude stepping out from behind something and trying to take me out.
If I use both eyes, I'll see two sights and two targets, one set of which is lined up and one set is not. The last time I had a flight physical, I asked for the Class 1 medical to see if I could get one. Nope, have to stay with a class 3 medical, I have horrible convergence. He said he's surprised I don't have double-vision. But I don't because I somehow compensate for it. But it doesn't work for two eye open shooting at all.
 

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If I use both eyes, I'll see two sights and two targets, one set of which is lined up and one set is not. The last time I had a flight physical, I asked for the Class 1 medical to see if I could get one. Nope, have to stay with a class 3 medical, I have horrible convergence. He said he's surprised I don't have double-vision. But I don't because I somehow compensate for it. But it doesn't work for two eye open shooting at all.
wow. that's impressive.
 

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My problem is that if I focus on the front sight with both eyes open, I get 2 blurry targets and 2 blurry rear sights. I know this takes practice, exspecially with right handed/left eye dominant.

I need to go to Rehab!

Rick
you need to learn to bring the gun up under your dominant eye. you should be able to figure that out in about 50 or so presentations. it wasn't difficult at all for me to pick that up.
 

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I agree dominant eye or strong eye may be the problem. To determine strong eye, start with both eyes open. Extend your shooting arm, bring your arm up and line up on an object in the distance. Use your other hand to cover one eye, then the other. The one you natrually use to line up is your strong eye. If your strong eye is opposite from your shooting hand, you may want to read up on some tips for adjusting. My 16 year old daughter is naturally strong eye left but shoots right. As soon as she figured this out, she became a natural. She shoots significantly better than I do. (sigh) She has the gift. Can't seem to get her to shoot anything smaller than the .45 though. go girl.
Arthur
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for the tips. I've been trying really hard to focus on the front sights but my focus always shifts away after I think I have it a little; my left eye (I think I'm right eye dominant) seems to take over my vision and I see more of the left side of the gun.

I've also noticed that how things are lit in the room makes big difference on my focusing abilities. For instance, when there is more lighting downrange and when my sights are backlit, it's harder to focus on my front sight. However, when more light is coming from behind me, it seems easier to focus. Possibly because I can see the white dots better?

Do you guys find it harder to focus under different lighting situations?

jason
 

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Don't look at the white dots. Get rid of them. All black sights rule. They look the same under different lighting.

As for dealing with cross vision, stick a piece of scotch tape on your glasses over the non-dominant eye. This will help you get used to focusing with taking information from the dominant eye.
 

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Thanks for the tips. I've been trying really hard to focus on the front sights but my focus always shifts away after I think I have it a little; my left eye (I think I'm right eye dominant) seems to take over my vision and I see more of the left side of the gun.

I've also noticed that how things are lit in the room makes big difference on my focusing abilities. For instance, when there is more lighting downrange and when my sights are backlit, it's harder to focus on my front sight. However, when more light is coming from behind me, it seems easier to focus. Possibly because I can see the white dots better?

Do you guys find it harder to focus under different lighting situations?

jason
no, i don't have trouble with different lighting conditions. you just need more training on focusing and processing the information from the dominant eye.
 
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