HKPRO Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
581 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, got a lightly used USP .45 not too long ago. The slide wiggles a little, from side to side, and front to back. Its noticeable when the gun is moved side to side, not forcefully but not gentle movement either. Is this normal? I'm sure its no big deal, I just dont remember it on the test gun I used before I bought it, thats all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Hey guys, got a lightly used USP .45 not too long ago. The slide wiggles a little, from side to side, and front to back. Its noticeable when the gun is moved side to side, not forcefully but not gentle movement either. Is this normal? I'm sure its no big deal, I just dont remember it on the test gun I used before I bought it, thats all.
Hmm on all the ~43 HK USP's I have handled ranging in different calibers I have never came across this problem... I shot numerous USP .45's and in my opinion it is not normal but if it does not harm the function you should be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
581 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Its almost best described as movement between the metal slide and polymer frame. You can feel where the two meet, and it feels like theyre not that "tightly" put together. Sorry, Im an HK noob, I dont know how to describe it better....
 
G

·
Slide-to-frame fitment doesn't need to be super-tight on any handgun really and some play is normal. On the few used HKs I've tried (still an HK noob, really) there has been a small amount of slide-to-frame play which seemed normal to me.

Are you a 1911 guy? Some of the higher end 1911s are set up at the factory to have zero slide play b/c it makes gun buyers think that accuracy will be better and that build quality is higher. Usually there are some failures to load or eject until the gun is broken in (500 rounds or so) and the parts have loosened up a bit so it has nothing to do with improving function or accuracy (actually hurts it a little bit). Kimbers are known to behave that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
581 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok. Thats kind of what I figured. My gunsmith said that he thought HK's were usually a little "looser" compared to say, a Sig. Sort of like Glocks. He doesnt stock HK, but he was probably right. Thanks guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
802 Posts
High end 1911 are hand lapped so the slide and the frame fit perfectly. There's no break in needed, nor should there be any reliability problems. Sub $1000 1911's are not hand lapped. They are put together extremely tight to give you the impression that it has a tightly fitted slide to frame fit. Once you "break in" the gun with lots of jams, it'll end up loose again. This is not the proper way to fit a slide to the frame. It's the only way they can sell the gun since most people won't buy a 1911 that has a loose fit. Slide to frame fit is only one small part of getting more accuracy out of a gun by having the parts return to exactly the same position every time. Original 1911's were made to be loose for relability.

Most of the plastic guns will be on the loose end. Nothing you can do about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Note: slide mounting rail length comparison between sig's, hk's, glock's, and 1911's. You will notice that the sigs & 1911s have much longer slide rails than the hk's or glocks. This may also affect what degree of slide/frame play you are noticing.
 
G

·
High end 1911 are hand lapped so the slide and the frame fit perfectly. Sub $1000 1911's are not hand lapped. They are put together extremely tight to give you the impression that it has a tightly fitted slide to frame fit.
that's why I like HKPro :) - straight answers!

It would have taken me awhile to sift through all the BS and find that out on 1911forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Hey guys, got a lightly used USP .45 not too long ago. The slide wiggles a little, from side to side, and front to back. Its noticeable when the gun is moved side to side, not forcefully but not gentle movement either. Is this normal? I'm sure its no big deal, I just dont remember it on the test gun I used before I bought it, thats all.
Yes, it's normal. Every USP has some side to side movement, which can be easily verified by putting the slide on the frame without the recoil spring assembly and barrel. With the recoil spring assembly in place, the movement is a lot less noticeable – unless the spring is weak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Keep in mind a majority of pistols are designed to meet military requirements first and foremost. Mil spec requires the components to be interchangeable as to keep most of the inventory up in running even if it means Frankenstiening parts from gun to gun. (In the most drastic of situations) So the original production 1911 had quite a bit of slide to frame movement. Modern production 1911 guns for the most part have a much tighter slide to frame fit. They are being catered to the civilian market and most people look at slide to frame fit to determine the condition or quality of that gun. However that in of itself does not determine accuracy.

Now back to the original question. Most USP pistols I have owned and or fired do have a little more slide to frame movement than other brands. HOWEVER
most of them have out shot the majority of the other guns. The barrel to slide lock up area is more critical than the slide to frame area. The HK seems to shine here as well as the quality of the barrel rifling itself.

The lock up and rifeling mindset is even more confirmend by the huge number of aftermarket barrels available for a 1911. How many companies do you see advertising they sell HK barrels!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
A little trick I did to my USP expert .45 was to build up a small weld on the guide rod where the bottom of the barrel makes contact while the slide is in battery. This locks the barrel up inside the slide better, some groupings appeared to have shrank some. The barrel is not in super tight, but did reduce the up/down barrel play by 95%+.


Bill
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top