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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quick and simple question. Do people use threadlocker on their overtravel stops on their USP triggers? If so, what kind?

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Might be worth a try. I'm not sure how locktite works on plastic though. They are kind of cheap aren't the, if you run they too far in then back out they get loose.
 

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Yes. The 'light' kind - I believe it's purple. Mine backed out during the 2nd range session. Reset it without Locktite and it hasn't moved since. My gunsmith said to avoid it if possible. It isn't really designed to be used with plastic but it will work.

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Just checked my BLUE Threadlocker Loctite and the directions say do not use on plastic parts.
 

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I've also noticed mine drifts slightly, easily tested by setting it to where it's just barely too far out to let the trigger travel all the way back, then work it a few times and eventually it'll drop the hammer. That said, even after about 1500 rounds now I haven't noticed any tangible difference in overtravel, whether the screw is a mm farther in or not doesn't really factor into how it feels. I don't know if it's worth messing with threadlock and any substance that might in a worst case scenario degrade the plastic or interfere with function in something as critical as a trigger when leaving it alone works fine.

That said, in some other hobbies of mine nail polish is frequently used with plastic screws as a threadlocker and will probably serve you fine here. You could also drop a dab of some plastic-safe transparent glue/silicon on the front face of the trigger so it seeps into the screw hole a little and wipe up the excess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've also noticed mine drifts slightly, easily tested by setting it to where it's just barely too far out to let the trigger travel all the way back, then work it a few times and eventually it'll drop the hammer. That said, even after about 1500 rounds now I haven't noticed any tangible difference in overtravel, whether the screw is a mm farther in or not doesn't really factor into how it feels. I don't know if it's worth messing with threadlock and any substance that might in a worst case scenario degrade the plastic or interfere with function in something as critical as a trigger when leaving it alone works fine.

That said, in some other hobbies of mine nail polish is frequently used with plastic screws as a threadlocker and will probably serve you fine here. You could also drop a dab of some plastic-safe transparent glue/silicon on the front face of the trigger so it seeps into the screw hole a little and wipe up the excess.
I suppose you could say my concern is something similar, that the overtravel stop would drift. It drifted slightly in dry fire and kept the hammer from dropping immediately and produced a hang fire.

My reasoning for looking into threadlocker now is actually to prevent it from moving once it's in a good place, because like you said, the trigger is such a critical component and I wouldn't want it to not fire.

Sounds like the consensus is that threadlocker is worth a try. Now it's just a matter of what approach of threadlocker to take. Vibratite sounds like it'll be a good choice.
 

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I've used purple loctite on mine with no issues. Before I used it, I found that the screw walked a lot, though it tended to be in the "more overtravel" direction, instead of the "you might not fire" direction.

As far as not using loctite on plastic, I'm pretty sure the USP trigger is plastic over metal, and so the threads of the overtravel screw hole are probably going through metal.
 

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Why not just scratch the threads on the stop with an awl or something?
 

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As far as not using loctite on plastic, I'm pretty sure the USP trigger is plastic over metal, and so the threads of the overtravel screw hole are probably going through metal.
The area around the hole is actually polymer but most of the trigger is polymer-coated steel.
 
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