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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to introduce myself, being as this is my first post. I have been a long time troller of the site, and only found it prudent to register now that I have my clone ... i.e. something to talk about:) Anyway, I have put about 300 rounds through the weapon (about 200 less than Vectors suggested break-in time) and decided to disassemble the gun. The reason for doing so was because I wanted a better look at the slight discoloring within the magwell that I had noticed. When opened up I noticed that the inside of my upper reciever was all a goldish-brown hue (like rust). Now I know what rust looks like on a gun (don't let your friends borrow your AK to go shoot in the rain, and forget to clean it), but overall opinion is that it is not rust. Just wondering why the metal has this look to it, and if this is normal/common. Maybe someone wouldn't mind putting up a picture of their reciever for comparison. I would post picture, but I'm still trying to figure everything out. Excuse my ignorance.
 

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I believe Vector does not parkerize their guns prior to painting/refinishing unless you specifically request it. There is an additional chagre for park. You may want to call them and ask about the discoloration.
 

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Welcome to the forum. What Caliber is your Vector 94? I have had the .40 S&W for about a month or so and have put over 300 rounds through it with only 2 FTF's. Real happy with it!
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thankyou for the warm welcome. The Vector is in 9mm, I had looked at the
.40 but decided to stick with the basics ... try and keep it true to the original ya know. Haven't had one problem with it yet, except maybe that little nagging voice inside telling me to hurry up and SBR it :) Thanks for the info JFK - just seems strange for a company to manufacture these guns, clone or not, and not parkerize them unless it is requested. They have to know these things are being sold for $1,500+ Hell, I bought a Intratec Tec-9 for $500 at a gunshow (more of a collection curio than anything) that had a nicer finish inside. My wife asked me why the inside was,"gold," the other day. All I could think to show her was to heat up the inside of a soda can to demonstrate what happens to aluminum. Still wondering if someone can throw up some pictures of their recievers for comparison ... parkerized or not. Thankyou for not showing your disgust for the newbie with the dumb questions.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So I contacted Vector today and talked to Chuck. The way he puts it is that all of their guns are parkerized before leaving, BUT I can send it back and if he deems the finish too terribly poor they will redo it free (via warranty). He also mentioned something along the lines of controlled rust?! Some solution they dipped the weapon into before parkerizing it ... would anyone like to enlighten me? I also took it to the shop I bought it from, and one of the smiths agree that it is park free. What color/finish should the weapon have if properly parked? All these views and still no pictures to compare. I'm located down here in Summerville, SC, if there are any locals who would like to get together.
 

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There are two types of Parkerizing. Zinc Phosphate and Maganese Phosphate. Zinc leaves a light gray finish while Maganese looks charcoal gray to black. Both types are good as an undercoat (primer).

Most factory HKs I've seen are parkerized then the exterior is painted and baked. The interior is left just parked and lightly oiled. The oil will soak in the pores and darken.

If you do a search on several boards, you'll find other customers who complain their Vectors are rusting on the inside, not parked. If your local smith is telling you the interior is not parked, then I'd guess you got one of the non-parked Vectors. Hopefully Vector includes parkerizing as one of the steps before refinishing as standard practice.

If you check the member's gallery under SP89 rebuild, you'll see an SP89 that was parkerized and refinished with Gunkote. The park was done in Maganese.

As far as controlled rust, bluing is controlled rust. Rust/bluing is actually a stain while parkerizing is a coating. I think Chuck is pulling your leg, unless he meant the receiver was bare metal and left in a damp shop for several days/months before they painted it.
 

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This post brings up a question I have had for a long time. Before you apply something like duracoat, you are supposed to park it. But when you park something, you are supposed to dip it directly into oil, which you wouldn't do if you were going to spray on a paint coating. So what is the procedure for the inside of a receiver? Do you rub a little oil on it between parking and painting the outside hoping not to get oil on the outside surface or do you let it rust during the paint process and then oil it later and live with the rust.
 

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This post brings up a question I have had for a long time. Before you apply something like duracoat, you are supposed to park it. But when you park something, you are supposed to dip it directly into oil, which you wouldn't do if you were going to spray on a paint coating. So what is the procedure for the inside of a receiver? Do you rub a little oil on it between parking and painting the outside hoping not to get oil on the outside surface or do you let it rust during the paint process and then oil it later and live with the rust.


After the park is finished, remove it from the tank and dip it into a bath of fresh water with baking soda. This will neutralize the park solution from further chemical reaction.

At this pont you can blast it with an air hose and put it into an oven to dry. If this is done quickly, it will not rust. If you plan to paint later, you can spray it with a light oil such as WD40 or Brownells "Hold". This will keep the receiver from reacting.

The oil can be degreased with MEK, Acetone, or good ole cheapie Walmart brake cleaner, prior to painting. Vector guns were not parked prior to painting. Checking several boards, you'll find others who have encountered this problem.

There are brush on chemicals that will give a "cold" parkerized finish such as "K Phos" from KG Industries. This is for people who are not set up with a park tank. I've never used it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Very informative - and JFK I have to let you know just how beautiful that SP89 came out. Being a long time fan of the HK guns, I can't explain how envious I am of that gun ... not just the fact that I wish my Vector was finished that superbly, but the fact that you have the means of which to do the work. Truly remarkable! I can barely get my lawn mower to start sometimes let alone even think about putting that much attention to detail into a project.
 

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Parkerizing is actually a chemical reaction. It eats at the metal like an acid , that is why you have to neutralize it/wash it after the dip. Blueing is controled rusting. When I parked mine, It went from the solution to a plain hot water bath(boiling hot), hot water on hot metal evaporates very quickly!! Then to the oven for a good crevice drying. No compressed air as the risk of oil,rust, or water from the equipment. While it was still warm I applied a ceramic enamel. After the paint baked then I applied the oil to the parkerized metal. Zinc Phospahate parkerizing is actually better for a paint over application as it a rougher texture when completed. Manganese Phospate is a more pourous but finer texture, better for holding oil and preventing rust and not needing to be painted.

Well, thats my story, anyhow.. here are the results

 

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It is a converted 94 bbl, Mike a TSC Machine did the work. I can't tell exactly how he did it, but you can't tell by looking that it has a 3 lug adapter threaded to the original bbl.
 
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