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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I found the excellent Detail Strip tutorial as I wanted to go slightly beyond the standard field strip cleaning and clear out any fouling that found it's way in to the firing pin channel over the past year + of shooting it. Getting the firing pin assembly out is easy, but I noticed the firing pin assembly support sleeve is plastic so I am not sure how many times it will take a punch compressing it before it will start to wear. HK Parts actually sells them (fwiw, I noticed they also have a fancy titanium firing pin too), but disassembling the firing pin assembly to replace the sleeve is not so obvious (to me). I couldn't find any online resources that detail how this is done. Do they exist? Has anyone done this before? Do I even need to worry about the support sleeve getting a bit of wear?

Many thanks.
 

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Though very robust when assembled, the internal components of the VP9 are relatively delicate individually; easily damaged. Quite simply, this is not a pistol that guys should be taking apart and putting back together again repeatedly, especially if they are not skilled and have the correct tooling. Although the blanket statement of "HK Certified Armorer" exists for detailed work on all of their weapons, it is especially true with the VP9.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Though very robust when assembled, the internal components of the VP9 are relatively delicate individually; easily damaged. Quite simply, this is not a pistol that guys should be taking apart and putting back together again repeatedly, especially if they are not skilled and have the correct tooling. Although the blanket statement of "HK Certified Armorer" exists for detailed work on all of their weapons, it is especially true with the VP9.
Yeah, I agree, which is why I didn't intend to go beyond the firing pin channel for cleaning purposes. My sleeve isn't worn, but I wanted to post to learn if it was, in fact, easy to replace (i.e. I was overlooking something obvious). If the short answer was "NO" and it began showing wear, it seems sending it to an HK armorer would be best.

That said, are there best practices for clearing out the firing pin channel w/o actually removing the firing pin? Compressed air is what I have been using, but I will say getting the pin assembly out allowed me to remove quite a bit of fouling that accumulated since I bought it. Any harm in doing that once a year, or is it simply best to stay out of the firing pin channel all together?
 

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That said, are there best practices for clearing out the firing pin channel w/o actually removing the firing pin? Compressed air is what I have been using, but I will say getting the pin assembly out allowed me to remove quite a bit of fouling that accumulated since I bought it. Any harm in doing that once a year, or is it simply best to stay out of the firing pin channel all together?
Maintenance really depends on how much you shoot and how dirty the ammo is that you shoot. How you maintain your weapon also comes into play.
I see HKs often that are clearly carried and poorly maintained in humid environments, with the result being rust on the internal components. Just look at the position of the pistol when it is in the holster and then imagine how many times you might have been out at the range when it rained. That rain enters the rear of the weapon, flows down the firing pin assembly and then comes to rest within. So, yeah, it makes sense to take your pistol down further than just removing the slide, barrel and recoil assembly at times for a more detailed cleaning.
Everyone has their own preference on cleaning products, but a good solvent and handful of q-tips will go a long way to keeping your HK running smoothly. Running those down the firing pin channel is a smart thing to do, as well as lubricate the firing pin assembly, if you do not completely disassemble and clean its individual parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Running those down the firing pin channel is a smart thing to do, as well as lubricate the firing pin assembly, if you do not completely disassemble and clean its individual parts.
Thank you for both of your detailed replies - it is tremendously helpful to have someone with experience chime in on subjects like this and it is much appreciated. I clean my VP9 after every trip to the range. However, I think it wise to make the firing pin channel a more frequent part of my cleaning routine going forward. A nylon spudger (i.e. an iPhone disassembly tool) would be gentler compressing that plastic support sleeve than a punch, so I am going to add that to my kit.

My last question for you: the support sleeve edge that gets compressed will obviously get mild wear over time if you access the FP channel with semi-regular frequency (few times a year)... would that of any concern? Are there any signs of wear I should be cognizant of on that support sleeve, or is it more a matter of making sure it isn't buckled (or something more obvious) before thinking about having a professional replace it?

Sorry for what may be obvious questions, but I want to ensure I am treating the firearm with care. It was a big investment for me! :)

Thanks again.
 

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Just keep an eye on the sleeve. If it starts to "buckle" or show excessive wear, swap it out.
If you look at the P7 firing pin assembly, you'll appreciate the fact that those parts are made of metal instead.
 

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I found the excellent Detail Strip tutorial as I wanted to go slightly beyond the standard field strip cleaning and clear out any fouling that found it's way in to the firing pin channel over the past year + of shooting it. Getting the firing pin assembly out is easy, but I noticed the firing pin assembly support sleeve is plastic so I am not sure how many times it will take a punch compressing it before it will start to wear. HK Parts actually sells them (fwiw, I noticed they also have a fancy titanium firing pin too), but disassembling the firing pin assembly to replace the sleeve is not so obvious (to me). I couldn't find any online resources that detail how this is done. Do they exist? Has anyone done this before? Do I even need to worry about the support sleeve getting a bit of wear?

Many thanks.
Disassemble the firing pin assembly and clean just like a Glock, nothing to it.
 

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I damaged my firing pin sleeve the first time I took the firing pin out to clean the channel, the sleeve is so thin when I pushed down and released the tension removing the back plate the firing pin sleeve slammed the tool I was using pushing that thin part of the sleeve inwards toward to firing pin spring.

I did not notice this until I did my cleaning then reassembled and then dry fired a few times something was gritty and then I noticed my mistake, I never had this problem with any other striker handgun that has the firing pin disassemble this way the same way as so many other striker fired handguns.

So I took the firing pin back out and pushed the slightly damaged sleeve back in its place as to not interfere with the striker spring but I did not like it I felt the little thin plastic piece may at any time fold back towards the firing pin probably not but I had to order another sleeve and replace it.

My question is I can't believe I don't see more members comment on this I know many like me like to clean the firing pin channel every 500 rounds or so is no one else noticing this damage to the sleeve where you place your tool to push down on the sleeve to release the pressure and when the firing pin slams backwards into the back plate causing that very slight damage ti the thin sleeve?

I have not tried but I was thinking next time I need to clean the channel this time when I push down on the sleeve to release pressure on the back plate I then slightly push the plate off but not all the way then remove the punch before the spring can push back, so once I have the back plate about half way off I then remove the tool/punch before the back plate is completely off. I've never tried it this way with any handgun but hopefully it will work.
 

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I have purchased the HK Parts firing pin sleeve and will replace the stock one as soon as the new one arrives. I already replaced the slide cap with the hkparts enhanced model made of Titanium and that was quite easy. I will take some pictures as I replace the sleeve and post the process. I do not expect it to be very difficult but we'll see.
 

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Now available in Stainless Steel

Awesome thanks for the heads up on that metal sleeve I did not know it existed. That is certainly a must own because the factory sleeve is so thin easily messed up when removing firing pin.
Now there is one available in stainless steel. My tools also tend to dig into the aluminum aftermarket part. This one is hard and can be disassembled again and again without damage.

https://lakelinellc.com/shop/hk-vp9vp9skvp40-stainless-steel-striker-guidesupport-sleeve/

 

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I like to strip mine down after every session, at least to the sub assemblies (mostly just slide, I don’t see the need to take the frame apart) to see how things are. My VP9SK is now officially in my EDC rotation so I get pretty fanatical about a clean weapon if it’s a carry piece. Regardless the plastic sleeve on the Hk is seemingly less robust than its Glock counterparts.

I ordered the red aluminum piece. I used aluminum tools for takedown so I shouldn’t have issues (and I don’t with plastic, but having a backup never hurts). I also ordered the red cover/plate for grins...add a little touch of color to the pistol.

Thanks for the thread. This pistol is my first Hk so I’m enjoying contrasting the engineering between brands/types of pistols.
 

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I like to strip mine down after every session, at least to the sub assemblies (mostly just slide, I don’t see the need to take the frame apart) to see how things are. My VP9SK is now officially in my EDC rotation so I get pretty fanatical about a clean weapon if it’s a carry piece. Regardless the plastic sleeve on the Hk is seemingly less robust than its Glock counterparts.

I ordered the red aluminum piece. I used aluminum tools for takedown so I shouldn’t have issues (and I don’t with plastic, but having a backup never hurts). I also ordered the red cover/plate for grins...add a little touch of color to the pistol.

Thanks for the thread. This pistol is my first Hk so I’m enjoying contrasting the engineering between brands/types of pistols.
Curious, can you explain please?
 

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Curious, can you explain please?
In the case of the Hk VP9SK, I field strip, remove back-plate, remove striker/firing pin assembly, wipe, and inspect. I wouldn’t shy away from dissembling this too, but there isn’t anything that cant be seen from viewing the assembly as a whole (and a lot less to potentially lose like retaining clips).

For a Glock, much the same, add removal of the extractor depressor assembly, firing pin safety/spring, extractor.

For 1911...lol. Lots to clean, but firing pin/spring and extractor generally speaking.

Cleaning is the action being taken, but the motivation is inspection. I am not about to place my life in the hands of something I haven’t taken the personal time and responsibility to inspect and thoroughly clean between range sessions. I have never understood the apparent short-sightedness of placing one’s life in the hands of something they couldn’t take the brief time to clean and inspect.

Now...something that I purely use at the range...I mean its not vital to clean....but I do anyways. Call me a bit compulsive in that regard.

I don’t mean any of the above as a slight to those with different philosophies. We are all welcome to our own SOPs.


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^^ He think he meant to ask why you think the VP support sleeve is less robust than Glock's.
Hahaha fair point!

Perhaps an illustration.

The Glock plastic sleeve has thicker walls and ribs that are integral to design, but also provide additional structure and a wider point to utilize a tool to depress it fully and replace the back plate:



Here is a pic of what I ordered, but imagine in plastic (from the factory):




I think both are of perfeect quality from the factory for their stated purpose, however I would argue that the Hk piece is more susceptible to damage incidentally, thus why a stronger piece would be desirable if breaking down to this level often.



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