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I have put about 2000 rounds through a VP9, my new favorite pistol. It is ideal for the CCP (concealed carry pistol) division of IDPA .... very fast to draw and reload and most of all it has been 100% reliable. Yes, I really do love it.

My impression from reading other VP9 user reports is that VP9 trigger quality varies from gun to gun. Some report what sound like great triggers. Mine had a good but not truly a great trigger; it broke at about 5 lbs, but somewhat inconsistent and not especially crisp. The sear and striker showed what looked like uneven engagement. I was not willing to try to smooth or reshape these parts of the gun, and so tried a new gunsmith shop here on Cape Cod, Kulas Customs LLC (easy to find their web page). Kulas trued and smoothed out the engagement surfaces and polished a few other pieces with the result that the trigger is now much improved. It is slightly lighter than before, but definitley crisper on the break and has a more emphatic reset. They did the work in about two days, and the cost was very reasonable.

Snce then I have added the HK match trigger spring set, but not convinced this added much. The takeup is a bit lighter, but it wasn't too heavy before. Probably should have spent that money on ammo.

Bottom line: VP9 triggers are very, very good, but can be made even better.
 

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I wonder how much the difference in a trigger like the vp9 has really makes in their shooting? It seems that there isn't too much to be done to a trigger like that that would affect the "average" shooter. Do you really notice it when shooting in idpa? Just curious. Seems everyone wants a better trigger but I always wonder how many are better "shooters" because of a trigger job?
 

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I wonder how much the difference in a trigger like the vp9 has really makes in their shooting? It seems that there isn't too much to be done to a trigger like that that would affect the "average" shooter. Do you really notice it when shooting in idpa? Just curious. Seems everyone wants a better trigger but I always wonder how many are better "shooters" because of a trigger job?
I notice a huge difference in my IDPA M&P pro and my USP or Glock Triggers and I'm what I consider an average shooter.
 

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I just switched to a stock VP9 from a customized CZ. The trigger on the CZ was unquestionably "better" but I shoot the VP9 noticeably better. A good trigger matters but, for me, other factors mattered more.
 

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I have a cz tactical sports and a few other guns with what I would consider great triggers. and shooting them for accuracy I can see the difference. But in a match my scores really aren't much different. I suppose if I were a better shooter technically it would make more of a difference. It's interesting to me...
 

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I wonder how much the difference in a trigger like the vp9 has really makes in their shooting?
I noticed a huge difference between the shooting level I was at right away with the VP9 versus my P2000 LEM. I shot the Dot Torture Test with my P2000 first, which is my duty gun. I estimate I have around 8-10,000 rounds with that gun, and I shoot it at a pretty decent level. I do have to work at getting a good score on the Dot Torture with the P2k. Right out of the box with the VP9, I was easily surpassing my performance level with the pistol I can run almost subconsciously, cold, on demand. I don't think this was entirely due to the trigger, because the P2k is too small for me, and being able to literally fit the VP9 to my hands made a huge difference too.
 

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I wonder how much the difference in a trigger like the vp9 has really makes in their shooting?...

It's the same principle involved here for a bigger flashier truck, boat, etc. Many men feel that if they only had better eqpmt. that they too could be a real "operator"!! :rolleyes: It's the magician and not the wand.
 

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I wonder how much the difference in a trigger like the vp9 has really makes in their shooting? It seems that there isn't too much to be done to a trigger like that that would affect the "average" shooter. Do you really notice it when shooting in idpa? Just curious. Seems everyone wants a better trigger but I always wonder how many are better "shooters" because of a trigger job?
State IDPA championship I shot two years ago was just every bit as technical as a high level USPSA match. A ton of one handed stuff, swingers and movers, partial target at 35, prone from under the barrel, start with wet hands. Some shots were tough to make period, let alone on a timer. While I am of opinion that shooter's development happens on tough triggers (both of my Grayguns P30 right now are sprung with heaviest springs save for FPBS '), for the competition - if I cared to win - I'd go for a performance setup 'cause I know it does matter. If you shot Glocks, it would be easy to prove by switching connectors and trying to hit a hard target on a timer.
 

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State IDPA championship I shot two years ago was just every bit as technical as a high level USPSA match. A ton of one handed stuff, swingers and movers, partial target at 35, prone from under the barrel, start with wet hands. Some shots were tough to make period, let alone on a timer. While I am of opinion that shooter's development happens on tough triggers (both of my Grayguns P30 right now are sprung with heaviest springs save for FPBS '), for the competition - if I cared to win - I'd go for a performance setup 'cause I know it does matter. If you shot Glocks, it would be easy to prove by switching connectors and trying to hit a hard target on a timer.
Thanks for this! I have never shot idpa and am a relatively new shooter, about 2 1/2 years. I know a good trigger makes a difference, but I wonder how many people put time and money into a trigger job thinking it's going to make a difference when they would be better off spending time on other fundamentals.
 

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State IDPA championship I shot two years ago was just every bit as technical as a high level USPSA match. A ton of one handed stuff, swingers and movers, partial target at 35, prone from under the barrel, start with wet hands. Some shots were tough to make period, let alone on a timer. While I am of opinion that shooter's development happens on tough triggers (both of my Grayguns P30 right now are sprung with heaviest springs save for FPBS '), for the competition - if I cared to win - I'd go for a performance setup 'cause I know it does matter. If you shot Glocks, it would be easy to prove by switching connectors and trying to hit a hard target on a timer.
Thanks for this! I have never shot idpa and am a relatively new shooter, about 2 1/2 years. I know a good trigger makes a difference, but I wonder how many people put time and money into a trigger job thinking it's going to make a difference when they would be better off spending time on other fundamentals.
 

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It is a valid question. I think some do that, but they never become good shooters. Most good shooters I know do both, tirelessly work on their skills and invest some cash, depending on disposable income and preferences, in hardware improvement.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I agree with YVK's sentiment; the best shooters work constantly on their skills and, when necessary, on their gun (and ammo).

No doubt the shooter is by far the most important part of the equation.
 

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I liked the Vp 9 out of the box, but I also like a lighter trigger pull. Grayguns does some sweet work and made my Vp 9 a really awesome shooting pistol. Hk's are relatively new to me, but I've been shooting Glocks stock and with modified triggers for over 20 years. I'm into shooting rifles at really long ranges, so I've been use to light and crisp triggers for a long time. I agree you have to to have the fundamentals to shoot any firearm fairly well, but a really good trigger is key to smaller group sizes.
 
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